appropriated quotes

5

attolis eugenides + trickster archetype

“If I had a gold coin for every time I heard you say that you could do anything you wanted, I’d be rich.  As rich as–”

“As Ornon before he lost all his sheep.”

Been super busy with IRL shit but…I found out today that Alm’s VA (Kyle McCarley) voiced 9S in Nier: Automata and just…had to do get this out of my system. (Twitter ver.)

And hey, he liked it on twitter hehe ;w;

EDIT: I also found out the Japanese VA for 9S voices Alm too so this crossover is so real!!!

What’s difficult about being from Hawaii is that everyone has a postcard view of your home. Hawaii lives vividly in people’s minds as nothing more than a weeklong vacation – a space of escape, fantasy and paradise. But Hawaii is much more than a tropical destination or a pretty movie backdrop — just as Aloha is way more than a greeting.

The ongoing appropriation and commercialization of all things Hawaiian only makes it clearer as to why it is inappropriate for those with no ties to Hawaii, its language, culture and people to invoke the Hawaiian language. This is uniquely true for aloha – a term that has been bastardized and diminished with its continual use.

Most who invoke the term aloha do not know its true meaning. Aloha actually comes from two Hawaiian words: Alo – which means the front of a person, the part of our bodies that we share and take in people. And Ha, which is our breath. When we are in each other’s presence with the front of our bodies, we are exchanging the breath of life. That’s Aloha.

—  Janet Mock
3

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”
– Mark Twain

It’s a very appropriate quote for this new month because I have a brand new start (and my tabula rasa of a bujo spread is symbolic of this, haha). I’m going to launch a freelance writing business! I also thought, “Be a voice, not an echo” was appropriate, too. I can’t wait to fill it out :)

Writing is a skill that many people struggle with, and when it comes to academic essays, many people are so anxious about writing that they don’t even know where to start. Many find it easier to begin when they have a clear idea of what they should and should not be doing, so I’ve compiled some tips to hopefully alleviate your essay-induced anxieties.

1. Hooks—you don’t need one. In fact, I would argue that you shouldn’t have one. They’re a juvenile method of starting a paper and, in many cases, they involve broad generalizations that aren’t even true. “Since the beginning of literature, people have been interested in how evil characters are portrayed in novels.” Have they, really? When exactly is the so-called “beginning” of literature? What is your proof that a largely illiterate society cared about the way in which characters were depicted when people like Defoe and Behn were penning some of the first English-language novels? One could argue that most people now don’t even care about how characters are depicted in novels. Get my point? It’s juvenile, sounds lazy, and you can skip all of this by just getting to the damn point by opting to begin your essay rather than constructing a flowery hook.

2. Your thesis. In most cases, your thesis should make an argument of your own, and it should be an argument that you can prove with evidence. You could have a spectacular sounding thesis that is saturated with sophisticated claims and language, but it doesn’t matter how good your thesis sounds if you don’t have textual evidence to back it up. Further, you need to make sure that your thesis answers the question the prompt is asking—if the prompt asks you to use Rousseau’s Discourse on Inequality to access the actions of Frankenstein’s creature, you better make sure that you directly and clearly relate those two texts in your thesis statement. When constructing your thesis statement, make sure that you are addressing the prompt fully, and ensure that you have adequate evidence to back up your claims. You don’t want to get too far into an essay only to realize that you don’t have enough evidence for your argument.

3. Creating a voice in your writing. Have a strong, confident voice. Sound sure of yourself. Don’t say things such as, “This might prove why this character does this.” Make a confident argument—explain in a clear and confident manner the way in which your evidence supports your thesis argument. This is easy to do once you learn how to integrate appropriate quotes into your essays.

