app suggestion

Mr. Min - Chapter 05

Description:  Your CEO caught your attention the first day you started your new job and it seems the attraction is mutual.  Too bad he’s only interested in a relationship that benefits him.

Pairing: Yoongi x Reader x Jungkook

Genre: Angst and Smut

Word Count: 23,243

A/N: Eternal thanks to my number one cheerleader and motivator, @avveh, for constantly rooting for me even when I felt like banging my head on the keyboard.  Not to mention for beta reading this monster.  For anyone who can’t read this on the tumblr app I suggest checking out the AO3 link or opening it on a browser/computer.

PrologueCh 01 - Ch 02 - Ch 03 - Ch 04 - Ch 06

Keep reading

Every day, Words With Friends shows me a “match of the day” person they say they hand-picked *just for me*, and want me to play against.

The suggestions are priceless.

First of all, roughly 50% are grandmas.

Another 20% are middleaged guys with sunglasses who reeeaaally like to take selfies in their cars.

#1 looks to be in a driver’s seat, whereas #2 is in a passenger sea– … wait, are they in the same car? 

Are they double-car-sunglasses-selfie buddies?!

I’m not entirely sure what’s happening in this photo… which one’s Jolene? Is she the too-bright one in the foreground with no face?

…also, where on earth are they? Tile floor, some kind of seating, floor-mounted computer kiosk… I’m so confused.

At least this shot makes sense.

These nice people just wanted to take a selfie with the damp pavement outside their house. I mean, hey, we’ve all been there.

At first, I thought the app was just suggesting some guy named Steve, but then I looked at the photo, and – plot twist – it appears Steve might actually be his last name.

This also raises the question of what mother decided to name their kid Tyler Steve.

…and the same goes for the mother that named her son Zyngawf 34260864.

Poor, poor Pippifuzz. They’re just a ghostly outline, doomed forever to haunt the halls of Words With Friends suggestions.

Brandon doesn’t have it much better, seeing as he’s a cloud of mist next to a bridge. At least he has a semi-corporeal body, unlike poor Pippifuzz.


Fred… Fred’s seen some hard times.

…also, yes, the Bumble wants to play Words With Friends with me. I’m flattered.

As does this dog.

As does–…

…wait… Gandalf?

GANDALF!

YOU’RE ALIVE

GANDALF IS ALIVE AND WANTS TO PLAY WORDS WITH FRIENDS WITH ME

anonymous asked:

Hi Emma!😊 I just got a new Macbook Air and I was wondering if you could suggest apps for productivity( and etc.) :) Also do you know those aesthetic black clocks? Your reply will be much appreciated ❤️

Hi! How exciting!! I remember getting my first one and figuring out all the funky features :’-) Here are a few suggestions:

Hope this helps x

Kanji teacher app - free and ad-free on iOS!


This is a really nifty little thing that I use a lot. I am going to try to take the N4 test this December, so this is proving to be a really useful tool - plus, even if I won’t pass, I still get ahead of my classmates and improve my Japanese, whee!

As you can see from the top left, there are several modes to practice, all of which test you in the grid-game pictured bottom left.

  • The grey column show you the amount of kanji/vocabulary you have yet to review for the first time.
  • The red column shows you how many of those you’ve gotten wrong.
  • The blue column shows you how many of those you’ve gotten right the first time.
  • The green column shows you how many of those you got right the second time in a row!

All of the above apply to the stroke order practice too. When you draw, the app tries to guess what you were aiming for. As you can (maybe) see, I was trying to write 子, which could, indeed, as the app suggests, be a very poor attempt at ケ. Had I written it a little nicer, a little green circle containing 子 would have appeared rather than the blue one. And with all the games, you can see how well you’re doing right at the top of the screen!

Overall, this is really super useful to review on the go, though it does not have any fancy mechanics like SRS.

First Impression: Duolingo for Japanese (app)

Duolingo finally released Japanese today (although it only appears to be available on the app so far), and I decided to try it out. For reference, I’m someone who has never used Duolingo before but has studied Japanese for several years. If you’re a Duolingo expert, this might not be helpful for you.

When I first opened the app, it allowed me to take a placement test rather than start from the beginning. Below, I’ve included an example question from the test as well as a screenshot showing my placement after finishing the test. Duolingo let me skip 24 sections (I’m calling each of those circles a section).

