aquarium month

anonymous asked:

I was watching tanked and I really have no respect for the way they handle fish. They made this tiny goldfish tank with nothing but an air pump. There were like 6 goldfish in that small cylindrical five gallon and i wanted to scream.

Sorry not sorry Tanked is a terrible show that involves not only the forced, awful scripted conversations and scenarios of reality TV but is also one of the only popular shows involving fish and fish care and WOW does it ever do a great job of showing EXACTLY WHAT YOU SHOULD NEVER DO. WANT A HUGE SALTWATER AQUARIUM FULL OF DELICATE FISH YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF BEFORE? BAM OK HERE YOU GO ALSO RIDE A SKATEBOARD ON THE TANK THAT’S A STRESS FREE EXPERIENCE FOR THE FISH! YOU WANT A TINY TANK FULL OF 57 GOLDFISH? WELL HERE YOU FUCKING GO ENJOY!!!!!!!!!!!! ALSO WE MAKE NO MENTION OF WATER CHANGES AND WE THROW A BOTTLE OF BACTERIA IN SO IT’S OK EVEN THOUGH A LOT OF THE FISH WE CHOOSE TO STOCK YOUR TANK WITH NEED A CONTINOUS SOURCE OF LIVE FOOD GROWN IN THE AQUARIUM THAT TAKES MONTHS TO ESTABLISH BEFORE YOU EVEN GET THE FISH AND ALSO USUALLY THESE FISH KILL EACH OTHER IN 6 MONTHS ENJOY!!!!! WE LOVE FISH!!! WE ARE FISH PEOPLE!!!!!!!! LOL

PSA: Be careful of plants in tubes

If the label says ‘semi-aquatic’ or mentions anything about terrariums, that plant won’t actually survive underwater. It’s very easy to mix them up!

A few non-aquatic plants commonly sold in aquarium sections:

Aluminum Plant (Pilea cadierei)
Aqua Fern/Borneo Fern (Trichomanes javanicum)
Borneo Sword (Aglaonema simplex)
Gold Ribbon Plant (Dracaena variegatus)
Kyoto Plant
Mondo Grass
Lucky Bamboo
Peacock Fern
Pongo Sword
Umbrella Plant (Spathiphyllum wallisii)
White Ribbon Plant (Dracaena sanderiana)

Celebrate National Seafood Month By Making Sustainable Choices

October is National Seafood Month. It’s an opportune time to celebrate the sustenance provided by the sea and also make an extra effort to enjoy sustainable seafood.

Sustainable, or ocean-healthy, seafood means it is fished or farmed in ways that are better for the environment. It also helps save other marine animals we don’t typically fish for – like sea turtles, rays and sharks – that can be mistakenly caught as bycatch.

Need help getting started? Here are three easy tips that you can follow and share with others:

  • Ask grocers and restaurants: “Do you sell sustainable seafood?” It lets them know sustainable seafood is important to you.
  • Buy Seafood Watch Best Choices or Good Alternatives. Download our free app to help inform your purchases.
  • Choose Seafood Watch partners. Find them using the Seafood Watch app and be confident about what you’re buying.
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The Changing Face of Volunteers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium
By Jim Covel, Director of Guest Experience Training and Interpretation

Over the past 30 years over 9,000 individuals have served as volunteers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. (Actually that should be 32 years, as some volunteers started a year or two before the aquarium opened!) The original concept for the aquarium included a robust corps of volunteers working side-by-side with paid staff to operate the aquarium both in front of and behind the scenes. That’s still the case, with over 1,200 active volunteers and around 550 paid staff! Volunteers are synonymous with the Monterey Bay Aquarium experience, and every guest is familiar with our volunteer divers, guides, Information Desk volunteers and others that are truly the face and voice of the aquarium for nearly two million guests each year.

