ap sats

The ultimate masterpost

**This is a list of helpful sites pulled from multiple masterposts. I will be updating this as I find new things.** 

IMPORTANT!!!!!!!!! I KNOW THE LINKS AREN’T SHOWING UP IF ANYONE ON HERE KNOWS WHY THAT IS PLEASE TELL ME ASAP! IF YOU GO AND EDIT THE POST SO FAR IT SHOWS THE LINKS BUT I HAVE NO IDEA WHY THEY WILL NOT SHOW UP ON THE ACTUAL POSTS

**If something doesn’t work let me know.** Thank you!

**If something belongs to you and you want credit let me know. I tried to make all the links go to a specific site. But I’m happy to give you credit if you see something that connect back to you.**

SAT/ACT

ACT Masterpost
FREE MATERIAL
Vocab

AP’s Non-Specific 

For every high school student studying an AP test 
FREE MATERIAL (some SAT/ACt stuff too)
Study guides

AP’s Specific

Art History
Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history
Course-notes
Barrons pdfs

Biology
AP Biology Exam Guide
Chapter Review
Giant Review Sheet
Crash Course 

Calculus AB & BC
Cheatsheet (AB & BC)
Stuff You MUST Know Cold for AP Calc (AB)
If you see that, do this (AB)

Chemistry
AP Chemistry Notes
Podcasts
Quick Review
Periodic Table

Comparative Government and Politics
Government Comparisons
Cramsheet
Study Sheet (opens as word doc)

Computer Science
Review: Part 1

English Language
Rhetorical Strategies
AP Language Review

Environmental Science
Vocab to Know
Tips
APES Review

European History
STUDY GUIDES
Exam Review Sheets
Tom Richey 

French Language
Cram packet

Human Geography
Course-notes

Macroeconomics
Every Graph You Need To Know (YouTube)
Cram packet

Microeconomics
Study guide

Psychology 
sparknotes study guide
hella good review sheets
ton of flashcards woah
mind map of social psych
rough outline of the year
psychologists to know
crash course ~ hank green
intro to psych post
free textbook resources
study playlists help u
bunch of review materials
very good cram packet
lots of notes from a post
outline of erikson’s theory
mind map of disorders
how to stay motivated!!

Physics B & C
Equations (C Mech)
Unit Notes ©
Unit Notes ©
Equations © 

Statistics
Cram packet
Inference Procedures
AP Stats formulas

U.S. Government
Cheat Sheet
Review Materials
Tom Richey 

U.S. History
Cram Packet: part 1, part 2
The Giant AHAP Review
Unit study guides
Quizlet sets
The Comprehensive AP US History Study Guide
The man that saved me Part 1 Part 2

World History
Cram Packets and Review Sheets
Cram packets by era
Course-notes

General Subject’s

English Help
Cliffsnotes
Sparknotes
No Fear Shakespeare
How to Write a Essay (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
What makes a good Essay
How to Edit Yourself
Editing Checklist
Trouble Reading? Tips (X) (X) (X)
Writing Masterpost (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
Other things to help your Writing  (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)

Languages 
Duolingo
Achieving Proficiency

Math Help
Mathway (type in your problem and it solves it)
Square Root Calculator
Cube Root Calculator
Expression Simplifier
Helps you with Math
Easy unit converter
Any calculator you need
Algebra Solver
Scientific Calculator 
Cheat Sheet 

Science Help
All about space
Guides for more than 5,500 animal species
Improve you Geography knowledge
vast collection of historic images and videos
Symbols and their meanings
Comprehensive site for genetics and evolution
Lectures 
Lab Write Ups

Writing Help
Free Microsoft Word Equivalent
Writing Software Master post
Cant Remember A Word?
Bibliography Maker
Social Media Citation Guide
Earn A Cute Picture Of A Kitten For Writing
Writers Block?
Check Your Writing for Spelling and Grammatical Errors
Coffee Shop Sounds
Essay Structure Guide
Want To Know Who You Write Like?
Remember the Word
Alternatives to Said
Great Inspiration
Getting Inspired
Free Microsoft Word alternative
Dealing with writer’s block
Lay vs. lie
When to change paragraphs
Music for writing
Research and reading
How to write a kickass essay with ½ of the stress
How to write an essay
Guide to writing a basic essay
Essay writing: the basics
What makes a good essay?
How to google? (1) (2)
Writing tips
Harvard Writing Resources
Synonyms Masterpost
can’t find the right word?
Hemingway an online editor (It’s awesome)

