aph:Canada

The border fence between Texas and Mexico has been blocking thousands of shifty foreigners from taking American jobs since Bush put it there in 2008. Regardless of what you think of the policy, no doubt the people who live in sight of the fence are happy that it’s keeping Mexico’s violent drug war from spilling over into their backyard. Or at least they would be, if they weren’t on the wrong freaking side of it. See, the problem is that, at some points, the fence is built over a mile inland from the actual border – in some parts actually cutting through residential property.

Due to a treaty that prevents building in certain areas near the border, the USA figured they had a bit of buffer room around where they actually built the fence, so some Americans got to watch in horror as their country built a huge “KEEP OUT” wall that left them on the outside, like the dick in every horror movie who locks the door while one guy is still outside getting swarmed by zombies. So, every day, Americans living in America have to cross the American border fence to enter America.

And even that doesn’t really convey the insanity of it; one farmer complains that he has to cross the border every time he travels between his field and his barn. At one point, it even cuts through the middle of a college campus in Texas. So students have to allow time to clear border security while running from one lecture to another.

The 5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders

cbc.ca
Renowned Canadian scientist Ursula Franklin dead at 94
'All her career, she was always the first and the pioneer and the woman,' her daughter says

Ursula Franklin, one of Canada’s most accomplished scientists and educators, died Friday in Toronto at the age of 94.

Franklin was born in Germany and moved to Canada in 1949 to improve her education after surviving the Holocaust.

The researcher joined the University of Toronto’s department of metallurgy and materials science in 1967, and became the institution’s first ever female university professor (a special designation accorded to a small portion of the faculty) in 1984.

“All her career, she was always the first and the pioneer and the woman,” said her daughter, Monica Franklin.

Franklin accrued a long list of awards and accomplishments throughout her long career. She was appointed to the Order of Ontario in 1990, and named a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1992.

In what was arguably her biggest contribution to science, Franklin discovered radioactive substances in Canadian children’s baby teeth.

“It was a little disconcerting because it was my teeth,” her son, Martin Franklin, recounted. “I was seven or so at the time and while other children had the tooth fairy, mine were being tested for strontium-90.”

Franklin’s research helped sway world opinion against nuclear weapons testing during the Cold War.

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cbc.ca
Saskatchewan oil spill breaches containment boom, putting Prince Albert on alert
City says it could store enough clean water to last until end of week

The city of Prince Albert, Sask., activated its emergency operations centre on Saturday afternoon to put together a contingency plan after noting that a boom set up to contain an oil spill upstream on the North Saskatchewan River had been breached.

A pipeline break, reported by Husky Energy on Thursday, resulted in an estimated 200,000 to 250,000 litres of oil reaching the North Saskatchewan, entering the water near Maidstone, Sask.

Booms had been initially setup in that area to try to contain the spill.

Prince Albert, among other communities which use the river as their source of water, has put together plans to close its intake valves. According to the city, a boom had been breached and the oil spill continues to travel downriver.

In an email Saturday night, Mel Duvall, a spokesman for Husky Energy, said the company’s containment and cleanup efforts in the wake of the spill are ongoing.

He did not specifically address the issue of whether a boom had breached, but did note that a boom deployed near the Paynton River ferry crossing was experiencing some difficulty.

“While containment has been challenged by high water levels and resulting floating debris, recovery operations continue,” Duvall said, adding that “additional actions” were being implemented.

A provincial official said in a media briefing Saturday that some oil had moved past that boom.

“Not all of the oil was contained at the surface,” said Wes Kotyk, executive director for the environmental protection branch of Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Environment.

Officials noted more booms were also being placed in the river at other strategic locations.

Prince Albert officials said the oil plume could reach the city as early as Sunday.

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vimeo

Canada’s Mount Seymour overlooks the city of Vancouver. The font at the opening is a bit silly but the footage from this perspective is really good, nice time lapse shots. Excellent aurora shots with really neat effects in the last minute.

The original caption:

The day I first set foot on Mount Seymour, I knew it would have a lasting profound impact on me. Located on Vancouver’s North Shore, the mountain looks down over the vibrant and pulsing city to the South, while the Coast Mountains stretch endlessly to the North. For 3 years, I returned on and off to seek inspiration, and to shoot as much timelapse as possible. Every time, I found a new and unique display of magic. I never tire of seeing the lights, the colours, the sunrise, the sunset, and just sitting back at peace above the world. This is the culmination of years of practice, countless pounds of equipment carried, many sleepless nights, and 100s of hours of editing. Enjoy!

instagram

The fog drifts over the lake like a spell. My thoughts follow it, breaking and reforming, interrupted only by the call of some hopeful, lonely frogs.
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. #writing #camping #fog #foggy #video #nature #naturelovers #naturelover #lake #forest #frogs #hiking #destination #inspire #inspired #traveling #travelingram #videogram #author #canada @canadasworld @explorecanada @hikingculture (at Grundy Lake Provincial Park)

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