anonymous asked:

What are your tips for handling applying for med school? I remember seeing a post from you not too long ago (for me at least) that you only applied to one school and got in, which is something I've never heard of (the applying to one school part that is). I know people who applied to many med schools and didn't get in despite having competitive stats.

Yep, I am an uncommon breed. I did indeed only apply to one medical school.  I applied through my school’s early decision program, with the plan to apply to other places if I didn’t get an early interview. 

Applying early decision is one huge way to give yourself a leg up over all the other smart kids. My school took over 1/3 of our students from the early pool, and your chances of being accepted from EAP were 2-3 times as high as from the general pool. 

For someone like me who had sort of mediocre scores, it was great. The benefit to the school is that they know that if they accept you, you are already 100% committed to going to that school, so it’s guaranteed filled seats for them, whereas other accepted students might pick another school they were accepted to.  You can only apply ED at one school, so if there’s a place you think you have a decent shot at and that you’d be happy going to, go for it. 

My other suggestion would be to apply as widely and as early as possible if you’re really worried about getting accepted. Research schools before you apply and see what their average MCAT scores and GPAs are to see if your application will even be competitive. Also research to see if a school has a certain focus that you’re interested in, like primary care or research or if they only accept students from their own state. Those things all give you a little leg up too. 

surokei  asked:

When we are applying to be say an artist and you said we should link 3 drawings voltron related. Do they have to be Lance or can say 1 be Keith, 2 be Lance and so on and so forth? And can we add more than 3 drawings?

Hello!!

You can link us to any art at all as long as it’s not NSFW content. We recommend it be Lance related, however, as we are a Lance zine and we wanna see how you draw him! That being said, if you just have a real bangin’ Keith drawing then you can totally link that!

We ask that you keep it to three, but you can give us your art tag and/or online portfolio so we can peruse more of your work should we like to!

Thank you!

–Jessie 

College applications can be seriously stressful and overwhelming. After going through the process a few months ago and getting into both schools I applied to, I thought I’d share a few tips and a general timeline to shoot for! 

as soon as possible

  • Begin making a list of colleges you’re interested in and researching them.
  • Start thinking about what extracurriculars you want to list; drop the ones you don’t care about to give you more time for the ones you enjoy most. 
  • Think about the teachers that know you the best and ask if they would be willing to write a letter of recommendation. 

six months before applications are due

  • Narrow down your list to your top choices only.
    • There’s no point in wasting money applying to colleges you don’t want to go to!
  • Look at the Common App essay prompts and start brainstorming topics.

as soon as applications open

  • Fill out the easy parts of the application – your name, address, etc.
  • Make a list of any fields that you will need help filling out (like if you’re not sure what your advisor’s phone number is).
  • Start rough drafts of your essays, even if you aren’t sure of the topics.

three months before applications are due

  • Nail down essay topics and begin serious revisions.
  • Ask people if they would be willing to proofread your essays.
  • Visit campuses if possible, or speak to an admissions counselor to better tailor your applications to each school.

one month before the due date

  • Send essays to the people that have agreed to go over them.
  • Finish up the questions portion of the application.
  • Enter in actives and have someone proof them.
  • Begin final edits of essays.
  • Contact the teachers that are writing your letters and add them as recommenders on Common App (if that’s what you’re applying through). 

one week before the due date

  • Finalize your essays.
  • Have a parent review your application make sure all the information is accurate. 
  • Make sure all test scores, transcripts, and any other supplemental materials are in order and will be sent on time.
  • Submit your applications as soon as possible so you’re not stressing about getting it in on time!

