apology to the american people

Max has stated his parents are not from America. He clearly knows a lot about Indian clothing and outfits. The entire beginning bit of The Order of the Sparrow was a jab at dumb white people who call Native American people ‘Indians’ when in reality, they are not, white people are dumb (I am a white person and I can tell you, we are dumb), and Indian people are from, you guessed it, India.

His family tree clearly originates in India.

Waiting on Colbert’s apology tonight...

Sean Spicer is an arrogant blowhard who lied repeatedly to the American people on behalf of a xenophobic, racist, misogynist, narcissistic sociopath. This is the same guy who said Hitler didn’t resort to using chemical weapons – why would anybody invite him to anything ever again?

And he tried to steal a mini-fridge for his office from lowly staff who don’t even have Mess Hall privileges.

He’s a disgusting human being who shouldn’t be embraced and welcomed by the same people who were just railing against his contributions to the destruction of American democracy less than two months ago. He doesn’t get brownie points because he finally quit his job, especially since he wasn’t quitting because he had enough of President Velveeta – he quit because he didn’t want to work with another big baby the administration hired for the Press office.

Spicer is the same terrible person he was when he was on television everyday lying to us. None of that changes because he recited a joke at an awards ceremony. The fact that Stephen Colbert came up with this gag (after he *just* told Jimmy Kimmel that Sean Spicer doesn’t deserve forgiveness because you have to have regret in order to be forgiven and Spicer doesn’t regret anything) is the kind of slap-in-the-face hypocrisy that makes me question every “ally” who doesn’t actually have skin in the game.

You can say all the right words and have all the right talking points and support all the right causes, but when push comes to shove, do you care enough to actually stand on principle when faced with the opportunity to be a trending topic? When your race, gender, wealth, or a combo insulates you from the effects of this administration, are you really here for the cause or are you just saying the right things? Colbert chose the route to Monday’s Water Cooler Moment instead of staying the course set by his own words. And it’s not cool.

9/11/01

I was asleep in bed when my wife called and said, “turn the tv on, people are flying planes into the world trade center.”  Life in this country changed forever that day. 

Only 16 years later people have forgotten and apologize for being American and willingly invite people into our country who would do us harm, due to some misguided hatred of America. 

We have been at war with evil ever since. We are the only people capable of toppling this country, no foreign power can accomplish this. 

Never forget,

Mitt Romney’s statement

“I will dispense for now from discussion of the moral character of the president’s Charlottesville statements. Whether he intended to or not, what he communicated caused racists to rejoice, minorities to weep, and the vast heart of America to mourn. His apologists strain to explain that he didn’t mean what we heard. But what we heard is now the reality, and unless it is addressed by the president as such, with unprecedented candor and strength, there may commence an unraveling of our national fabric.

"The leaders of our branches of military service have spoken immediately and forcefully, repudiating the implications of the president’s words. Why? In part because the morale and commitment of our forces — made up and sustained by men and women of all races — could be in the balance. Our allies around the world are stunned and our enemies celebrate; America’s ability to help secure a peaceful and prosperous world is diminished. And who would want to come to the aid of a country they perceive as racist if ever the need were to arise, as it did after 9/11?

"In homes across the nation, children are asking their parents what this means. Jews, blacks, Hispanics, Muslims are as much a part of America as whites and Protestants. But today they wonder. Where might this lead? To bitterness and tears, or perhaps to anger and violence?

"The potential consequences are severe in the extreme. Accordingly, the president must take remedial action in the extreme. He should address the American people, acknowledge that he was wrong, apologize. State forcefully and unequivocally that racists are 100% to blame for the murder and violence in Charlottesville. Testify that there is no conceivable comparison or moral equivalency between the Nazis — who brutally murdered millions of Jews and who hundreds of thousands of Americans gave their lives to defeat — and the counter-protestors who were outraged to see fools parading the Nazi flag, Nazi armband and Nazi salute. And once and for all, he must definitively repudiate the support of David Duke and his ilk and call for every American to banish racists and haters from any and every association.

"This is a defining moment for President Trump. But much more than that, it is a moment that will define America in the hearts of our children. They are watching, our soldiers are watching, the world is watching. Mr. President, act now for the good of the country.”