After that, I decided to use the “test out” option on 8 more sections, which allows you to answer questions more specifically related to that topic. You get to make 4 mistakes before you fail the test and have to either start over or go through the lessons. It doesn’t take very long to go through each test if you already know the material.

Here are a couple questions from the “test out” tests. The questions either present you with an English sentence and require you to translate to Japanese or vice versa, and sometimes there are word options (as you can see above), but other times you have to type in an empty text box. I was frustrated a couple times when I was marked wrong for giving answers that were very close to what the app wanted, but overall it’s pretty good at taking multiple possible translations for each question. There’s also an option to report an error with the question if you truly believe your translation was correct.

I then decided to try one of the lessons (each section is divided into multiple lessons). I was surprised to see that the lessons are basically the same as the “test out” tests, except you can tap on each word in the given sentence to see possible translations for that one word. (You can’t tap on the words during a test.) Tapping on words definitely helps you narrow down the options when you’re picking out the translation. 

I also noticed that sometimes in the lessons, one of the words is highlighted. When you click on each character in this word, the app actually suggests a list of words that have that character in them. Below, you can see what popped up when I selected う、す、and い from うすい. 

At this point, I was starting to wonder how Duolingo actually teaches you new things, so I tried purposefully getting something wrong in the lesson mode to see what would happen. It simply said I was wrong and told me the correct translation of the sentence.

Overall, Duolingo’s Japanese course is very sophisticated. I really like being able to hear each sentence spoken in Japanese, and I appreciate the fact that multiple translations are often supported for each question. The main downside I see is that it might be hard to learn Japanese from scratch this way. It seems like you would have to learn purely through trial and error. Because of this, I think Duolingo would be best for someone who needs practice on top of a more structured learning plan from a class or textbook.

Also, I’ve almost exhausted all of the sections available in the Japanese course already, so I’m not sure if more sections are going to be added or if Duolingo just doesn’t cater to advanced learning. I will definitely keep checking back to see how the course gets updated, and I’ll try out the web version as soon as possible!

anonymous asked:

How to know what job is best for me?

First you need to know more about your personality and THIS APP can help you to know it quickly, then you can check what companies the app has suggested for you, so you can make a right decision.

It’s free for iOS and Android!

College WordBank!

There are a lot of words that may seem new and weird throughout college applications, so here is a list of words that I defined in order to help you glide through the application process!

The Basics: Treat Yo Self! (and know the facts!)


1. Undergraduate: An undergraduate student is someone who is obtaining an undergraduate education or degree, such as a Bachelor’s degree.

2. Private University: A Private University is a college that is privately funded. They tend to be smaller than public universities as well.

3. Public University: A Public University is a college that is publicly funded, specifically through the national government. They tend to be larger than private universities.

4. Safety School: When applying to colleges, a safety school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is lower than your stats, which indicates that it may be easier for you to get in (since you have higher stats than the average).

5. Target School: A target school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is similar to your stats, which indicates that you are the same level as other applicants.

6. Reach School: A reach school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is higher than your stats, indicating that it is a more competitive college.

7. College Confidential: A website full of threads and information about college admissions. Although some of the pages found on College Confidential are helpful, there are some things found on this site that may discourage you for no apparent reason, such as “Chance Me” threads. Therefore, I advise you to steer clear of College Confidential and, by all means, do not let it get to your head!

8. “Chance Me’s”: “Chance Me” are threads found online where people write their stats and ask for others to see if they can get accepted to a specific college. I advise you NOT to trust these things, as people online do not know your chances of getting into a specific school.

9. Common App: Also known as the Common Application, the Common App is an application used for undergraduate admissions to a multitude of colleges. A majority of colleges accept the Common App, but I suggest looking in on the ones you want to apply to in order to know for sure.

10. Universal College Application: Similar to the Common App, the Universal College Application is also a site used by many people to send their college applications.

11. SAT II’s: Also known as SAT Subject Tests, the SAT II’s are exams that are taken in specific subject areas, such as Biology, Math I/II, and US History. Many colleges do not require SAT Subject Tests. However, it is important to check and see if some colleges require you to take an SAT Subject Test, or if it is optional. Although it may be optional for the college, it is still your decision if you would like to take this exam or not for admission purposes.

12. Transcript: A report of all the grades you have received in each class that you have taken during high school. Colleges require an official transcript to be sent to the admissions office.

