arab israeli war

Jerusalem. June 9, 1967. In this iconic picture, several Israeli soldiers stand close together in front of the Western, or Wailing, Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem, following its capture from Jordanian rule in the Six-Day War.

Photograph: David Rubinger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

It is unfortunate that most people who are very vocal about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, do not take a balanced approach. Sadly, most tend to adamantly support one side, and have nothing but disdain for the other. People who actually try and understand both sides are definitely in the minority. Most fail to see or show where each side is right, and where each was wrong. They do not want to or cannot see why both sides feel the way they do. They almost never talk about how it was non-Jewish and non-Muslim powers that initiated much of this and how they are also at fault. As far as I am concerned the lives and rights of both Israelis and Palestinians matter, they should all be taken into consideration, and if more people took a balanced approach to be more understanding of both sides, we would be living in a much different world.

LEBANON. Beirut. 1982. Italian peacekeeping troops patrol in the evening. They were part of the Multinational Force in Lebanon (MNF), created in 1982 and disbanded in 1984 following its growing ineffectiveness and the re-escalation of the war. It included the United States, France, the UK and Italy.

Photograph: Chris Steele-Perkins/Magnum Photos

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LEBANON. Tyre. July 2006. Marco di Lauro’s coverage of the 2006 Lebanon War. Here, aftermaths of Israeli airstrikes. All pictures: Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images [Part 1]

Photograph 1: Two Lebanese civilians wait for further treatment upon arrival at the hospital. According to Hospital Officials, a family traveling in a van trying to flee the villages south of Tyre was hit by an Israeli warplane reportedly killing 13 people as well as injuring 13. July 23, 2006.

Photograph 2: 3-year-old, Nimar Ramait recovers in his hospital bed after he was injured by a bomb dropped by an Israeli war plane on a water canal where he was swimming. For a sixth day, Israel continued it’s extensive bombing of villages and the civilian population in Southern Lebanon. July 17, 2006.

Photograph 3: The bodies of the victims of the Qana Israeli air strike wrapped in plastic having been brought from Qana to the morgue. Twenty-two bodies were brought to the morgue wrapped in plastic and loaded into a refrigerator truck. The Israeli air strike killed 56 civilians of which 34 of them were children, in the worst attack since the fighting began 19 days ago. July 30, 2006.

Photograph 4: 18 year old Zahra Al-Jamira cries in shock after she realized that her face is burnt as a result of a bomb dropped by an Israeli warplane. For a seventh day, Israel continued its extensive bombing of villages and the civilian population in Southern Lebanon. July 18, 2006.

The 2006 Lebanon War, also called the 2006 Israel–Hezbollah War was a 34-day military conflict in Lebanon, Northern Israel and the Golan Heights. The principal parties were Hezbollah paramilitary forces and the Israel Defence Forces (IDF). The conflict is believed to have killed between 1,191 and 1,300 Lebanese people (mostly civilians), and 165 Israelis (including 44 civilians). It severely damaged Lebanese civil infrastructure, and displaced approximately one million Lebanese and 300,000–500,000 Israelis.

Various groups and individuals accused both Israel and Hezbollah of violations of these laws during the conflict, and warned of possible war crimes. These allegations included intentional attacks on civilian populations or infrastructure, disproportionate or indiscriminate attacks, the use of human shields, and the use of prohibited weapons. 

No formal charges have been filed against either group.  

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LEBANON. July/August 2006. Marco di Lauro’s coverage of the 2006 Lebanon War. All pictures: Marco di Lauro/Getty Images [Part 3]

Photograph 1: Beirut - August 20, 2006. Buildings lay destroyed from Israeli air strikes during the conflict between Hezbollah and Israel in the southern suburb of Haret Hreik. Many Lebanese are coming to the destroyed neighbourhoods in Beirut to access the damage, which is so extreme that residents of the area cannot return home.

Photograph 2: Beirut - August 19, 2006. Lebanese children pass by the rubble of destroyed buildings, covering their faces to protect themselves from the dust and the smell destruction in the southern suburb of Haret Hreik. Most of the Lebanese traveling around in the Southern suburbs of Beirut are living in other neighborhoods and came to see and photograph the destruction as well as collect Hezbollah posters. Hezbollah place banners on the top of each destroyed building reading: ”Made in USA, Trade Mark, The Divine Victory.”

Photograph 3: Bint Jbail - July 31, 2006. A portrait of the former head of Hezbollah, Abbas Mussawi, who was killed by the Israelis, lies amongst destroyed buildings as a result of an Israeli bombing campaign. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert said that no cease-fire had been agreed between Israel and Hezbollah. Some residents of Bint Jbail, the Hezbollah stronghold and the scene of the most violent fighting that has destroyed the city try to flee towards a safer shelter.

Photograph 4: Saddiqine - August 15, 2006. A Lebanese family who returned to find their house destroyed as a result of the Israeli bombing campaign, stand in one of their apartment rooms holding candle lights, as there is no power in their village. As a cease-fire between Israel and Hezbollah enters its first day, thousands of residents took returned to their villages in Southern Lebanon, many of which have been destroyed by Israeli bombings.

Photograph 5: Aita Ech Chaab - August 15, 2006. Hanaifi Naher Hassan, the grandmother of Zainab Jamil accesses the damages of one of the rooms of her apartment upon her return home after a month long Israeli bombing campaign. The Jamil family spent the last 20 days as refugees in the Ramesh village and returned home just days prior to find their house destroyed as a result of an Israeli bombing campaign. As Hezbollah claimed victory over Israel and a ceasefire halted the fighting, thousands of residents returned to their villages in Southern Lebanon of which many had been destroyed.

The 2006 Lebanon War, also called the 2006 Israel–Hezbollah War was a 34-day military conflict in Lebanon, Northern Israel and the Golan Heights. The principal parties were Hezbollah paramilitary forces and the Israel Defence Forces (IDF). 

The conflict started on 12 July 2006, and continued until a United Nations-brokered ceasefire went into effect in the morning on 14 August 2006, though it formally ended on 8 September 2006. Due to unprecedented Iranian military support to Hezbollah before and during the war, some consider it the first round of the Iran–Israel proxy conflict, rather than a continuation of the Arab–Israeli conflict. Both sides claimed victory.

The conflict is believed to have killed between 1,191 and 1,300 Lebanese people (mostly civilians), and 165 Israelis (including 44 civilians). It severely damaged Lebanese civil infrastructure, and displaced approximately one million Lebanese and 300,000–500,000 Israelis. 

Under international humanitarian law, warring parties are obliged to distinguish between combatants and civilians, ensure that attacks on legitimate military targets are proportional, and guarantee that the military advantage of such attacks outweigh the possible harm done to civilians. 

Violations of these laws are considered war crimes. Various groups and individuals accused both Israel and Hezbollah of violations of these laws during the conflict, and warned of possible war crimes. These allegations included intentional attacks on civilian populations or infrastructure, disproportionate or indiscriminate attacks, the use of human shields, and the use of prohibited weapons.

No formal charges have been filed against either group. 

أنا لست عائداً فحسب
ًبل فلسطين عائدة إلي أيضا
إنها مسألة وقت مهما يطل الزمن
— 

“I’m not just returning [to Palestine]…
But Palestine herself is
 also returning to me.
It’s only a matter of time and it doesn’t matter how long it takes.”

- Shafiq al-Hout, a Palestinian politician and writer. Born in Jaffa, Palestine. He and his family fled to Beirut at the onset of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. He founded the Palestine Liberation Front in 1961 and later became a founder of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) in 1964.