For the dignity of the American people Obama should apologize.
But, Japanese people will not ask nor request for an apology.
If America will grow up, Obama will decide for himself to apologize for Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks.
But America has such a short history of only several hundred years, so we need more time.
Besides the atomic bomb attacks, America bombed so many cities including Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and more at least 200 cities to kill more than 300,000 to some 900,000 innocent citizens in Japan.
Nagasaki was attacked during Morning Mass at the Urakami Catholic Church, killed hundreds of Catholics. If this is not a war crime what is a war crime?


http://gu.com/p/4jf6p/stw


https://twitter.com/shinjihi/status/735045830629986304

米国の尊厳の為にオバマさんは謝罪すべきでしょう。 ただ、日本人は謝罪を頼んだり求めたりはしません。 アメリカが大人になればオバマさんは自ら広島と長崎への攻撃について謝るでしょう。 しかし、アメリカは数百年しか歴史の無い国で、まだ時間が要ります。 広島と長崎の原爆以外に東京、大阪、名古屋など200以上の都市への空襲で30万人から90万人もの無辜の一般市民が殺されました。 長崎ではカソリック教会浦上天主堂が朝のミサの最中で数百名のカソリック信者が殺されました。 これが戦争犯罪で無ければ何が戦争犯罪なのでしょう?
Montreal

The other day, I was watching a video that showed the Bruin’s fans doing a standing ovation for the Canadian Anthem. They did it because Habs fans booed the American Anthem during their last game. Yes, it was fucking immature from them to do that. I don’t understand and hate people who disrespect others. I apologize to the Americans for that stupid action. But, what upset me was the comments from the English-Canadians saying that Montreal wasn’t really part of Canada. That, Montrealers are arrogants who think that they are better than the rest of the country. I know that it wasn’t the proudest moment of our History but can you please shut up? Not everyone from Montreal act like drunk and frustrated fans in the Bell Centre, okay? I agree that there is assholes in Montreal, I met many of them, but I’m sure that those kind of people exist everywhere. I actually hate a part of the Habs fans. BUT, Montreal is way more than “Canadiens fans”, we are proud of our culture and differences. Yes, we are not like other provinces, we like to be called “Québécois”, we speak french not english, etc. Despite all of that, we are Canadians as much as the people from Toronto or Vancouver. So please, don’t ever judge a whole city based on some immature hockey fans.


Sorry for the mistakes

Anderson Cooper: Thank you, Mr. Trump. The question from Patrice was about are you both modeling positive and appropriate behavior for today’s youth? We received a lot of questions online, Mr. Trump, about the tape that was released on Friday, as you can imagine. You called what you said locker room banter. You described kissing women without consent, grabbing their genitals. That is sexual assault. You bragged that you have sexually assaulted women. Do you understand that? 

Donald Trump: No, I didn’t say that at all. I don’t think you understood what was – this was locker room talk. I’m not proud of it. I apologize to my family. I apologize to the American people. Certainly I’m not proud of it. But this is locker room talk.You know, when we have a world where you have ISIS chopping off heads, where you have – and, frankly, drowning people in steel cages, where you have wars and horrible, horrible sights all over, where you have so many bad things happening, this is like medieval times. We haven’t seen anything like this, the carnage all over the world. And they look and they see. Can you imagine the people that are, frankly, doing so well against us with ISIS? And they look at our country and they see what’s going on. Yes, I’m very embarrassed by it. I hate it. But it’s locker room talk, and it’s one of those things. I will knock the hell out of ISIS. We’re going to defeat ISIS. ISIS happened a number of years ago in a vacuum that was left because of bad judgment. And I will tell you, I will take care of ISIS.

Anderson Cooper: So, Mr. Trump… 

Donald Trump: And we should get on to much more important things and much bigger things. 

Anderson Cooper: Just for the record, though, are you saying that what you said on that bus 11 years ago that you did not actually kiss women without consent or grope women without consent? 

Donald Trump:  I have great respect for women. Nobody has more respect for women than I do.

Anderson Cooper: So, for the record, you’re saying you never did that?

Donald Trump: I’ve said things that, frankly, you hear these things I said. And I was embarrassed by it. But I have tremendous respect for women.

Anderson Cooper: Have you ever done those things?

Donald Trump: And women have respect for me. And I will tell you: No, I have not. And I will tell you that I’m going to make our country safe. We’re going to have borders in our country, which we don’t have now. People are pouring into our country, and they’re coming in from the Middle East and other places.We’re going to make America safe again. We’re going to make America great again, but we’re going to make America safe again. And we’re going to make America wealthy again, because if you don’t do that, it just – it sounds harsh to say, but we have to build up the wealth of our nation.

Anderson Cooper: : Thank you, Mr. Trump.

(source)

3

David Spatz - A lot of people spoke out against the war. Especially people in the entertainment industry. But why did they single out you?

