arab israeli war

LEBANON. July 2006.

Abbas, a chubby young boy, sat on the side of a narrow village road, held his injured mother’s hand and wept. “Don’t leave me, mother, don’t go, don’t go.” “Take care of your brothers and sisters,“ the mother moaned softly, as her eyes closed leaving two white slits. A piece of shrapnel had cut into her chest and almost severed her right arm. Blood stained mother and child.

Abbas, his mother, brother, aunts and a grandmother, 18 in total, were cramped inside a small white minivan, fleeing their village in south Lebanon when an Israeli rocket pierced the roof of the car. Now the survivors were scattered on the road or in the shadow of a building crying, while inside the van lay the headless corpse of an uncle, a dead grandmother and a neighbor.

“Why are you leaving me,” Abbas started yelling at his mother, as her arm fell on the ground. He buried his face in his hands and wept. His brother, 12-year old Ali, stood on the other side of the mother, his hand bandaged and eyes staring into the horizon, as the Lebanese Red Cross started helping the survivors.

Photograph: Ghaith Abdul-Ahad/Getty Images

A Brief Overview of How the CIA Messed Up Syria

The extent of US involvement in the bloodless coup, which overthrew the secular democracy that sprung up in Syria after World War II, has been disputed ever since it happened. The general understanding is that in 1949, the CIA decided their best bet to further US interests in the area would be to “encourage” a coup d’etat in the country. They had a “reasonable” reason, too. A proposed construction project, the Trans-Arabian Pipeline, was in danger of not being built under the rule of Shukri-al-Quwatli, the first president of Syria. And no one messes with the United States’ god-given right to an uninterrupted oil supply!

Husni al-Za’im (above), who had been convicted less than a decade earlier for graft, was basically chosen by the CIA to be the next leader of Syria. He was encouraged, given money and men, and dutifully overthrew Syria’s democratically elected president. And who would have guessed it? Almost immediately, the pipeline plans were approved! As were a number of pro-American initiatives, such as peaceful negotiations with Israel, just a year after the first Arab-Israeli War which Syria was prominent in.

Husni al-Za’im lasted just four months before being “deposed” (read: secretly executed) by his slightly-more-popular colleague, a strongman who ruled as a dictator for five years before being deposed in turn. Coup after coup occurred. Finally, in 1963, one wannabe dictator actually figured out his stuff and held the country for thirty years until his death. That would be Hafez al-Assad, father of Bashar al-Assad.

EGYPT. Sinai Peninsula. 1972. Hand of a dead Egyptian soldier. 

‘Five years after the 1967 war in Sinai, I returned with colleagues to have a look at the battlefield. The wind had blown away the sand, revealing a macabre memento of the war. The hand of an Egyptian soldier who had found his grave in the dunes. Next to it was his helmet. His forefinger was pointing to heaven as though in admonition: No More War. But Sadat had arrived 10 years too late for him’

Photograph: David Rubinger/Corbis/Getty

anonymous asked:

What are best books/sources to learn about the palestinian-Israeli conflict?

Books

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Contested Histories by Neil Caplan. This is, in my view, required reading if you want to have you want to have all of your facts 100% straight.

Obstacle to Peace: The US Role in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict by Jeremy R. Hammond. An absolutely fantastic read, and very easy to digest. I will say that it’s not “neutral” like Caplan’s book is, not that I consider that much of a problem. Though the book provides plenty historical context as necessary, it focuses primarily on the events that follow the first Oslo accords, up to Operation Protective Edge.

The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, by John J. Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt

The People of Palestine, by Elihu Grant

The Question of Palestine, by Edward Said

The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, by Ilan Pappé

1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli War by Benny Morris

State of Terror: How Terrorism Created Modern Israel by Thomas Suarez

They Must Go, by Meir Kahane. Yes, really.

Some people may suggest that you read The Case for Israel by Alan Dershowitz. Much like Dershowitz himself, those people are either lying or stupid. I acknowledge that the book exists. I freely admit that I have never read it and I never will. I have heard enough from people who assert that the book informed their views to know that the book is a package of lies and hasbara from start to finish. Read Kahane instead, while I obviously disagree with all of his conclusions, I will unironically say he is much more honest and intelligent than the mainstream Zionist voices in America by far. In the interests of consistency, you’ll notice that I haven’t recommended anything by Noam Chomsky either.