Other Useful Stuff 

Citing
Bibme
Son of Citation Machine
Owl Purdue
How to write Bibliography

College tips
make a to do+doing+done board (I just did this and it is very helpful)
print sources nicely (1) (2)
recipes based on ingredients - recipepuppy
popular new headlines - newsmap.jp
ted.com
speed read - spreeder.com
white noise - simplynoise.com
plan sleep time - sleepyti.me
google like a boss - png / jpg
planetebook.com/ebooks 
readanybook.com
prezi.com 
collegepackinglist.com
Tips for college freshman
Know before college 
Preparing for a lecture

Productivity 
30/30 (app)
Essential productivity apps for any student*
Top 5 productivity apps for iOS (video)*
Top 5 productivity apps for Android (video)*
StayFocusd
Time Warp
Self Control (mac) blocks websites
The science of productivity (video)
The science of procrastination and how to manage it (video)
7 brain hacks to improve your productivity (video)
The simple science of getting more done (in less time)
Productivity tips
About power naps
How to pull an all-nighter effectively

Studying (Currently long but I will sort through at a later point)
Answering multiple choice questions
Apps for students
Basics for Efficient Studying
BBC Bitesize
Calculators
Check spelling and grammar
Coffitivity- sounds of a cafe
Convert Anything To Anything
Cornell note taking method
Coursera- Online courses for free.
Create flowcharts, network diagrams, ect.
Creating Effective Exam Cheat Sheets
Defeating Procrastination
Essay writing
Exam survival tips
Finals Help Guide
Finals survival guide
Flashcards
Free Flashcards Study Helper
Free online courses
Google books for research
Grammar Check
Guide on punctuation
Homework Help
How to answer exam questions
How to Read a Textbook
How to Review in Less Time
How to study
How to survive finals
How to take notes Masterpost
How to Underline/Highlight Effectively
How to write an essay
Inkflow Visual Notebook
Khan Academy- Learn anything.
Learning how to study
Making a good study guide
Memorizing dates
Momentum- Be motivated and organised.
Note taking like a pro
Notetaking Strategies
Online calculator
Online Ruler
open2study- Free online study for everyone.
Presentation Zen- A blog that helps you with your presentations.
Productive Study Break Tips
Pull an All Nighter & Do Well On Your Exam
Quizlet- Make flashcards and test yourself.
Reading Review, Highlighting, and Underlining
Research & Reading Tips
Scholarpedia
School survival guide
Science simplified
Simple and Not So Simple Proven Ways to Sharpen Memory
Solving Problems vs. Practicing Them 
Studyblue 
StudyBlue- Make online flashcards.
Studying for an important exam
Study Playlist 
Superb Study Guides and Mini Moleskines
Taking Notes Effectively and Practically
Test-taking Strategies
Test your vocabulary
The Benefits of Active Notetaking
The “Secret” to Doing Well in School
Thinking & Memorizing Tips
Time management
Tips and trick to help you get good grades
Triaging Your Assignments
Useful websites
Website Blocker- Remove temptation.
What NOT To Do When Studying
Wikiversity
Wolfram Alpha for research 
Youtube Crash Course
“Academic Disaster Insurance”
“Big Idea” Flashcards

Textbooks
Free textbooks
Text Book Nova
Textbooks
Textbooks  
Ebookee
Reddit
BookFinder
Medical Textbooks
Cookbooks to Text Books
Science/Math Textbooks
Business Textbooks
Tech Books
Greek and Roman Text in English
Art Books
Historical Fiction
History Books
Project Gutenberg
Bookbyte
Free Ebooks
Books
Books
Books
Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic books and Reference and study guides
Classic books
Free Textbook Download Masterpost
Textbook Guide

Organization
My Study Life - It’s a planner to help you remember when your homework is due and stuff like that
Free printable planner
To do list
How to make a study schedule
Class folder organization
“Study Cove” Organization
Making a Detailed Study Schedule
The Work-Progress Journal
Quick Tip for Flashcard Organization
Scheduling Organization
College Plan Spreadsheet Template
Organizing Your Notes
Getting Yourself Together in College with Mental Illness
How to Organize Your Workspace

