arab writer

Habibti, 
he says when I am honey.
And leaves me hungry
for spices. He leaves 
me angry and in love. 
I love you. I 
say it so desperately
and it does not calm me.
And he does not always
say it back.
I guess it’s too
European for him to
say: I love you too.  

Albi, 
he says when I am alone 
in the kitchen, crying softly,
before I cut a pomegranate.
I tell him I miss him
and he does not
cause the lust might 
devour me tonight.
He only misses me 
when another man’s
hand is on my thigh 
for my body is his 
property. 

Hayati, 
he says when he 
has spoken to his mother
about my Henna tattoos.
But he has not said
anything to my 
father about the white sheets.
I say marriage.
He says Insha'Allah.

—  Arabic Is The New French from The Immigration Series by Royla Asghar 
My Palestinian, 
my white, 
my green, 
my red, 
and my black. 
I would give you my body 
as a sacrifice. 
I bet I would look 
gorgeous in a
traditional thobe. 
My eyes in kohl, 
your fingers on my lips,
pronouncing your Arabic.
The ruins of an empire
lives inside you, my love.
And I am your bedouin woman,
I will leave every tribe for you.
I will steal your clothes,
I will claim myself yours,
naked in the desert, my love 
is thirsty. My love is a country 
eating yours. 
I adopt you inside of me, 
your country is mine.
I am a nation,
and I am a war.
And you’ve always 
said you want to die
as a martyr.
—  Palestine Is In Love from The Immigration Series by Royla Asghar 

i prayed to Allah for you

before you were mine i asked our Lord
for a woman
who would love me

for a woman
to love
in return

silly me,
even while your were here
i kept asking for you

until one day i asked Allah the right way
not, ‘bring me a woman’
but, ‘show me the woman’

and i saw you

we saw each other

i prayed to Allah for you

before you were mine i asked our Lord
for a woman
who would love me

for a woman
to love
in return

lucky me,
Allah listened.

—  there is space for a queer womyn in this culture. // blessed.
خفقة قلبك لإمرأة، أو صداقتك لرجل، أو قراءتك لكتاب، هي أسفار حقيقية وميلاد جديد لك، وتاريخ جديد لحياتك.
—  د.مصطفى_محمود
Poc house hold
  • <p> <b><p></b> <b>Poc parents :</b> *opens up your mail and read it *<p/><b>Poc parents:</b> *Opens up thier mail and ask you to read it for them*<p/><b></b> I don't understand 😧<p/></p><p/></p>
I want my man on his knees for sacrifice. I want my beauty immortal. I want biology to create cells in my name. I want my children to grow up in their father’s culture, but to die in my grandfather’s. I want to feel the world to the bone.
—  Marriage by Royla Asghar 

emerging-writer  asked:

I'm planning a pirate fantasy story, and I one of the characters is coded as Arabic. I've been reading about Arabic naming conventions and I was wondering, since this world doesn't have the same countries as our world or the same religions, how you would recommend naming her. I already have Imana picked out for her first name but I'm not entirely sure if I should use "bint [insert dad's name][family name]" or not? I would really just like some advice for this and I hope this isn't offensive.

Non-Islamic Arabic Naming

Hello,

There are tons of Arabic names that are not Islam-related. Names like Deema, Sabrina, Yasmin, Nardeen, Rana, etc. Basically look up Arabic names, and check the ones you like to see if they have an Islamic meaning. 

For example, Imana means believer, which is generally a name given to Muslim girls. Regarding the bint thing, in a lot of Arab countries our middle names are our father’s names, which is where the bint/bin comes in. It’s pretty much just saying “Yasmin daughter of [my dad’s name] of [family name]”. It’s not offensive, and I can’t imagine it being seen as such with the information you’ve given me. It’s an Arab convention, not an Islamic one. 

Picking a middle name is the same process as picking the first name, just male instead of female. As for a last name, a lot of Arab last names are names of places, the name of an ancestor, or a trait of the first person with the name. My last name roughly translates to “traveller” because my ancestors moved around a lot. There are also lots of families with last names like Al-Othman, which means family of Othman, their ancestor. 

I think you’re on the right track, and if you feel doubtful about the final name you’ve chosen for some reason, you can follow up with us!

-Mod Yasmin