13. Recommendation Letter: A letter that details why you are an excellent fit in said college. These letters usually come from teachers, faculty, coaches, mentors, etc. Recommendation letters should NOT be written by a family member.

14. Personal Statement: A Personal Statement is basically a college essay. Many colleges require you to write at least one, while others require more than one essay.

15. Need Blind Admissions: Need-Blind Admissions is when colleges will decide on your admissions decision without looking at your financial information. To clarify, this means that the college will decide on your admissions decision solely on your application and not on your financial information.

16. Waitlisted: Waitlisted is sort of the middle ground for colleges. When you are waitlisted, it does not mean that you are accepted or rejected. Instead, it means that you are put on a “waiting list” and, if the colleges enrollment numbers from their accepted students are lower than expected, they will accept more people from the waitlist.  

17. Deferred: Deferred is when a college pushes your application to the next filing period. This means that you have not been accepted or rejected yet. Instead, the college has pushed your application in order to review it again and make a final decision. A deferral only happens if you have applied Early Action or Early Decision.

18. Legacy (Applicant): A legacy applicant is someone who is applying to a college that a family member has went to, usually their parents.


Types of Applications (it’s “ED” as one, two, three! Get it!?)


1. ED/Early Decision: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is binding. This means that if you are accepted to said college under Early Decision, you are required to go there upon acceptance. Usually, the application deadline is in November and admission decisions are in Mid-December. Something to note about this is that you can apply to only one school with an “Early Decision” (since it is binding), but you can apply to other schools with a different filing period, such as Early Action and Regular Decision.

2. EA/Early Action: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is not binding. This means that you are applying earlier than the normal application period and you will NOT be required to go to said college upon acceptance. Similar to ED, Early Action’s deadline is around November, but the admissions decision’s date varies. Unlike the Early Decision, you can apply to as many Early Action’s as you want (unless Single Choice Early Action, more on that below)

3. Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action: This is a type of application filing period where you are only allowed to apply to one Early Action school. However, this means that Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action is still non-binding (not required to go upon acceptance), but you can only apply to one school under Early Action. Similar to ED, you are able to apply to colleges under other types of filing periods, such as Regular Decision.

4. RD/Regular Decision: This is the normal time when applications are due. Regular Decision is the time when most people apply to colleges. The applications are usually due in January and results typically come out in March (although, it may vary depending on the college). Regular Decisions are non-binding and you can apply to as many as you want.

5. Rolling Admissions: This is a type of application filing period when you apply to a college and the college admissions office reviews them as they receive the applications. Unlike ED/EA/RD, Rolling Admissions does not have a set date where you can go and look for your college admissions decision. Typically, the college will give you a time frame in which they will give you your admission decision, which is possibly around 2-8 weeks depending on the college. Something to note is that a lot of colleges with Rolling Admissions may not have a distinct deadline for the application, but they will have a “priority deadline” where, if you submit your application before that date, then they will get back to you sooner. Overall, the earlier you submit your application for Rolling Admissions, the quicker you will know your decision.

6. Open Admission: This is a type of application filing where colleges accept all students, as long as they have completed high school or have a GED.


Financial Aid: Dolla Dolla Bills Y'All!


1. Grant: A grant is money that you receive in your financial aid packet that you will NOT have to pay back.

2. Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back.

3. Scholarships: A scholarship is money earned due to certain achievements, such as academic, athletic, etc. Similar to a grant, it is money given to you that you do not need to pay back. However, for a scholarship, it may be awarded by the college or awarded separately by applying for one.

4. FAFSA: Also known as the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid”, the FAFSA is a website that most colleges will advise you to use in order to receive financial aid from colleges. The FAFSA application will ask for information on your household’s tax forms in order to determine how much grant and loan money you may receive. The FAFSA application opens on January 1st of every year, but deadlines for completing the application varies for every college. Something to note is that you will need to apply for Financial Aid every year in order to receive aid while you are in college.

5. CSS Profile: Also known as the “College Scholarship Service Profile”, the CSS Profile is found on the College Board website where you apply in order to receive more financial aid. Many colleges require the CSS Profile (and sometimes early on), so I advise you to see if it is required.

6. Expected Family Contribution (EFC): This is a number found on your FAFSA that provides an estimate of the amount of money your family will be expected to pay for your education. To note, this estimate is the amount of money you will be expected to pay after financial aid is accounted for.