Stress Reliefs/Relaxng
stress analyst - relaxonline
calm.com
distract yourself
self-care tips
self-care for overstimulated nerves
softest legs
feel better
Thoughts Room
Panic & Anxiety Masterpost
Guided Relaxation
Stress Relievers
Chill Playlist
Cute Videos
The quiet place project
Feelings Masterpost

Useful Stuff
plan, budget, and manage daily finances
How to take a Standardized Test
How to Master Excel
Fact check politicians
Back to school Masterpost
What you didn’t learn in high school

IDK what to put these under but they're helpful too
Check The Safety Of Any Website
Download From 8tracks
Print Webpages Without the Clutter
Is This Website Down For Me Or Everyone?
Self Defense Tips
Chrome Extension Tells You Which Tab Is Playing Music
Prevent Hangovers
Bookmark Online Videos
1 Month Free of Amazon Prime
Netflix Recommendations
Becoming An Adult Masterpost
All The Audios You’ve Ever Reblogged
Stream/Watch Free TV/Movies
Never Hit A Dead End With A Broken Link
Downloadable PDF To-Do Lists
Watch Musicals
List Of Universities On Tumblr
Summer Studying
Back to School

Scholarship Masterpost

8/17/2015: Updated some parts. Alphabetized the study section and added in new links. If at any point you want something added in that isn’t here just send me an ask or submit it in the submit box.

6/1/2016: Currently working on the issue of the links disappearing. Hopefully I’ll have it fixed 

Subject- and Class-Specific Study Tips

SCIENCES

Biology

Anatomy & Physiology

General Biology (AP)

Chemistry

Biochemistry

Organic Chemistry

Physical Chemistry

Mathematics

Calculus

Physics

General Physics

Quantum Mechanics

Electromagnetism

Engineering

Electrical

Mechanical

Computer Science

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Psychology

HUMANITIES

History

European History (AP)

Literature

STANDARDIZED TESTS

High School

AP

College Admission

ACT

Follow studyblrsubjects for more! Have your own tips or found some here on tumblr? Submit them here! Want to write some? Find a list of highly demanded subjects and classes here! If you want to suggest some classes and subjects or help run the blog, send us a message!

Happy studying!

To All the Students in School

I think this really needs to be said to all the high schoolers freaking out about AP exams, SAT scores, and ACT scores. Hell, even to those who are applying/applied to colleges or other things. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine your worth. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine how smart you are. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine your future. Only you, as a person, can determine that. I know it’s hard, I’m still in high school too. But I think you guys need to, have to, know that even if you get all A’s and a 1450+ (or 2200+) on the SAT that it doesn’t automatically guarantee you a job. You could end up going to Stanford, MIT, or Harvard but end up in a bad place. The school you end up going to doesn’t necessarily grant you a job either. Okay, yes, it makes it a little bit easier but either way, you’re going to have to work hard for everything to get where you want. All of you are so much more important than some score or letter grade. Y’all are gonna do great, as long as you have the passion and drive to work for it. Having straight A’s and perfect scores does not mean you will survive in the real world. Now, this isn’t a way to make you feel better or myself (since I’m not a straight A student either) about all of this because honestly it’s all so true.

Good luck on your AP exams and everything else though. :) You guys got this.

ATTENTION HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS

So we all know the college board is an actual piece of shit right? They overcharge for exams, to send CSS profiles to colleges, to send exam scores to colleges (and of course the colleges already have our scores because that’s why you keep getting mail saying omg your sat is so high pls apply), and they don’t even fucking give us a breakdown of our scores after we spend a couple hours taking their awful tests that are often designed so we fail them.
Anyways, it’s time to do something about it. AFTER we all get our AP scores this year, let’s ALL give the college board a piece of our minds. They won’t be able to do anything to us anymore - we’re done with their crap. We might not change anything, but at least we can annoy the fuck out of them.
So please reblog this and spread the word. Seniors, we’re gonna show the college board what we’re made of 👊🖕

Introduction: Hi! I’m Annie, I recently graduated as valedictorian of a class of almost 700, and I’m about to be a freshman at Johns Hopkins (go blue jays!!). High school was some of the best and worst moments of my life, and looking back, there are so many things that I wish I’d done and things that made me successful, so I wanted to share them! Of course, disclaimer, these tips may not apply to everyone!