a few things to keep in mind

  • There’s no right number of schools to apply to.
    • I applied to two, my sister applied to one, and I have friends that applied to ten. Do your research and narrow it down as much as possible to save time and money, but above all make sure that you’re happy with the schools you choose. 
  • Schools want to see applicants that are unique and passionate about something. It’s not so much about finding a student that’s done a million different things and is a member of every club, but finding one that shows dedication and individuality through their application.
  • They can tell the difference between an essay written by a high school senior or college transfer and an adult pretending to be one – don’t ever ever ever hire someone out to write yours for you. 
  • Be creative with extracurriculars if you think you don’t have enough! Everything from babysitting your siblings to coding themes counts.
  • Seriously never underestimate the importance of having other people proofread. You’ve been looking at your essays for so long that you would never catch that one bit of an old sentence sandwiched in between a new one, but someone else will. 
  • Don’t sweat it! You’ve totally got this.

applications for uk universities are coming up in a few months, so i figured i should post the tips i have collected from when i applied (since they’re all just sitting in a word document gathering dust), particularly for the personal statement! we had a talk from an admissions tutor who told us most of the stuff below + i attended 6 open days and picked up a fair few bits along the way (some stuff might be more relevant to sciences/physics)

the personal statement: what??

  • your personal statement is likely your only opportunity to try and ‘sell yourself’ to universities since most courses at most universities don’t interview
  • you send the same one to all your unis (even if you apply to different courses!)
  • 4000 characters and 47 lines limit (you’ll probably hit the line limit first - keep copying and pasting it into UCAS to check this since it’ll probably be a little different to your word processors count). the average is about 500 words

example structure

  • 80% academic, 20% extracurricular is generally a good guide
  • paragraph 1, intro: personal trigger for your interest in the subject you’re applying for! (not just ‘i’ve always been good at it/liked it’) - how your subject relates to society/current affairs if applicable and relevant (you’ll be seeing that word a lot). what aspects of the courses you’re looking forwards to (but don’t accidentally refer to something not done at all your choices) - prove that you know what you’re getting into
  • paragraph 2: what have you done to develop your interest? trips, books, wider reading - both in and out of school/college. link it to your subject! work experience, relevant volunteering. career aspirations - if you have one, put it in! it’s not set in stone just because you wrote it in a personal statement. part time job - skills gained (again, relevant ones), not just facts.
  • e.g. i worked in housekeeping part time => work under time pressure to a high standard and working effectively as part of a team
  • paragraph 3: non academic achievements e.g. duke of edinburgh - again, skills gained. if you’re doing a gap year, why/what are you doing etc - benefits?
  • paragraph 4, summary: short, just a few lines. final impression. recap - this should answer “why do you want to go to university and study your course” and “why do you deserve to be offered a place”. relevant to course - make reference to course choice/area, not generic. career aspirations are good to mention here. can keep it vague-ish for multiple courses, but course area should be clear!
  • this is just an example containing most of the stuff that should be in it - how you break it up doesn’t matter too much as long as it does have a structure (remember line breaks will influence your character/line count!)

good words/phrases

  • rewarding, improved, interested, taking part, reinforced, gained, strengthen, in addition, developed, broadening, hard work, commitment, enhanced, thrive under pressure