Web Articles

War Guilt in the Middle East, by Murray Rothbard.

The Vital Importance of Separation, by Murray Rothbard.

Top Ten Myths about the Israeli Palestinian Conflict, by Jeremy R. Hammond.

Benny Morris’s Untenable Denial of the Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, by Jeremy R. Hammond. Jeremy Hammond actually has a PDF with a collection of 12 essays besides this one and they are all excellent as a follow up to both this article and Neil Caplan’s book.

Alienation of a Homeland: How Palestine became Israel, by Stephen P. Halbrook

Ayn Rand v. Murray Rothbard: A deep dive into the Libertarian view of Israel/Palestine, by Subir Grewal

Palestine Right of Return: Sacred, Legal, and Possible, by Salman Abu-Sitta

News Sources

Haaretz

The Palestine Chronicle

The Jerusalem Fund

Foreign Policy Journal

Videos

The Truth About Israel and Palestine

Libertarians Debate Creation of Israel: Compatible with Libertarian Ideas? (I made a separate post on this video)

The Geography of Occupation

Right of Return Conference Day 1: Salman Abu Sitta Keynote

Israeli Myths & Propoganda: Ilan Pappe

Blogs

Me.

@diaspora has a reading list of his own here.

@frompalestinewithlove has her Palestine Library.

@jurhfalastini has a very large list of Full Readings on Palestine.

@aishawarma has a list of Nakba Resources as part of her larger Palestine Resources tag.

@palestinianliberator is just, in general, a good source. He’s also pointed me to The Palestine Review’s Ebook repository.

anonymous asked:

Awhile ago you mentioned you were reading quite a bit, would you mind listing the books you've been reading?

yeah definitely! idk how to put it under the cut on an ask, so sorry if this gets long, but here are the books i have finished since january 1st:

