app photo

self care tips for the signs
  • *check sun, moon and 6th house
  • aries: fall asleep to nature sounds, go out for a small run, make plans with a friend at least twice a week
  • taurus: change your sheets, pillowcase and duvet cover, get a calendar and highlight important events, take an instagram-worthy bath with a bath bomb
  • gemini: meditate or pray even just for ten minutes every day, read your favourite children book, wear fluffy jumpers / socks
  • cancer: eat something healthy like a piece of fresh fruit, light a candle that smells comforting, write a love letter to anyone you want
  • leo: call or text someone you love, listen to music while doing your daily activities, put on clothes that make you feel confident
  • virgo: delete unnecessary apps and photos from your phone, reorganize your bookshelves by author, colour or whatever you prefer, wash your hands with warm water and soap
  • libra: do a hair and / or face mask, make yourself a cup of tea, spend some time with your family and / or pets
  • scorpio: go to sleep around the same time every night, spritz your favourite perfume, try out a new recipe
  • sagittarius: open the windows and let fresh air in, put all scattered clothes in a loundry bin, read interesting news articles
  • capricorn: clean your room or part of your house, drink a huge glass of fresh water, sleep without pants
  • aquarius: avoid using electronic devices before bed, stretch your back and arms every day, take any medication or vitamins if you need to
  • pisces: check emails and clean up your inbox, moisturize your hands and feet, physically wrap yourself in a soft blanket

Wow really calm down, we’re not studyblrs to develop business strategies… “Best times to post your studyblr things”, “ must have app for photo editing” wtf when did we loose the meaning of our community?? Learning with pleasure and getting support to keep doing so???
I see more and more posts like that and it makes me sick. You know what I’m not here for reblogging *aesthetic* (fake?) posts anymore. I’ll browse the studyblr tag. You know, the “recent posts” not the popular ones with over 1k notes. I’ll support them. I’ll try my best to do my job over here and bring a little support when I can. Have a good night you all.

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Merci @lunoday d'avoir sélectionné cette photo pour en réaliser une interprétation très sensible. Les couleurs et le fond sont très réussis. L'ensemble est vraiment magnifique !!       Rose :))

Thank you @lunoday for selecting this photo to make a very sensitive interpretation. The colors and background are very successful. The whole is really beautiful !!     Rose  :))

Source : @lunoday

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My Brother, My Brother, and Me (dir. J.D. Amato, 2017)

Activities for Different Energy Levels

I have been in a low-energy state so frequently lately that I feel like I’m accomplishing nothing and contributing nothing to my life or anyone else’s. To try to combat this, I made a list of things I like to do (or don’t hate doing) that can help me get through a day. The less time you waste trying to decide what to do with your time, the better, because that shit is so exhausting.

I felt like I’d share this in case anyone wants some ideas for when you feel totally overwhelmed, exhausted, bored, and frustrated. Here goes!

Low Energy

▪ Listen to audiobooks or podcasts
▪ Edit photos on apps like pixlr or instagram
▪ Look up and bookmark some recipes you’d like to make soon
▪ Play guitar, laying down if needed
▪ Research or plan out future volunteering
▪ Read about meditation from a book or article
▪ Research or plan out steps needed to do a future DIY or art project
▪ Do some light stretching while laying down or sitting
▪ Do some basic chair yoga or tai chi while following an instructional YouTube video
▪ Bookmark new resources for managing symptoms
▪ Make lists or draw diagrams of things you’re interested in
▪ Watch a Ted Talk or informative video
▪ Read using a kindle or book
▪ Scan through previously bookmarked resources
▪ Watch YouTube videos you’ve marked as “Watch Later" 


Medium Energy

▪ Build a model from a kit or printed paper template
▪ Socialize via text or online social media
▪ Research future volunteering opportunities or Return to Work programs
▪ Organize, rearrange, tidy up a section of your personal area 
▪ Make plans for later this week or next week
▪ Manage medication: call doctors, pharmacy. Refill your pill calendar.
▪ Install updates on your computer
▪ Take a long, hot shower. Use nice soap.
▪ Filing: sort your papers into their folders.
▪ Spend some time with a pet, cuddle.

High Energy

▪ Socialize in-person
▪ Learn something new: languages, coding, coping techniques, art, new music, DIY projects.
▪ Cook something healthy for today or for the week.
▪ Creative projects: start one and do your best to finish it.
▪ Plan something and execute it, no matter how small. Bonus points if there is a tangible proof of accomplishment like a model or painting or a song you learned.
▪ Go walk around the mall or Target. Doesn’t matter where, you don’t have to buy anything, just get out of the house and walk a little.

The Performative Wokeness of Dear White People

“I plan to marry me a dark-skinned sister. Have the ashiest, blackest babies possible.” Says the character of Reggie (Marques Richardson) to his group of friends as they’re taking a stroll on the campus of Winchester University, the fictional university set in the world of Dear White People. Reggie’s proclamation came during a conversation about the character of Sam’s (Logan Browning) new white boyfriend.