Just as our audience has changed over time, there have been some shifts in our volunteers as well. The original volunteer corps consisted largely of retired individuals with a lifetime of experience and some free time to dedicate to the Aquarium’s mission. Some of those original volunteers from 30 years ago are still here at the aquarium, and they have become an enduring inspiration for the thousands of volunteers that have join us each year.


In recent years the faces in the volunteer corps have been changing. We see a growing number of high school and college students eager to learn about the oceans and support marine conservation, and to give back to their community as volunteers. Our Teen Conservation Leaders are a great example of this trend, with an exceptional group of over 120 high school students that devote their summers and weekends as docents at the aquarium. In addition, there are many more young professionals and “empty nesters” that find time in their busy lives to volunteer. As Monterey attracts students, scholars and residents from around the world, we’re also excited to have a growing number of volunteers that reflect the faces, languages and cultures from around the world. These volunteers help our international guests feel more at home when they visit.


While the face of our volunteers has been changing over the years, there are some features that haven’t been altered one bit. All those faces are still smiling as much as they were when the aquarium opened. I can’t think of anywhere else on this planet where you will encounter so many pleasant, positive and enthusiastic individuals as our aquarium volunteers. They are genuinely excited to welcome our guests to the aquarium and help them experience the marvels of Monterey Bay. And I have to tell you, as someone who has worked with those volunteers for the past 28 years, they put a smile on my face every day when I come to work. Those volunteers inspire the aquarium staff each day just as much as our guests.


As America celebrates National Volunteer Week and honors the good work of volunteers across the country, we go beyond that and make April National Volunteer Month at the aquarium. The reality is that every day is a celebration of volunteers at the aquarium. When you come to visit, it’s likely most of the people you interact with are volunteers.  If you look behind-the-scenes, you’ll see more volunteers helping to care for animals and exhibits. These are generous people that care immensely. So on your next visit to the aquarium, enjoy your conversations with our volunteers, and take a moment to join us in thanking them. Our volunteers don’t serve just to earn our gratitude, but like all of us they enjoy a heartfelt “Thank you” when they hear it.  

And if you serve as a volunteer anywhere, or have been one in the past, THANK YOU for sharing your valuable time to accomplish the important work that volunteers do for all of us!

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I’m a volunteer kelp forest vacuumer!

Hey everyone! This is Patrick on the Aquarium’s Social Media team! I was asked to share a bit about what it’s like to volunteer at the Aquarium—and that’s what you’re reading right now! Woo!  There will be fewer exclamation points soon! Here we go.

We heart our volunteers!

April is Volunteer Appreciation Month here at the Monterey Bay Aquarium—and wow, do we appreciate our volunteers. There are 400 or so paid staff members here, and over 1,500 volunteers. If you like something at the Aquarium, there’s a volunteer to thank somewhere. Thanks volunteers!

Extracurricular activities

As for me, I started volunteering at the Aquarium about seven years ago when I was a sophomore at UC Santa Cruz studying marine biology. I spent Saturday nights with rescued and rehabilitated sea otters, then cleaned up after the penguins for a while—smelly!

Volunteering with the air-breathing animals was a great way to put my studies to work. I got to meet the fin-tastic people who work here and to peer into the world of the Aquarium’s land-based activities.

But then, there was the whole underwater world of the Aquarium…

How do I do that?! — Me, then

Diving right on in

I got my answer through UCSC’s scientific diving class my junior year. The Aquarium’s excellent Dive Safety Office often hosts local scientific diving classes in the Kelp Forest exhibit to test the SCUBA-babies’ species identification and diving skills.

A few years later, with the memory of diving in the Kelp Forest exhibit still fresh in my mind, I applied to be a volunteer diver for the Aquarium, and found a spot on the Thursday B maintenance dive team—GO KILLER B’s!

There, I was welcomed by some of the most generous, hardworking, and inspirational volunteers in the whole volunteer corps. Many of these dedicated souls have been diving at the Aquarium longer than I’ve been alive, and several have been volunteers since (slightly before) the Aquarium opened!

My job sucks—kelp, that is!