  1. Aly, Gotz. Hitler’s Beneficiaries: Plunder, Racial War, and the Nazi Welfare State. Picador, 2008.
  2. Baranowski, Shelley. Nazi Empire: German Colonialism and Imperialism from Bismarck to Hitler. Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  3. Beinart, Peter. The Crisis of Zionism. Picador, 2013.
  4. Biale, David. Eros and the Jews: From Biblical Israel to Contemporary America. University of California Press, 1997.
  5. Boyarin, Daniel. Unheroic Conduct: The Rise of Heterosexuality and the Invention of the Jewish Man. University of California Press, 1997.
  6. Brossat, Alain, and Sylvia Klingberg. Revolutionary Yiddishland: A History of Jewish Radicalism. Verso, 2016.
  7. Buber, Martin. A Land of Two Peoples: Martin Buber on Jews and Arabs. University of Chicago Press, 2005.
  8. Budnitskii, Oleg. Russian Jews Between the Reds and the Whites, 1917-1920. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.
  9. Cohen, Hillel. Year Zero of the Arab-Israeli Conflict: 1929. Brandeis, 2015.
  10. Cohen, Jack J. Democratizing Judaism. Academic Studies Press, 2010.
  11. David-Fox, Michael, Peter Holquist, and Alexander M. Martin, ed. Fascination and Enmity: Russia and Germany as Entangled Histories, 1914–1945. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012.
  12. Dekel-Chen, Jonathan L. Farming the Red Land: Jewish Agricultural Colonization and Local Soviet Power, 1924–1941. Yale University Press, 2005.
  13. Deutscher, Isaac. The Prophet Armed: Trotsky 1879-1921. Verso, 2015.
  14. Deutscher, Isaac. The Prophet Outcast: Trotsky 1929-1940. Verso, 2015.
  15. Deutscher, Isaac. The Prophet Unarmed: Trotsky 1921-1929. Verso, 2015.
  16. Dupont, Monsieur. Nihilist Communism. Online.
  17. Ferguson, Niall. Paper and Iron: Hamburg Business and German Politics in the Era of Inflation, 1897-1927. Cambridge University Press, 1995.
  18. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, and Michael Geyer, ed. Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared. Cambridge University Press, 2008.
  19. Fitzpatrick, Sheila. Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s. Oxford University Press, 2000.
  20. Fitzpatrick, Sheila, Alexander Rabinowitch, and Richard Stites, ed. Russia in the Era of NEP: Explorations in Soviet Society and Culture. Indiana University Press, 1991.
  21. Fitzpatrick, Sheila. The Russian Revolution. Oxford University Press, 2008.
  22. Gessen, Masha. Where the Jews Aren’t: The Sad and Absurd Story of Birobidzhan, Russia’s Jewish Autonomous Region. Schocken, 2016.
  23. Gitelman, Zvi. A Century of Ambivalence: The Jews of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1881 to the Present. Indiana University Press, 2001.
  24. Gitelman, Zvi. Jewish Nationality and Soviet Politics: The Jewish Sections of the CPSU, 1917-1930. Princeton University Press, 2015.
  25. Gorny, Yosef. Zionism and the Arabs, 1882-1948: A Study of Ideology. Clarendon Press, 1987.
  26. Gross, Jan. Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland. Penguin Books, 2002.
  27. von Hagen, Mark. Soldiers in the Proletarian Dictatorship: The Red Army and the Soviet Socialist State, 1917-1930. Cornell University Press, 1993.
  28. Halpern, Ben, and Jehuda Reinharz. Zionism and the Creation of a New Society. Oxford University Press, 1998.
  29. Heller, Joseph. The Stern Gang: Ideology, Politics and Terror, 1940-1949. Routledge, 2015.
  30. Hertzberg, Arthur, ed. The Zionist Idea: A Historical Analysis and Reader. The Jewish Publication Society, 1997.
  31. Hirsch, Francine. Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union. Cornell University Press, 2005.
  32. Hochschild, Adam. King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa. Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
  33. Kaplan, Eran. The Jewish Radical Right: Revisionist Zionism and Its Ideological Legacy. University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
  34. Kaplan, Mordecai M. The Future of the American Jew. Reconstructionist Press, 1981.
  35. Karp, Matthew. This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy. Harvard University Press, 2016.
  36. Kershaw, Ian, and Moshe Lewin, ed. Stalinism and Nazism: Dictatorships in Comparison. Cambridge University Press, 1997.
  37. Khalidi, Rashid. Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness. Columbia University Press, 2009.
  38. Kieser, Hans-Lukas, and Dominik J. Schaller, ed. Der Völkermord an den Armeniern und die Shoah. Chronos Verlag, 2002.
  39. Kimmerling, Baruch. The Invention and Decline of Israeliness: State, Society, and the Military. University of California Press, 2005.
  40. Kotkin, Stephen. Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization. University of California Press, 1997.
  41. Kotkin, Stephen. Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928. Penguin Books, 2015.
  42. Laqeuer, Walter. A History of Zionism: From the French Revolution to the Establishment of the State of Israel. Schocken, 2003.
  43. Liulevicius, Vejas G. The German Myth of the East: 1800 to the Present. Oxford University Press, 2010.
  44. Lockman, Zachary. Comrades and Enemies: Arab and Jewish Workers in Palestine, 1906-1948. University of California Press, 1996.
  45. Lower, Wendy. Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields. Mariner Books, 2014.
  46. Lower, Wendy. Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine. University of North Carolina Press, 2006.
  47. Mandel, David. The Petrograd Workers and the Fall of the Old Regime: From the February Revolution to the July Days, 1917. Palgrave Macmillan, 1983.
  48. Mandel, David. The Petrograd Workers and the Soviet Seizure of Power. Palgrave Macmillan, 1984.
  49. Martin, Terry. The Affirmative Action Empire: Nations and Nationalism in the Soviet Union, 1923–1939. Cornell University Press, 2001.
  50. Mazower, Mark. Hitler’s Empire: How the Nazis Ruled Europe. Penguin Books, 2009.
  51. McMeekin, Sean. The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany’s Bid for World Power. Belknap Press, 2012.