Eartha Kitt - But I was the first to have done it in the WhitehouseI was asked about my opinions of the problems among of the young people in America at that time. That was the question of the luncheon. And 50 of us ladies who worked in the different communities across America and me also in foreign countries like the Aboriginals in Australia and the Canadian Indians. I’m working with these people all the time. Therefore I know what their feelings are. So when they asked the question of what is the basic problem and you tell them? You find they don’t want to hear that. They want to hear how are we doing? Am I getting a good credit for putting flowers along Route 66, you know? Not the real problems. This is also one of the things what I feel is going on now. As I told Mrs. Johnson at the luncheon: this was not a point of getting up ranting and raving. I’m talking to her as I am talking to you. The point we are going through now is they do not realize how much anger there is among the America people..then when Seymour Hersh called me in 1974, January. And said this is what we found that president Johnson had decided that you should not be seen anywhere. That is why you were having a hard time getting workMy side was never told. What did they want me to do? Apologize? The news media wanted me to do that. And I said I think THEY needed to apologize to the American people because they know we shouldn’t be involved in that war. [x]

time.com
Petition Calls for 'Maze Runner' Cast to Apologize to Native Americans
Anger after an actor implies artifacts were taken

More than 34,000 people are calling for the cast and crew from Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials to apologize to Native American tribal leaders after allegedly removing artifacts while filming on location.

The film was being shot in Albuquerque, N.M., on an ancient Pueblo burial ground. Fans have expressed outrage in a petition after actor Dylan O’Brien said that, while the cast was told not to, “everyone just takes stuff, obviously.”

One of O’Brien’s fans started the petition, telling the Santa Fe New Mexican she didn’t want to just excuse his behavior because he’s famous.

anonymous asked:

African Americans aren't just a monolithic culture. And we didn't just pop up on US soil one day completely separate from Africans. You guys kind of forget that sometimes, and when you talk about us sometimes you just talk about us like we're just ONE group with ONE (or no) culture, and whatever doesn't fit your idea of what we can and can't have gets labeled as "stolen". Remember we still kept parts of our cultures with us, and made new ones and fight tooth and nail to keep both.

I can see where you are coming from and I apologize if I have stated African American cultures as monolith. Regardless, people still can’t go around mixing random cultural fabrics, designs, symbols, etc and think the people of that culture are going to be hunky doory. I am aware the various African American cultures have traditions deeply rooted from Africa, but a lot of people are doing it for fashion not knowledge.

I sometimes see Black Americans who are totally Afrocentric who’s last African family connection ended during the 13 original colonies wearing various traditional African cultural patterns meant ONLY to be worn for certain events and in a certain way… and don’t get me started on the proper way to put it on.

*this next paragraph isn’t for you asker, anon*

Also, STOP SPELLING AFRICA WITH A DAMN “K”. We’re fucking sick and tired of you fake woke “Afrikans” who “descended from Egyptian royalty”, silencing us when we say to spell our continents name correctly. YOUR NOT FUCKING RECLAIMING ANYTHING BECAUSE A SHIT TON OF COUNTRIES IN EUROPE SPELL AFRICA WITH A “K” AND TO TOP IT OFF THE OPPRESSIVE WHITE GROUP IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE CALLED “AFRIKANERS”. Just respect the majority wish and spell it correct.

XoXo, Susie

  • friend: hey what's up?
  • me: oh nothing, just waiting for the U.S. government to offer an official apology for the 18 million native peoples they killed during the American Indian Genocide and also the fact that they refuse to acknowledge it as a genocide because the U.S. doesn't want to bare the burden of having murdered around 7 million more people than Hitler did during the Holocaust.

Take it this way: In 2011, white men constituted over 69% of those arrested for urban violence and yet black men made up for the majority of the prison population thanks to the American prison industrial complex. The majority of school shooters and mass murderers in the United States are white men (97% of them being male and 79% being white) from upper-middle class backgrounds. But for some curious reason, Twitter or Facebook or even your favorite news channels have not seen a flood of apologies from white men under the hashtag #NotInMyName. I already expect indignant comments to tell me that these men were lone cases who had mental disorders and no friends because it’s the go-to reason when a white man decides to shoot schools up. Unfortunately, brown and black men cannot use the same excuse. Furthermore, white communities do not worry for their well-being when a white person is indicted with a crime the way non-white communities do. Similarly, when American soldiers go on killing sprees in Afghanistan and other lands under siege, we do not witness social media inundated with American soldiers tweeting #NotInMyName. If anything, we rarely hear of such bloodsport. When Mike Brown was murdered by officer Darren Wilson, we did not see white Americans tweet #NotInMyName to highlight the utter barbarity of Wilson’s racially motivated attack. But we did see over $50,000 donations go to Wilson and the cash came out of white pockets. This list goes on and so does the violence but the apologies never make an appearance. Mass culpability seems to apply to Muslims only in the post-9/11 world.