(These tips generally apply to all classes, but if you have a specific subject you want tips on, I’ve taken these AP courses: european history, world history, us gov’t, macroeconomics, lang, lit, calc ab, chemistry, physics 1, physics c, environmental science, art: drawing, biology, human geography, chinese, and art history. Feel free to message me!)

College applications are a crapshoot- I can’t begin to tell you the number of incredible, brilliant people with extraordinary, international level achievements that got denied at top schools in favor of those lacking those accomplishments. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mean those who got in don’t have qualities that earned them a spot, it just speaks to the unpredictable nature of the college application process. When deans of admission at top schools openly say they could reject all admitted students and build the same exemplary class from the waitlist, or that they have enough qualified applicants to fill 3 or 4 classes with, there’s a certain amount of luck involved. Therefore I urge all rising seniors to go into this process realizing that the odds are not in your favor. I went into the process with too much blind hope, too confident in my ability to be that lucky 1 in 10 (or less) that would gain admission, and I was sorely disappointed. So that leads me to my next tip…

Don’t do things just for your college application- Those slim acceptance rates are the exact reason I urge you not to join things solely for how good they look on a college application. It seems counterintuitive; wouldn’t they give you a better chance of acceptance? However, my point is not to dissuade you from extracurriculars, but rather to commit to ones that genuinely make you happy. As I wrote above, the process is so competitive that even international achievements may mean rejection, so don’t waste your high school experience by dedicating so much time and effort to something that you feel obligated to do.

Try everything your freshman and sophomore year- My biggest regret is not joining clubs where my passions lie simply because I was too lazy or scared of things like public speaking my freshman year. It’s much more intimidating to join as upperclassmen, and you may not be able to participate at all the levels/in all the ways people who have dedicated 3-4 years can. Even if you don’t think its for you (like debate for me because of my fear of public speaking), I urge you to expand your horizons and push yourself out of your comfort zone. Many clubs give you great opportunities to build leadership, public speaking, etc. skills and to find your passions.

Know both sides of the flashcard- I learned this tip from my organic chemistry class, and I’d never though about how useful it is. For example, if you’re memorizing polyatomic ions, it’s extremely important that you know both the formula and the name, as either version may show up on the exam. Not doing this also makes the weaknesses in your memorization evident- whenever I study vocab, I tend to glance at the side with the term and only memorize the definition. This meant that when I was given only the definitions, I couldn’t remember the word they defined, because I was so used to being given the vocab word and responding with the definition. 

The first lecture of the unit is one of the most important for STEM classes- I know the beginning of the unit can often seem like the perfect time to tune out, as it goes over information you’ve previously learned or the easiest material of the topic, but it often forms the foundation for everything else in the unit. For example, the first lecture on a stoichiometry unit will probably teach you dimensional analysis, a skill integral to calculating molecular or empirical formulas, moles or grams of a substance, etc. 

Buy/sell books secondhand- Everyone knows how expensive college textbooks are, but between SAT and AP prep books, and books for English, high school books can cost quite a bit of money too. Unless they redesigned the exam recently, you absolutely don’t need the newest edition of the review book, so buy from upperclassmen and then sell it to underclassmen the following year.

Learn to self study- Unless you’re really lucky, you’re guaranteed to have a teacher who doesn’t teach, teaches badly, or whose teaching style just doesn’t work for you. Personally, I find that self learning, especially if I’m struggling because resources such as textbooks and online explanations, and videos seem to contradict, really helps me understand the topic throughly. In AP bio, my teacher had us create claymation videos on the processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis independently. It was incredibly frustrating and confusing because all the resources described the cycles in varying degrees of details, but I felt like I genuinely understood the topic, instead of having been spoon-fed the information and memorizing it. Obviously, this method isn’t very efficient for frequent use, but the key is to try to understand the material independently instead of going to the teacher the moment you hit a snag. 