  52. Mieville, China. October: The Story of the Russian Revolution. Verso, 2017.
  53. Morris, Benny. 1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli War. Yale University Press, 2008.
  54. Morris, Benny. The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem, 1947-1949. Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  55. Morris, Benny. Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist-Arab Conflict, 1881-2001. Vintage, 2001.
  56. Moss, Kenneth B. Jewish Renaissance in the Russian Revolution. Harvard University Press, 2009.
  57. Neumann, Boaz. Land and Desire in Early Zionism. Brandeis, 2011.
  58. Nietzsche, Friedrich. Basic Writings of Nietzsche. Modern Library, 200.
  59. Nur, Ofer N. Eros and Tragedy: Jewish Male Fantasies and the Masculine Revolution of Zionism. Academic Studies Press, 2014.
  60. Pappe, Ilan. A History of Modern Palestine: One Land, Two Peoples. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  61. Petrovsky-Shtern, Yohanan. The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe. Princeton University Press, 2014.
  62. Pinkus, Benjamin. The Jews of the Soviet Union: The History of a National Minority. Cambridge University Press, 1990.
  63. Rabinowitch, Alexander. The Bolsheviks Come to Power: The Revolution of 1917 in Petrograd. Haymarket Books, 2017.
  64. Rabinowitch, Alexander. The Bolsheviks in Power: The First Year of Soviet Rule in Petrograd. Indiana University Press, 2008.
  65. Rabinowitch, Alexander. Prelude to Revolution: The Petrograd Bolsheviks and the July 1917 Uprising. Indiana University Press, 1991.
  66. Reynolds, Michael A. Shattering Empires: The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires, 1908-1918. Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  67. Rubenstein, Sondra M. The Communist Movement in Palestine and Israel, 1919-1984. Westview Press, 1985.
  68. Saposnik, Arieh B. Becoming Hebrew: The Creation of a Jewish National Culture in Ottoman Palestine. Oxford University Press, 2008.
  69. Schopenhauer, Arthur. The Essential Schopenhauer: Key Selections from The World As Will and Representation and Other Writings. Harper Perennial, 2010.
  70. Schulman, Faye. A Partisan’s Memoir: Woman of the Holocaust. Second Story Press, 1995.
  71. Scult, Mel. The Radical American Judaism of Mordecai M. Kaplan. Indiana University Press, 2015.
  72. Segev, Tom. One Palestine, Complete: Jews and Arabs Under the British Mandate. Picador, 2001.
  73. Shafir, Gershon. Land, Labor and the Origins of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 1882-1914. University of California Press, 1996.
  74. Shapira, Anita. Land and Power: The Zionist Resort to Force, 1881-1948. Stanford University Press, 1999.
  75. Shapiro, Yonathan. The Formative Years of the Israeli Labour Party: The Organization of Power, 1919-1930. Sage Publications, 1976.
  76. Shapiro, Yonathan. The Road to Power: Herut Party in Israel. SUNY Press, 1991.
  77. Shavit, Ari. My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel. Spiegel & Grau, 2015.
  78. Shavit, Yaacov. Jabotinsky and the Revisionist Movement, 1925-1948. Routledge, 1988.
  79. Shindler, Colin. The Land Beyond Promise: Israel, Likud and the Zionist Dream. I.B. Tauris, 2002.
  80. Shindler, Colin. The Triumph of Military Zionism: Nationalism and the Origins of the Israeli Right. I.B. Tauris, 2009.
  81. Shneer, David. Yiddish and the Creation of Soviet Jewish Culture: 1918-1930. Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  82. Shlaim, Avi. The Iron Wall: Israel and the Arab World. W. W. Norton & Company, 2014.
  83. Shternshis, Anna. Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1923-1939. Indiana University Press, 2006.
  84. Smith, S.A. Red Petrograd: Revolution in the Factories, 1917-1918. Haymarket Books, 2017.
  85. Snyder, Timothy. Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning. Tim Duggan Books, 2015.
  86. Snyder, Timothy. Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. Basic Books, 2012.
  87. Stalin, Josef. Marxism and the National and Colonial Question. Online.
  88. Stanislawski, Michael. Zionism and the Fin de Siècle: Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism from Nordau to Jabotinsky. University of California Press, 2001.
  89. Sternhell, Ze'ev. The Founding Myths of Israel: Nationalism, Socialism, and the Making of the Jewish State. Princeton University Press, 1997.
  90. Suny, Ronald G. The Baku Commune, 1917-1918: Class and Nationality in the Russian Revolution. Princeton University Press, 1972.
  91. Suny, Ronald G., and Lewis H. Siegelbaum, ed. Making Workers Soviet: Power, Culture, and Identity. Cornell University Press, 1994.
  92. Suny, Ronald G., Diane P. Koenker, and William G. Rosenberg, ed. Party, State, and Society in the Russian Civil War: Explorations in Social History. Indiana University Press, 1989.
  93. Suny, Ronald G., Fatma M. Gocek, and Norman M. Naimark, ed. A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire. Oxford University Press, 2011.
  94. Suny, Ronald G., and Terry Martin, ed. A State of Nations: Empire and Nation-making in the Age of Lenin and Stalin. Oxford University Press, 2001.
  95. Suny, Ronald G. “They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else”: A History of the Armenian Genocide. Princeton University Press, 2015.
  96. Troen, S. Ilan. Imagining Zion: Dreams, Designs, and Realities in a Century of Jewish Settlement. Yale University Press, 2003.
  97. Troen, S. Ilan, and Maoz Azaryahu, ed. Tel-Aviv, the First Century: Visions, Designs, Actualities. Indiana University Press, 2011.
  98. Ullrich, Volker. Hitler: Ascent, 1889-1939. Knopf, 2016.
  99. Veidlinger, Jeffrey. In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine. Indiana University Press, 2013.
  100. Weiner, Amir, ed. Landscaping the Human Garden: Twentieth-Century Population Management in a Comparative Framework. Stanford University Press, 2003.
  101. Weiner, Amir. Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution. Princeton University Press, 2002.
So you think Trump is scary?