long list of advice

  • be concise - characters are limited and you have a lot to say
  • be honest - lying is a. unnecessary and b. will probably come out later
  • remember the person receiving this probably reads thousands, try and keep it interesting
  • organised & structured!
  • persuade the reader that you deserve a place
  • avoid generic statements - everything must be relevant. as much as they may be true, things like “i achieved good grades/always enjoyed this subject previously” are obvious fillers.
  • imagine this is your interview - as i said, you probably won’t get a real one! why do you want to study this, what makes you the right person for this course.
  • DO NOT LIST. don’t do it. expand on everything you put down, make it relevant - what your experiences are isn’t important, what you got from them is.
  • spelling and grammar. check it, check it, check it again - and this must be done by a human, spell checkers don’t notice if you use the wrong word (it’s best to go with a teacher or parent, something like that, not other students or people on the internet - be very careful about sending your personal statement to people online).
  • don’t talk about things that belong in other sections - e.g. how good your grades are (they can already see these), extenuating circumstances (should be explained by your referee in the reference). repeating yourself makes you look desperate to fill space.
  • avoid ambiguity - explain yourself! e.g. ‘i did my gold award’ - in what?!
  • authentic - don’t be pretentious
  • avoid being generic
  • ‘i’m looking forward to having an experience to remember for the rest of my life’ it lasts 3+ years; you’re going to remember it. don’t say it.
  • ‘looking forwards to independence’ - very rarely a choice when you go to uni. virtually everyone else is in the exact same situation here. don’t waste characters on things that aren’t relevant or really important.
  • ‘my family…’ they do not care about your family, they care about you. it is about you.
  • avoid cliches
  • add comments, views and explanations to your points - pretend it’s an english essay or something - making a point by itself gets you no marks
  • use your own experiences - you will have enough, don’t make it up.
  • ‘i’m quite good’ - avoid neutral or passive terms to describe yourself. be positive and show off that you do have these skills!
  • similarly don’t be uncertain - ‘i usually meet deadlines’ is pretty unconvincing
  • don’t play things down!
  • do your research - know which modules you will study in your courses so you can keep things relevant. talk about things you are particularly excited about and why.
  • what have you done outside of the a level course requirements?
  • obviously, don’t mention any of your unis by name or location (or course if they vary)
  • avoid humour: when someone makes a joke in front of a large audience, if they didn’t come to see them make jokes you will notice that maybe half laugh. you don’t know which half the person reading your personal statement will fall into. don’t do it.
  • make connections between interests and courses
  • draft and redraft and redraft until it’s perfect… and then check it over a few more times!
  • … but don’t let the people who check it over for you rewrite it! this must be your personal statement if you want to get anywhere
  • it’s run through sophisticated plagiarism/similarity software by UCAS. don’t write with a friend, don’t get one off the internet.

hopefully some of this helps someone out there, good luck!

Apply to Wild Fyre: A Keith Zine!

Our applications have now officially opened!! We take both writers and artists alike.

Applications will stay open up until September 5th! Please get your app(s) in before time runs out! Please see the links below for more info on the process, as well as for the applications themselves!

- [ Requirements / About ]
- [ Timeline ]
- [ Mobile Link ]
- [ FAQ ] ~ works for mobile 
- [ Ask ]

➵ Writer Application Form

 Artist Application Form

Good luck and happy creating!

With love,
  Your Fyre-y Mods

Hello, everyone! This has been a pretty rough year for everyone, but despite everything, the McElroy brothers and their antics have been bringing joy to us all! As a way of sharing the good feels they’ve given us, I’m putting together a fan-zine featuring full-color illustrations of the creations from their Abomination Conglomeration.

Here’s the rundown: around 24 artists will each draw an illustration of one of the Monster Factory cast. Each artist picks one of the monsters, just so we don’t end up having this turn into 23-PAMS-who-death-forgot-plus-1-Knife-Dad Zine. All the illustrations will be gathered into one zine, which will be sold digitally, and for those lovely people who chip in a little extra money as part of our preorder, physically as well! All the proceeds will then be donated to Planned Parenthood, so you get rad art while helping an awesome charity!

At the moment, we have 10 artists signed up, but have 14 spots still available! If you’re interested in contributing, please fill out the application form here VVV

 https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc8h4mn1xOeIsejTnLAutP0IHU552wgaNu94Wv85awyiAi8RQ/viewform


…and submit it to me by Sunday February 26th, 2017. After that date, applications will officially close, the sheet will be taken offline, and I will begin to sort through those who applied. It should take no more than a day or two for me to sort through, after which I will send emails out to everyone who applied, saying whether or not you got in and how to proceed!

For those who are interested in the pre-orders, after I finish setting up the artists (and their deadlines) I will be opening up a sheet for pre-orders! Here, you will be able to order digital copies in advance, or even get one of the limited run physical copies of the zine! After pre-orders close, all orders from then on will be for the digital PDF ONLY.