Keep your backpack/binders/notebooks reasonably organized- When teachers ask for homework to be passed up and you have to dig through mountains of papers in your backpack, not only is that super stressful, but a lot of teachers won’t let you turn it in after they have already collected all the papers. I was definitely guilty of being lazy and just stuffing papers, once I got them, into my backpack instead of taking a few seconds to slide them into a binder, and as a result I got 0s on lots of homework because either I couldn’t find it at the time or because everything was so messy I didn’t remember there was homework. Try to have some sort of organization system going on or at least a homework folder, because those 0s add up and can be the difference between an 89 and 90. 

You’re gonna get senioritis, badly, and that’s ok- I’ve always been the type of person who did every homework assignment and was very focused on grades, so the idea that I would completely let myself ago seemed absurd to me. Don’t underestimate what senior year does to you. I can honestly count on one hand the econ worksheets that I actually turned in during senior year, and I made my first B in a grading period during the spring. I was very stressed about how awful my grades were, but unable to muster the energy to do anything about it. And you know what, it’s ok. It’s senior year, you can give yourself a break. Yes, your senior grades are still important for college applications, so don’t go from straight A’s to straight C’s, but for the most part, all the hard work is behind you. Do keep in mind that these habits may haunt you when you’re a college freshman. I haven’t started classes yet, but based on how little I studied for the math placement exam for my college, senioitis doesn’t magically end when you graduate, so don’t let it get completely out of control during the year. 

Learn how to do math without a calculator- If you take either of the AP Calculuses or the SAT, you need to master this skill because there are sections of the exams that are strictly non-calculator.  Beyond that, when you get to calculus, you’ll be introduced to complicated concepts, where not being able to multiply by hand will drag you down. 

Keep old notes- Not only for finals, but some topics are very interdisciplinary, like biochemistry, so it’s very important that you have a working knowledge of both biology and chemistry. As you take advanced classes, such as for me, taking physics c after physics 1, it will be assumed that you have completely mastered the basics, and they will be skipped or referenced very quickly. It is very useful to look at notes on the basics, which provide the foundation for the advanced material you learn. 

Invest in a whiteboard- Whenever I was learning about processes or cycles, from the Krebs cycle to organic chemistry mechanisms, it was really useful to practice drawing the steps over and over again. Then when it came to the test, I could do a brain dump and draw out the information as a reference. 

Understand formulas instead of blindly memorizing- This basically has physics and calculus written all over it. In physics, you should be given formula charts during exams, and in any case, something like F=ma isn’t terribly hard to memorize. The problem comes when there are a multitude of formulas that are derived from one of the fundamental equations. Of course, deriving from scratch each time is incredibly tedious, but I want to dissuade you from simply memorizing it or storing it on your calculator, because that means you probably don’t understand the physics behind it. What makes physics so difficult and different from any other subject you’ve taken is that every problem will have a slightly different scenario that tests your understanding of the physics behind it. 

Use all the time given to you during tests- I know I hate looking back through my test because I just get so bored halfway through, but missing points because of silly mistakes is honestly the most frustrating thing ever when you had plenty of time to check. Depending on if I have time, I like to cover my original work and resolve the question. If checking answers is not your thing, try slowing now when you first see each question, and checking your work briefly each step. 

Form study groups- Talking about something, especially teaching it to someone, always helped me remember something so much better than reading it on paper. It’s also so important to have second interpretations of the information you’re studying to ensure that you don’t make a huge misconception.  

AP students: released/practice exams are your best friend- Obviously, they’re the best resources for studying for the AP exam, but they’re also a great tool for a hint at what your teacher’s tests may look like. AP teachers have access to tons of College Board material and will often use questions directly from old exams. 

If you start getting confused during a lecture- Many times this is because I didn’t pay attention during the very beginning, so I’m missing that important foundation I talked about in the previous tip. Of course, I typically wouldn’t recommend doing things other than listening to what is currently being taught, but in this case, I would just get more confused and it’s a waste of time. So I discretely go back to my previous notes and focus on understanding them. 