Donald Trump is incompetent but Nixon was insane. Nixon once tried to order a nuclear strike on North Korea while he was DRUNK! 

In an entirely separate incident, Nixon, drunk a lot of the time in 1973, was passed out drunk during a critical moment when the USSR was about to intervene militarily to aid the Arabs in the Arab-Israeli war which could have triggered a full nuclear war. 

He was doped up too. He was secretly getting 1000 tab bottles of the prescription anti-seizure medication Dilantin not from a doctor but from a buddy of his who “fixed him up”. Nixon said it helped him sleep. The problem with that is that Dilantin has SEVERE negative interactions with alcohol and is known to cause suicidal ideations in 1 in 500 people who take it, that is take it without alcohol and in regulated doses under a doctor’s care. Nixon was popping them like Skittles and washing them down with whiskey.

His secretary of defense took the step of getting all of the joint chiefs together and getting a pledge from them that they would not obey Nixon’s orders to launch nukes unless they were all in unanimous agreement.

Now that is a scary story of a truly insane president.

9

With these four small interventions I am trying to tell a minimalistic story about the Palestinian refugees in Al Hussein, Amman Jordan.
By removing small areas of the “skin” of the houses I want to transform the paint chipping, produced by the passage of time, in to evocative landscapes and transmit the pride of its inhabitants through the walls.
Al-Hussein refugee camp was originally stablished in 1948 as a result of the Arab-Israeli war.

(NOTE: If you want an accurate idea of the real-life spy that Oscar Isaac will be portraying in his next film, “Operation Finale,” read this. What a story! 😱)

***

For a long time, when I was growing up in the building I still live in on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, I knew one neighbor only as Peter. Tall, bronzed and muscled, Peter lived on the 13th floor. If I was riding the elevator alone with him, he always said, “Hello, how’s your mother?” in an Israeli accent after (sometimes) removing a cigarette from his mouth. When I’d see him talking with my 4-foot-10-inch mother in the lobby, her tiny hands gripping shopping bags from Gimbels, they were so different in size that they looked absurd. Mom knew Peter was an amateur artist; she had once been in his apartment to admire his work. She was an amateur artist, too, and my father teased her that she had a crush since that time she went with him to Pearl Paint on Canal Street to buy more oils.

Then in 1986, everyone in my building found out that Peter was not only an artist; he was also a Nazi hunter. It was the 25th anniversary of the trial and hanging of Adolf Eichmann, and a wave of newspaper articles accompanied a special exhibit at the Jewish Museum. Peter the elevator charmer was none other than Peter Malkin, the former Israeli spy who snatched Eichmann off an Argentine street in 1960. Eichmann, of course, was at that time the most wanted Nazi at large — an ardent believer in the Nationalist Socialist agenda, and a former architect of the Final Solution as the SS Obersturmbannführer in charge of Jewish affairs.

The news was a big topic at my family’s dinner table. Mom was amazed that she knew nothing of Peter Malkin’s stealthy past.

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