I look forward to hearing from you! And if you know someone who might be interested, please do not hesitate to spread the word!

Helpful tips and (free) apps for mobile devices that will help you in school and homework

Since we keep our phones and other devices on us at basically all times, they’re really accessible and useful. When it comes to school, though, these devices can become rather distracting. Sometimes in order to focus, you need to leave it in a different room! But if used correctly, your phone can actually help you do schoolwork.

Here, my friend, is a post about using your phone to help you study and do schoolwork.

Just remember that everyone works differently and focuses differently, so experiment! Try out these tips. Alter them. Try doing some and not others. See what works for you!

  1. Forest (app): This is an app that helps you focus; a tree is planted, and you set a timer. At the end of that timer, the tree has finished growing. If you use any other apps, the tree will wither and die. You can set a white list of apps that you deem productive; the app will allow these apps to be used during the focus time. At the end of each day, you have a forest of trees; it may be full of green trees, or withered trees.
    1. Use the whitelist! If music helps you focus, whitelist your music app. whitelist any homework/working apps on this list you want to use during your focus time. Whitelist your calculator. Just go through the list of apps and whitelist any that you will need.
    2. Don’t whitelist things you DON’T need. Remember the purpose of the app: to stay focused on SCHOOLWORK. Don’t whitelist things that will distract you.
  2. MyHomework (app): This app is incredibly useful. You put your scheduled classes into the app (there are tons of options for the class times; block schedules, period schedules, weekly or biweekly schedules, etc), then you add assignments, tests, homework, etc. It’s basically a virtual planner. It allows you to include priority level. Then when you go to see what assignments you have, you can sort it by priority, due date, class, or assignment type. It will give you alerts too.
    1. Widgets are miracles. This app has a widget for classes and for homework. It lets you see quickly what classes you have today, and what homework is due today, on your phone’s home screen.
    2. Get it on all your devices. It’s on everything. Kindle, Chrome OS, Android, IPhone, Mac, Windows… I don’t know about linux. 
  3. Cram (app): Basically, this app lets you make sets of flashcards virtually. It’s much easier than making paper flashcards, and it comes with you everywhere, so you can practice at any time. It comes with study programs, giving you easy ways to learn the subject fast. It also has a text-to-speech feature, and you can set one side to one language and one side to another language to help you with the pronunciation of words. It is the best form of flashcards I’ve ever used. 
  4. Duolingo (app): This is an app designed to help you learn a language like you would naturally: through a kind of submersion. It gives you little phrases and makes you translate them. When a new word is introduced, it is underlined and you may click it to see it’s definition, so you aren’t completely blind here. It also makes you do pronunciation, match words with definitions, and it has a few other activities. It doesn’t really give you lessons, it gives you practice. It has tons of languages, and it’s even going to introduce Klingon soon. One cool feature is the feedback: each language has admins, and when you don’t understand a sentence, you can ask about it in the comments. Another student, or an admin, may respond to your question with an answer.
    1. Use the desktop version when possible. The desktop version gives you access to actual basic lessons, and goes a bit more in-depth. The little sessons on the mobile phone are certainly helpful, and you will learn, but the desktop version is a bit more educational and even offers flashcards… Which the mobile version does not.
    2. It isn’t perfect. It isn’t good at grading your pronunciation, and sometimes a sentence can have two meanings, but it only accepts one. Luckily, you can always flag a question with a wrong answer, so it will be corrected by an admin. It’s a nice system.
    3. Practice daily! This app records your streaks, so you can keep track of how much you’re studying. An interesting feature in this app is fluency. If you stop practicing, your fluency number goes down. It keeps track of how well you’re doing in the lessons to track your fluency growth.
    4. Redo lessons. One interesting feature in this app is the way it makes you redo the lessons. Over time, the “strength” of each lesson goes down. You need to redo lessons for the strength to go up. This is to stop you from forgetting what you’ve learned.
  5. RescueTime (app): RescueTime is an app and desktop application. It goes on all your devices and records what you’re doing. Sounds creepy, but all it’s doing is telling you what you’re doing, and giving you a score on how productive you’re being. You mark some applications as being productive, some as neutral, some as distracting, etc, then it keeps you aware of what you’re doing too much of and what you aren’t doing enough of.
    1. Get it on EVERYTHING. For a while I only had it on my desktop, but then I found I was doing productive things on my chromebook and mobile too and I wanted those to be counted. I found that it inspired me to be much more productive with my time. On the bus, instead of playing a game on my phone, why not up my productivity with Cram? Seriously, it really makes you more productive. Get it on your phone, laptop, desktop, browser, whatever. Get it everywhere. And update to Premium if you can, it gives you a more detailed report.