The most stressful part of schoolwork is just thinking about your assignments- There’s always specific period of time that threatens to kill me- a week where I had two competitions simultaneously, in cities 3 hours apart. When you’re taking 7 AP classes at the same time, just reading over your to-do list will make you want to cry. Even on a normal day, as I go to classes throughout the day and my list of homework gets longer and longer, it makes me so stressed to where I’m planning out how to finish everything and I’m no longer listening in class. It overwhelmed me so much that I just wanted to take a nap and avoid school. But every single time, stressing about the work I have is 1000x worse than sitting down and actually going through each task. I find that what had seemed impossible before was very doable, and many times I even finished early enough to relax before bed. Keep a positive mindset, don’t underestimate your abilities, and have the discipline to start working immediately on the hardest days, and you’ll be fine. Of course, this doesn’t mean that the workload that is able to be handled by one person can work for another, and things like mental illnesses are things I have no experience in, so this is definitely just something that worked for me and is not applicable to everyone. 


Best of luck with high school! If you have any questions, feel free to send me an ask!

My AP World masterpost

Asks I’ve answered about school

Two more chapters of AP Environmental, chapters 1-4 of The Great Gatsby, and WWI review tonight. Chapter 29 of APWH, AP Psych reading, and AP Lang essay tomorrow (along w/ chapters 5-9 of the Great Gatsby). This is what happens when you procrastinate, folks 😪✨

guide: preparing for SAT chem

Hey all, I just took the SAT chem subject test for the second time today and I feel good about this one. Well, I still was short on time but I still felt like this attempt was better than my previous one in May because I feel like I practiced more and I was more prepared. So I decided to share my tips on how to prepare for the SAT chem subject test.

I once answered an anon’s ask about how I was preparing for the SAT chem test, so I guess this is an extension to my previous answer lol.

(Most of these tips can probably be used to prepare for any SAT subject test, just replace “chem” with the subject you’re taking. But don’t take my word for it; every subject test is slightly different in how you should prepare. I’ll probably make one specifically about preparing for math ½ since I also took the SAT math 2 test a year ago.)

1. Taking AP chem will make you more prepared than taking a introductory class.

I don’t know how it works in all other schools, but my school offered an introductory, “first-year” chemistry class that most people take during their underclassmen years. I took it during the summer, so you can imagine that if the class was only “introductory” and really fast-paced, I wouldn’t have been prepared much for the SAT chem test. An introductory class only goes surface-level and doesn’t really go deep into the concepts that you need to know for AP chem.

AP chem, on the other hand, does go really in-depth with all its subjects and will make you more than prepared for the SAT chem. If you do well in AP chem (B or higher), then you’ll do minimal reviewing of concepts for the SAT and be more focused on getting used to the format and timing of the test.

Of course, there are still some things that the SAT chem test covers that isn’t covered by the AP, including basic organic chemistry and environmental chemistry. There’s also stuff that’s on the AP that isn’t on the SAT. How do you know which topics to study? That brings me to my next tip…

2a. Use at least one prep book.

Use a prep book that’s from a company with excellent reputation for being the most ACCURATE. A more accurate prep book can tell you exactly what concepts you need to know and what you don’t need to know, which is especially helpful if you took AP chem so you don’t overstudy and don’t miss out on the concepts that weren’t covered by the AP chem curriculum.

The prep books I used to prepare were “Cracking the SAT Chemistry Subject Test (15th Edition)” by The Princeton Review, “SAT Subject Test: Chemistry (13th Edition)” by Barron’s, and “The Official SAT Subject Test in Chemistry Study Guide” by College Board. I used Barron’s and College Board’s books mostly to take practice tests, and The Princeton Review to review the concepts that were going to be on the test. If anyone wants more information or more of my opinions on these three books, send me a message!

2b. Don’t buy prep books.

Let’s face it, the SAT chem test is involved in only a fraction of your life and you don’t need to spend $50 on prep books. Save money. Borrow a prep book from the library if your library offers them. Go to the bookstore, get the prep books, and sit down somewhere and just get to work. I went to a in-store cafe in my bookstore, bought a drink, and worked with a prep book. Totally fine. Just be careful to not deteriorate the condition of the book too much.

I guess you could try to find illegal copies of it online, but try getting the book legally first lol. And beware of the websites you’re visiting.

You can still buy prep books if you want, but this piece of advice is for the students whose family doesn’t have much money. I’m with you.