Let me make it clear to anyone expecting an apology from me: There is none.

I will apologize for ISIS when every single American apologizes for the production of the War on Terror that, like the brilliant Iraqi poet Sinan Antoon says, is the production of more terror and thus, endless war. I will apologize for ISIS when every single white American apologizes for the mass incarceration of black and brown people in the United States. I will apologize for ISIS when I see American men and women post lengthy and introspective apologies for what the US Empire has done to the world, including my native country, since its very advent. I will post an 8,000 word apology when English people email me individual apologies for what the British Empire did to the subcontinent. I will carry a banner around Union Square that reads “I condemn ISIS as a Muslim and everything else you think I’m responsible for because I share an identity with someone else” when I start seeing white Americans wearing shirts that read “I condemn the KKK, slavery, plantations, gentrification, the genocide of Native Americans, the internment camps for East Asians, the multiple coup d’etats my country facilitated abroad, the other 9/11 that Chileans suffered and yet everyone and their mother forgot, Christian fundamentalists who can’t pronounce Mohammad but think all Muslims need to be racially profiled and segregated from the rest of America and a lot more as a white person.” I won’t limit this to whiteness only; I will apologize when every single ethnic, religious group apologizes for whatever someone did simply because, under this debauched logic, they owe the world an apology for sharing an identity. When I start seeing these apologies, I will apologize too.

Until then, no apology.

—  Mehreen Kasana, American Pakistani Muslim writer, blogger on Muslim culture/politics enthusiast in her MUST Read article entitled, “No Apology”, here she writes on where the white people on #Notinmyname regarding terrorism done on their behalf, regarding Darren Wilson and racist attacks on blacks, Muslims and other POC. 

a recent study shows that 98.3% of people who make posts like “we white people have no culture” or “i want to apologize on behalf of all white people” are american

COOPER: Thank you, Mr. Trump. The question from Patrice was about are you both modeling positive and appropriate behavior for today’s youth? We received a lot of questions online, Mr. Trump, about the tape that was released on Friday, as you can imagine. You called what you said locker room banter. You described kissing women without consent, grabbing their genitals. That is sexual assault. You bragged that you have sexually assaulted women. Do you understand that?

TRUMP: No, I didn’t say that at all. I don’t think you understood what was — this was locker room talk. I’m not proud of it. I apologize to my family. I apologize to the American people. Certainly I’m not proud of it. But this is locker room talk.

You know, when we have a world where you have ISIS chopping off heads, where you have — and, frankly, drowning people in steel cages, where you have wars and horrible, horrible sights all over, where you have so many bad things happening, this is like medieval times. We haven’t seen anything like this, the carnage all over the world.

And they look and they see. Can you imagine the people that are, frankly, doing so well against us with ISIS? And they look at our country and they see what’s going on.

Yes, I’m very embarrassed by it. I hate it. But it’s locker room talk, and it’s one of those things. I will knock the hell out of ISIS. We’re going to defeat ISIS. ISIS happened a number of years ago in a vacuum that was left because of bad judgment. And I will tell you, I will take care of ISIS.

COOPER: So, Mr. Trump…

TRUMP: And we should get on to much more important things and much bigger things.

COOPER: Just for the record, though, are you saying that what you said on that bus 11 years ago that you did not actually kiss women without consent or grope women without consent?

TRUMP: I have great respect for women. Nobody has more respect for women than I do.

COOPER: So, for the record, you’re saying you never did that?

TRUMP: I’ve said things that, frankly, you hear these things I said. And I was embarrassed by it. But I have tremendous respect for women.

COOPER: Have you ever done those things?

TRUMP: And women have respect for me. And I will tell you: No, I have not. And I will tell you that I’m going to make our country safe. We’re going to have borders in our country, which we don’t have now. People are pouring into our country, and they’re coming in from the Middle East and other places.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you the most shameless, most obvious, and hilariously nonsensical Red Herring the world has ever seen. 

I still can’t believe that he would be brazen enough to try this, but then, it’s Trump, who is completely beyond shame. The fact that no one calls him out on it makes me want to bash my own head against a wall. Repeatedly. How can you let him get away with this. Seriously. For this alone, this guy deserves to be tarred and feathered and run out of the town hall. 