7. Institutional Grant: An institutional grant is money given by the college that you do not have to pay back. This is different compared to the federal grant, since the federal grant is provided by the government instead of the college itself.

8. Merit-Based Grants: These are grants that are made due to academic achievement.

9. Need-Based Grants: These grants are given to students due to their level of income.

10. Federal Pell Grant: This grant is money that the federal government gives you that you will NOT pay back.

11. Institutional Loans: An institutional loan is money given by the college that you have to pay back. This is different than the federal loans, since the federal loans are provided by the government instead of the college itself.

12. Direct Subsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Subsidized Loan is a federal loan that pays the loan’s interest while you are in college. However, once your undergraduate education is completed, you will be required to start paying the Direct Subsidized Loan (Note: this loan allows a six month grace period before you starting paying).

13. Direct Unsubsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a federal loan that does not pay the loan’s interest while you are in college. This means that, as you continue through college, you are responsible for paying the loan’s interest. However, if you decide you don’t want to pay the loan’s interest while in college, then the interest will be added to the principal (or the original loan’s amount).

14. Perkins Loan: The Perkins Loan is given to students depending on their school, as some schools do not participate in the Perkins Loan. Similar to all loans, it is money borrowed now that must be paid back later. However, unlike the other loans stated here, this loan is a college issued loan instead of a federal loan, meaning that the money is paid back to the college not the government.

15. (Parent) PLUS Loan: A PLUS Loan is a loan taken out on the parents name for an undergraduate student. This means that parents with undergraduate students may use this money for college expenses. PLUS Loans are to be paid back to the federal government.

16. Work Study Program: The Work Study Program is one in which a student may hold a job on campus while earning their degree/education. You can apply for the Work Study Program through the FAFSA application. The money you earn from this job can be used on anything, from tuition to food, etc.


You’re In College! Now what… (Everything you need to know while in college)


1. Major: A specific area that an undergraduate student focuses on during college. The student must follow and complete the courses stated in their specified major in order to receive their degree.  

2. Minor: Although it is not required, some undergraduate students choose a minor in order to have a secondary focus. If you choose to minor, you do not receive another degree. Instead, minoring in something during college is solely for your own personal interest and to expand your knowledge.

3. Double Major: When you double major in something it means that you are following two specified areas. Double Majors receive two degrees for the areas in which they studied.

4. Undeclared: To be undeclared in college is to not choose a major/degree. Many people go into college undeclared, while some are even undeclared up until their second year of college. However, depending on your college, there may be a specific time or deadline to declare a major, since you will eventually be required to have one in order to obtain a degree.

5. Placement Test: A placement test is a preliminary test in order to see what level you are in specific subjects. These are normally taken when you have selected a college to attend (as an entering college freshman) and must register for classes. Also, something to note, all colleges do not have placement tests.

6. Bursar Office: The Bursar Office is the branch of the college that takes care of payments and billing statements for the student.

7. Financial Aid Office: The Financial Aid Office is the branch of the college that takes care of the financial aid aspect for the student, such as determining grant money.

8. Registrar: The Registrar Office is where they handle student records and scheduling for the college.

9. Commuting/Commuter: A commuter is a student who travels to college from where they reside. This is a longer distance than the typical five minutes off campus.

10. Transfer Student: A transfer student is someone who is changing from one college to another. Most people who change colleges decide once they know that their credits will transfer to the next college.

Toying with a quick sketch style for ladybug characters! Feel free to send me drawing prompts, I am practicing. :)

EDIT - better quality picture!

Fairly new to digital art with any sort of tablet, but I got an iPad Pro for my birthday so here, have a messy Bakugo. I just love this boy so damn much, even if it’s hard to draw his face making asshole expressions (they’re my favorite kind).

Anyone have any art app recommendations or tips?

{Part 9} Who Are You? // Im Jaebum

Originally posted by sugaglos

Pairing: Jaebum x Reader (ft. Jackson + Jinyoung)

Genre: Angst

Summary: Back at the dorm, Jackson and Jinyoung uncover a shocking truth. But there are still missing pieces to the puzzle, and it doesn’t end there.

Please note that this scenario contains mentions of road/car accidents, amnesia and cheating.