The statement echoes a conversation that Sam has earlier in the series with her group of friends where she says that she prefers her men like she prefers her coffee “full-bodied with preferably Keyan origins.” Prompting Muffy (Caitlin Carver) to ask Sam, in Muffy’s words, “a dumb white girl question,” why it would be racist if Muffy was to only date white men, but not racist for Sam to only date black men. Sam goes onto explain that there are parts of her identity that white men will never understand in the ways a black man could. However, Sam does eventually start dating a white guy named Gabe (John Patrick Amedori), who only after being outed on his Instagram account, does she go public with.

Sam’s relationship with a white man becomes a point of contention for many of her closest friends, sparking an ongoing discussion in the series of whether a black person can really be pro-black, while also having a white significant other.

Reggie’s politics, however, are never challenged in the same ways that Sam’s are. His declaration of love for dark-skinned women, is dead upon arrival considering that the only other thing that he is known for outside of his pro-blackness, is his crush on Sam. A light-skinned biracial woman.

Based on the 2014 movie of the same name, Dear White People is a satire set at a PWI about college campus politics through the lens of black students. The show also explores the theme of identity. How often people assume identities or have identities projected onto them that contradicts who they really are. Identities such as being“woke.”

Used to describe a person who is socially and politically conscious, the word “woke” has surged in popularity within recent years due to social media and the rise of social movements such as Black Lives Matter. But what once was a way to describe someone’s political awareness, being, or staying woke, has seemingly dissolved more into a competition of who is more educated on race and other social issues.

Performative wokeness is examined within the world of Dear White People, with episode five featuring a scene where Reggie shows off an app he created called Woke or Not. The app shows photos of students at Winchester University and with a push of a button app users can determine whether a person is woke. Or not.

Even though Dear White People pokes fun at the absurdity and arrogance that comes from people who think they have the moral authority to decide who is or isn’t woke, the show itself falls into many of the same traps that it attempts to satirize.

In an episode centered around Gabe, he’s sitting at a table surrounded by Sam and other black women while they discuss white male privilege and how women of color are often passed over for opportunities that usually end up being given to mediocre white men. While he’s silently listening on, Gabe imagines himself banging his fist against the table as he looks directly into the camera and exclaims that sometimes people actually earn the things they get and that just because he’s a white man doesn’t make him an “asshole.”

“Asshole,” of course, seems just a tad bit reductive considering that being an “asshole” in this scenario is about benefiting from a society that prioritizes average white men over hard working black women. While the narrator says that only “a tiny part” of Gabe wishes he could make such a statement, it’s still concerning that Gabe, who is supposedly enlightened on issues of racism and sexism, is secretly harboring resentment against women of color for venting their frustrations about the institutions that systematically hold them back from opportunities

Is it possible that Gabe is being used as a conduit to discuss liberal racism? After all, episode five deals with how even “good” white people can be guilty of the same racism that they like to think they’re above. But this wasn’t Gabe’s first time making racially tone deaf statements without being taken to task. In the first episode, Gabe tells Sam that he wouldn’t let his friends make her feel like she didn’t belong in his “world,” after Gabe’s first uncomfortable meeting with Sam’s friends where he made a series of half-hearted attempts at trying to relate to the struggles of black students.  

 However, the most egregious occurrence of Dear White People’s lack of self awareness about their own performative wokeness comes with their handling of discussions surrounding colorism.  

The most improved upon element from Dear White People the movie is the colorism. In the movie, the character of Coco (Teyonah Parris,) a dark-skinned black woman, existed solely as a foil to Tessa Thompson’s version of Sam, a light-skinned biracial woman. With the movie being turned into a series, we see Coco, now played by Antoinette Robertson, develop into a fleshed out, fully realized character. But even with the series upgrading on the movie’s shortcomings, even going as far as calling Sam out on her light-skin privilege, the series began developing flaws of their own in regards to its colorism.

Joelle (Ashley Blaine Featherson) outside of being Sam’s best friend, also has feelings for Reggie, the guy who has feelings for Sam. This scenario is reminiscent to a flashback scene in episode four in which Coco longingly looks on as Troy, (Brandon Bell) a guy she has feelings for, flirt with Sam. Even though in that particular situation, the scene was a part of an episode that explores Coco’s relationship to colorism and how it affects her love life, the same motivation doesn’t appear to be behind the love triangle of Sam, Joelle, and Reggie.

The fact that the only light-skinned biracial woman of the show is constantly shown as the object of affection, while the two principle dark-skinned women of the show are depicted as coveting over color struck black men who constantly overlook them for said light-skinned biracial woman is disheartening to watch.

What makes this even more disheartening, is the fact that Joelle was walking right beside Reggie, struggling to contain her smile, as he declared that he was going to “marry him a dark-skinned sister,” only later to hook up with Sam. But Joelle, nor does anyone else, call him out about how his preference doesn’t align with who we actually see him dating.

Has Dear White People found itself stuck in the same tiny confines of identity that it sought out to expose through its characters? Can the contradictions that arise within the show merely be chalked up to poor writing? Or does it prove that inconsistency will inevitably happen when trying to voice the concerns of multiple people with varying opinions? A light skin woman can not speak to the struggles of colorism that a dark skin woman faces. A white man can’t relate to the problems a black man has. And one show cannot voice the opinions of all within a community.

I have always wanted to draw Ravio but I didn’t.
I finally drew him now.
He’s a cute boy.