Most weeks, my job on the team is to slurp up the drift kelp from the exhibit, using a siphon—basically an underwater vacuum! You can see me standing next to the assembled device at the top left, and on the right me hopping onto it to ensure a tight seal as it gets going.

Our Kelp Forest exhibit is a living, breathing, constantly exfoliating exhibit. The giant kelp on display can grow over four inches every single day, and with several dozen algae species in the same tank, there’s a lot of sloughed off detritus to pick up to keep the exhibit clean.

We do this by inching over the bottom little by little—being extra careful to move sea cucumbers aside away from the siphon hose! A good haul may be over 30 pounds of kelp that can be used to feed other animals in the Aquarium, or create excellent compost.

It’s all about the community!

Beyond getting to dive in the exhibits and helping keep them in world-class condition, the community of volunteer divers and the great times we share every shift is what keeps us coming back week after week.

When I first visited the Aquarium as kid over two decades ago, I was fascinated by the marine life and the divers inside the tank. To get to see the same expression I remember having on the faces of the next generation of five-year olds on the other side of the exhibit windows gets my cheeks extra wet and salty every time.

I’m honored to be able to dive in the footsteps of so many ocean-minded volunteers that have helped inspire me and countless others to help conserve the world ocean; and I’m so glad be able to share a bit of my story with you all.

Thanks for reading everyone! I’ll see you here at the Aquarium, online and in person. Onward!

anonymous asked:

dont move to tampa the only good thing about this town is the aquarium everything else is gross and swampy and badly designed

I went to the aquarium two months ago and there were too many kids the highlight was dippin dots

anonymous asked:

Tsundere boys Aomine--Imayoshi--Hanamiya--Midorima--Mayuzumi--Haizaki when their seemingly "frail" girlfriend carries them over the shoulder when they're being stubborn or noncompliant surprising them with their hidden strength.

Yup yup :)))) Thanks for the request! I’m garbage for the tsunderes tbh.


Aomine: “I’m not going to practice, _____.” Her eyes narrowed, and she pulled him up by his arm , slinging him over her shoulder. “Oi! ____! What are you doing!?”

“I’m taking your lazy ass to practice, Aho.” The boy smacked her on the back, demanding to be put down as she carried him to the gym. “I don’t want to, ____! Let me nap!”

Imayoshi: His eyes would open in surprise, and he instinctively grabbed onto her shirt. “_____-chan, you’re so small, are you doing some sort of strengthening drug? That’s not very good for you, you know.”

“Shouichi, I have been asking you to take me to the fucking aquarium for like three months, we’re going.” His sly smile dropped, and he huffed. “Can you at least put me down…?”

Hanamiya: “Wait, what!? Hey! Put me down, idiot!” He was going to punch her lower back, but he had more manners than that, grumbling and letting his arms hang down. “Mako, you said we would go get lunch together today. We’re doing that.”

“At least put me down! You must look ridiculous carrying me!” He shouted. “I’m throwing your food in your face, ____!”

Midorima: He just didn’t want to do anything but study, and his girlfriend was not having any of that. She tugged him up from his sitting position and threw him over her shoulder. He huffed and wiggled in surprise.

“P-put me down, nanodayo! You’ll hurt yourself!”

“Shin, I’m sorry, but you’re not studying today.” She said bluntly, missing the look of utter terror on his face. “You’re going to get ice cream with me and we’re going to go on a date, alright?”

Mayuzumi: His book fell from his hands as he was slung over her shoulder. He hummed in surprise, going over in his head how this small girl could possibly be carrying him with such ease.

“____-san, can we please walk normally?”

“I don’t know, are you going to get your nose out of that book and get ramen with me?”

Haizaki: He hit her lower back, making her grunt and accidentally knock his head against a trash can while she walked.

“Put me down! You’re making me look like a loser!”

“You are a loser.”

“_____, I swear if I am not on my own two feet in three seconds I will hurt you.” She smiled and smacked his head harder than before on a passing street lamp, making him shut up.