You need an example for a non sequitur? This is it. This is the only example you will ever need. This is so non sequitur that he might as well be talking about balloons. 

eirthbndr  asked:

I do not like Obama because I feel he is incompetent. He does not seem to care about domestic issues. He could help in the situation in Missouri, but he has said next to nothing. As a leader of the United States and in the African-American community, he is obligated to put forth something. I just feel as though he doesn't care about his own citizens, and worries more about our image to the outside world. But of course, I'm the ignorant, self-centered American for wanting better domestic policy.

Please don’t say that you’re being “self-centred”, you elect your leaders to serve you and I do feel your criticism about his response to Ferguson is legitimate. I did not ever mean to suggest that Americans who criticised Obama were being selfish or ignorant of the bigger picture. I do agree Obama should say more because even though the US is a federal state, American history is littered with examples where the federal government had to step in to protect African-Americans from racist state governments. What I write below is because I hope it gives Americans a perspective of what it is like to not be an American, to live with your attention fixed on this powerful country whose every move can affect you- whose leaders can more profoundly affect our lives  than our own elected ones. We are all limited by our own settings- just as I won’t actually fully comprehend the serious problem of institutionalised racism in the US unlike Americans like you who actually live there even if I read about it. 

When I said I was glad Obama won instead of Romney, it’s because for us outside of the US who have no vote, the fact is that your country is the most powerful nation in the world who can just as easily destroy or help us. Perhaps, it is unfair to an extent that your leaders have to spend half their time embroiled in foreign conflicts instead of focusing wholly on US citizens- as you are right to demand-, but it is the way of the world where America is a superpower.

It is not just about “image“ to the outside world, but life and death for many non-Americans- like the Iraqi Yazidis and Christians who were surrounded and besieged by ISIS on a mountain- and facing genocide- who were begging for American airstrikes. There have been times when the US failed to intervene- like in Rwanda. The cruel part was people didn’t even need US soldiers on the ground, but just equipment and money- the US government pressured the UNSC to instead cut the already overstretched UN peacekeepers already there. At least 800,000 people were murdered. 

Or the Iranians worrying about whether the US would escalate from sanctions to war- just as Iraqis first feared it when Bush announced he was invading. Obama has actually handled Iran pretty well by de-escalating the situation and shutting down those who wanted war. To Iran’s neighbours, who know a destabilised Iran would have severe consequences for them. That is good for Americans too- soldiers will not be sent into a conflict that could have been defused diplomatically. Next to Romney, it was plain to us Obama was the president who had greater knowledge and understanding of the nuances of global conflicts. Romney came off to many of us as the epitome of white American privilege- and someone utterly blind to it - embracing the old forms of arrogant US exceptionalism that has harmed many of us, where everything is about brute force and appearing “tough”. 

And…well speaking as a non-American, many many things Obama has done hasn’t exactly made us happy either. Here’s a few: Many Pakistanis are angry at the increase in drone strikes. Palestinians are completely against the way the US has propped up Israel. Many Asian countries wish he would really beef up US military presence to deter China for example. Syrians felt they were left to die when there should have been military intervention against Assad- which would not have allowed ISIS to grow into the threat it is today (ISIS seems to have originated in the Syrian civil war). He certainly has not pandered excessively to non-Americans at all, but to many of us (though not all), as imperfect as he is, he is a vast improvement over Bush because he clearly better understands the world and doesn’t use the very jingoistic kind of American exceptionalism I see in a lot of Republican politicians who go around saying things like “I won’t ever apologise for America!” when the US government committed hideous injustices on people who deserve not just apologies but compensation. 

No American president is perfect, and even those who are generally beloved today like Franklin D. Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln made plenty of mistakes and had their own detractors. FDR interned Japanese-Americans unfairly, even when there was no evidence of widespread disloyalty. He also failed to bomb the concentration camps. Lincoln was called a dictator even by some pro-Union politicians because he greatly expanded his wartime powers to deal with the seccessionists and their suspected sympathisers in the Union and slammed by abolitionists themselves who felt he was too hesitant and too slow in making the step to officially abolish slavery. 

This is why many non-Americans pay so much attention to who your president is- because we have a huge stake in it. You are right to criticise or be dissatisfied with Obama where he has had his shortcomings, because all US presidents too have to multi-task. You elect your government to serve you- you are only asking for what is owed. But this is how things are like through our eyes, and as imperfect as Obama is, he has so far shown a better understanding of using the US military wisely and not to show off, than Bush- all the while facing the extremely unreasonable obstructionism in Congress I have seen as somebody who’s studied US history. By all means, hold his feet to the fire. But I do hope you understand why non-Americans pay such attention to and feel we have a right to comment on US politics- because it affects us.