4. Using quotes. Quotes are necessary for most forms of essay writing; without them, your argument is weak. Provide context when introducing a quote—don’t simply throw a quote at your reader with no context or explanation. Use shorter quotes when possible, and integrate them into your sentences. Try not to let a quote stand alone as its own sentence. Here’s an example of successfully integrating appropriate quotes into your writing:

“However, Caliban openly attempted to rape Miranda, and when Prospero mentions this, Caliban enthusiastically states that if Prospero hadn’t stopped him, he would have “peopled else this isle with Calibans” (1.2.420-421). Prior to this attempted rape, Prospero and Caliban apparently shared a reciprocal relationship, wherein Prospero taught Caliban English and, in return, Caliban “showed [him] all the qualities o’ th’ isle” (1.2.403).

As you can see above, quotes are used to provide succinct evidence for what you’re talking about. They show that you have read and possess a clear understanding of the text, and they provide textual evidence that strengthens your argument.

5. The structure of your essay. Your essay does not need to be a cookie-cutter five paragraph monstrosity that has been drilled into your brain since 8th grade; you can switch it up as you see necessary. It’s not necessarily a bad thing to have paragraphs of varying lengths, multiple paragraphs discussing the same argument, or even to bring up previously stated topics and arguments in order to further explore what you’re talking about. Don’t feel obligated to constrain yourself to formulaic writing when frankly, it often isn’t the best way to write a paper. Make your argument in the most natural way possible, and if that required seven body paragraphs, then so be it. 

6. Editing your essays. I advise reading your essay out loud when editing. In your initial read-through, check for grammatical mistakes and typos. These mistakes will be obvious if you read your paper aloud. After ensuring that your paper is free from technical errors, reread it again to check how one idea transitions to the next. Does your essay have clear and natural transitions from topic to topic, or are there abrupt shifts that need to be worked out? Finally, make sure your paper adequately proves the overall argument you’re attempting to make. Is your argument the driving force in your paper, or do you make unnecessary digressions? These are all important things to consider before turning in your final essay. 

Remember, writing essays is something that, with practice, can become quite easy. Don’t treat writing an essay as some kind of foreign, impossible task; all writing an essay really involves is making an argument and attempting to prove your argument with evidence. If you can do this, then writing becomes substantially easier. Good luck!

  • Two-Bit: Ponyboy is the best, but he's 14. When he was born, I was just starting elementary school.
  • Two-Bit: If we had been friends back then, I would have been hanging out with a baby. I don't know anything about infant care!
  • Two-Bit: My God.
  • Two-Bit: I could have killed him.

anonymous asked:

This highly appropriate Tay quote just appeared on my dash lol "Being right, proving a point, or confronting someone who has hurt me doesn’t matter me to very much. I’d so much rather let them take their shots at me and regret it later in their own lives. As trite as that sounds, I try to be a lady about things. Some people love to walk up to you, say something bratty, and walk away before you can respond. I’m not naming names. There are girls out there who like doing that to other girls."

Very appropriate.

Muted Memories

“ …endings that are muted, but which echo longer in the memory than louder, more explosive denouements.” - Diane Setterfield

I am not your commodity; I am your undoing you racist fucks.
— 

Horned Serpent, an uktena

I recently rescued many spirits from the astral space of someone who was collecting and neglecting their spirits, including many spirits from closed cultures and practices. (The full story of this is now up on @refuge-of-light if you’re curious.) iThese spirits are now in my refuge as they heal from what they’ve been through.

Of course, this means that me (a white person) is interviewing a fairly decent number of Native, Indigenous, and other spirits of closed cultures and religions. The uktena belong to the Cherokee people, and Horned Serpent (the only name they would like to be referred to) requested to only work with actual Cherokee people. 

I found their story incredibly powerful. There’s a lot more to it, but this is all I am authorized to share. Please take this as a lesson in the impact of spiritual cultural appropriation. 99.9% of the time, a spirit from a closed practice/culture will NOT be pleased that you have taken it away from its people. Spirits know the history of the cultures they come from. Spirits from other cultures aren’t your commodities to collect. And in some cases (like this case in particular) they will be and are your undoing.