Here are a few more tips for your phone in general:

Organise your apps into folders. For example, here is my homepage:

See the folders? I keep them color coded. The red folders are distracting: Social Media, Entertainment, Games. The Green ones are productive! The white and yellow are neutral.

Get widgets. They’re good at giving you quick information without having to open the app.

Experiment. Remember, everyone learns and focuses differently! Use your phone to your advantage.

Also, these are the apps that I use. There are so many other good apps. I’ve heard really good things about Memrise, a free app for learning languages that focuses on vocabulary. If didn’t include it in the main list because I’ve never used it and I don’t know much about it, but if you’re learning a language you should go check it out! I know I’m going to soon.

If you have tips or apps to add, please do!

anonymous asked:

have you ever watched your peers win the scholarships you've also applied to (and get rejected in) and feel just... really worthless? especially if you put in a lot of effort. Sometimes it's discouraging to think there's always someone out there that's much smarter than you. You don't have to reply, I just felt like venting haha.

Good evening, anonymous! Thanks for the ask!

I’ve been in similar situations many times, and it’s Not A Great Feeling.  Although you asked about scholarship applications, I hope you don’t mind if I talk about application rejections more generally.

First off, some of my more recent rejection experiences include…

  • During my first wave of graduate school applications, I was rejected unanimously. It was extremely discouraging. (Contrast this with my second wave of graduate school applications a year later, wherein I was unanimously accepted and received several amazing financial offers.)
  • Because my subfield is financially-limited, there’s a lot of people applying for a very finite pool of money. Of course, my research group needs funding if it’s going to keep doing science, meaning rejection is an expected part of the process.
  • I’ve been rejected many times over by certain research-relevant summer schools that my colleagues have attended.

And so, with these experiences in mind, I’d like to provide some…

~Advice For When Your Application Gets Rejected~

Rejection in general can be extremely painful, disappointing, and discouraging. Then add the pressure of that rejection impacting your future? Cue heartbreak.

Here are several facts that help me maintain my spirits through repeated rejections. For instance, when it comes to the persons who evaluate applications, I keep in mind that…

  • They survey a TON of people. As a result, they end up with a larger number of qualified applicants than they have available spots. Being rejected doesn’t mean you weren’t qualified. I know plenty of hyper-qualified individuals who get rejected simply because of the luck of the draw.
  • They observe only a FRACTION of you. Applications are necessarily finite, so reviewers don’t get to evaluate the whole of you. Rejection of your application is not a rejection of you. You are so so SO much more than an application.

Furthermore,

  • An application rejected by certain reviewers might be accepted by others, and vice-versa. Consequently, if you get a rejection and someone else gets an acceptance that does NOT mean they’re better than you. An application can’t enable judgments of that complexity.
  • You are growing and changing every day: the pieces of you that go into an application can be improved upon or reworked for future applications. Rejection can inform you what areas you might try to focus on in the future. 

Finally, my most IMPORTANT piece of advice is to keep in mind that…

~even the strongest applicant will receive rejections~

There’s an element of luck whenever you apply for anything. That’s the nature of these systems and it’s not your fault.

Remember:

Success isn’t a matter of always succeeding, but persevering until you do.

Best wishes, my anonymous friend.