{Part 1} // {Part 8} {Part 9} {Part 10}

This scenario contains Text Message imagines ^_^

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My Favorite FREE Apps! Very minimal and sleek designs! I use all of these apps on my Iphone, so some of them may not be available on android. Enjoy! If anyone has any apps they can suggest to me feel free to send me a message!(:

#1 // 24 Me 

Calendar / Todo List. Super easy to use with a very clean design. NO SIGN UP NECESSARY!! Im so sick of calendar apps that act more like a social media platform! 

#2 // Phonto

Photography / Typography. I used this app to make the banner above! Great for editing photos and placing text over images/backgrounds! Wide Variety of fonts and shapes! Honestly perfect for posts/blog headers!

#3 // MinimaList

List / Study Timer. Minimal and clean look. Perfect, simple to use study timer that yells at you to put your phone down! Keeps me on task and keeps track of everything I need to get done!

#4 // WeatherJams

Music. Don’t know what Pandora or Spotify playlist to choose? This app lets you listen to music based off the weather! Pick a temperature or type precipitation and it will create a playlist based off of it! Super clean, cute design and very simple to use!

#5 // Padlock

Security / Passwords. Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat….the list of social media accounts goes on and on! Keep track of your passwords with this functional app that allows you to write all your passwords in one spot! Very secure, a password must be entered to access the app! (lol just make sure you remember it.)

#6 // Pop the Lock

Game. Phenomenally simple game, all you have to do is tap the screen! If I’m stressed or anxious this is the perfect app to take my mind off of things. Very addictive though, be careful! 

#7 // iHydrate or My Water

Fitness / Water intake tracker. Both great apps for someone (like me) who does not drink enough water throughout the day! Set a goal and enter what you drink throughout the day! “My Water” has a much more sleek design, however “iHydrate” has many more free options!

If you still can’t find something feel free to ask! Also be sure to check out my study tips!

Study Strategies

“How should I study for…?”

School Supplies

General College

College Majors and Pre-Career

GPAs and Grades

Studyblr

anonymous asked:

harry x pansy social media au headcanons ? <3

This is a muggle au for the @slytherdornet and @hprarepairnet Summer Vacation Challenge!
You can also find this drabble on AO3.
Note: I HIGHLY enjoyed writing this. It was very humorous for me, and Harry James Potter is clueless. I love my son, and I love my daughter. This is dedicated to @provocative-envy cause I know she’ll appreciate this. 

Harry didn’t understand social media, just like he didn’t understand girls. He was awkward, and he knew it. But Ron insisted that he needed to find someone and try one of the popular dating apps. He needed to get laid this summer; it was finally time.

The only problem was that Harry didn’t know what social media apps were actually dating apps and what ones were strictly for over-sharing your life to strangers. He was too embarrassed to ask Ron for clarification, because he learned quickly that he actually did in fact live under a rock. He didn’t want to deal with Ron’s shocked expression and the constant teasing for months to come.

So, he scrolled through his new iPhone’s app store, and he rubbed his temple in frustration as he downloaded all the free popular social media apps he could think of. He took a drink from his black coffee and concentrated on how it felt flowing down the back of his throat. It was a nice distraction for a moment, before he decided to open up Instagram.

He heard this was the app that people his age liked to post pictures of their Cappuccinos on, and he stared at the Starbucks cup in his hand. 

People found this entertaining? He thought to himself. Why would anyone want to follow this pointless trend?

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anonymous asked:

How to know what job is best for me?

First you need to know more about your personality and THIS APP can help you to know it quickly. Then you can check what companies the app has suggested for you and apply for the ones that you like the most. 

It’s free for iOS and Android!

Attention all NCT fanfiction writers! Have you ever wanted someone to brainstorm with? To scream about your OTP’s with? To share prompts and alternative universes with? Well then this is the network for you!

A group chat will be made using LINE Messenger (or another messaging app if suggested!) in order for us all to get to know each other more ♥ If the group chat is successful then I would like to make a tumblr to share writers work as well as giving challenges and prompts for people to choose from! I haven’t decided on any rules/number limit so it will hopefully be discussed with members soon!

HOW TO APPLY:

Please reblog this post to spread the word and submit this information to me:

  • Your Name
  • Age
  • Country
  • Preferred Pronouns
  • Favourite Ships
  • Writing Account (ao3/aff/if applicable)
  • LINE ID