3. Practice as much as possible.

Practice not only for the content (you should know your stuff before practicing), but more for the format and timing of the test. Also, don’t just take a test, figure out your score, and move on. Actually take the time to go over the questions you got incorrect, omitted, and got correct but you just guessed. There were many times when I was getting certain types of questions incorrect multiple times for the same reason, and I’m glad I went over my mistakes because the exact type of question showed up on the actual SAT chem test.

Also this should be obvious but take a practice test in a setting as accurate to the real setting as possible. Alone, quiet, with an alarm set to one hour. The more accurate your practice environment, the more comfortable you’ll be when you’re taking the actual test.

4. Most of the time it’s better to skip it than to guess.

We all hate the guessing penalty that’s still placed on SAT subject tests. But you still need to know when to guess and when to not, and this decision-making part can be stressful and take up a chunk of your precious time on the test, so it’s best to practice making this decision when practicing.

My general rule is that if you can eliminate down to two choices, then you can guess. If you can only eliminate down to three choices or more, then don’t guess. Statistically speaking, majority is best, and since 50% is better and closest to majority than 33% or lower, you should only guess when you got a 50/50 shot. It’s better to be safe and earn and lose no points than to end up earning no points but losing a quarter of a point. And trust me, those quarter-point penalties add up to a lot.

5. Sleep. In the morning, follow your usual routine.

It’s important to sleep instead of staying up all night. But it’s still important to stick to your normal routine so your body isn’t suddenly thrown off its normal schedule that it’s used to. Sleep the amount of hours you usually get on average, but still aim for more than 6. In the morning, eat breakfast, but don’t eat a huge breakfast if you’re not used to it. If you always eat cereal, then just eat cereal, but add something small like a bowl of fruit. If you don’t eat breakfast, definitely just grab a granola bar before heading out.

Also, coffee. If you always drink coffee in the morning, then drink your normal cup of coffee. But don’t suddenly decide to drink stronger coffee or drink if you usually don’t because, like I said, you don’t want to throw your body off, and abnormal amounts of caffeine will definitely do that.

I tried to give as much advice as possible, but if anyone has any questions or concerns then feel free to send an ask or a message!

Analyzed two poems for AP Lit earlier. Today I finished a practice reading section from the new SAT and scored a 45 out of 52. I took it untimed and throughout the day because my schedule was crazy, so I may have done better than I would have if I had taken it in one go (although I was extremely tired so??) who even knows. All I know for sure is that I have a month to improve!

College Apps Gothic

The emails begin in sophomore year. The mailings follow shortly after. You do not know when the sense of creeping dread began. Maybe it has always been there.

The void of despair opens August 1st.

They track demonstrated interest. They track undemonstrated interest. They are always watching. When you open their email, the rustling in your walls gets louder, closer. They are here.

The brochure tells you that this college requires the SAT or ACT, two SAT subject tests, and the trial of darkness. Your GPA dictates the number of weapons you are allowed to bring with you. They only tell you the survival rate is better than Harvard’s.

You wake up one morning to a pile of college mail stacked neatly outside your door. You have not given your address to any college. How do they know where you sleep? How do they–

You may apply to this university under single choice early action, binding. The form smells like sulfur and your signature is red, too red. They do not tell you what you are bound to.

On your campus visit, you look around at the other visiting students. They stare back with lifeless eyes, deep shadows beneath their dead gazes. You see the same when you look into a mirror. You have not slept through the night for four years.

The tour guide’s smile is too wide, her teeth too sharp. You swear you hear her laugh grating an octave too low as she goes over the meal plans. She avoids the sun and when the light hits her eyes just right, you can see a glint of yellow.

Numbers haunt your dreams until you shiver awake, visions of SAT bubbles swimming before you. You do not know why you are required to fill them in with blood, or what machine they are sacrificed to.

No one you know has been accepted as an engineering major. No one, in fact, has ever been accepted as an engineering major. Still, thousands apply every year and are consumed by the void.

Reporting activities can help a college better understand your life outside of the classroom. Your activities may include arts, athletics, clubs, employment, personal commitments, arcane worship of the underworld,  fulfillment of pacts with elder gods, eternal screaming, and other pursuits. Do you have any activities that you wish to report?

You are no longer a name, only an AP number. The test proctor warns you that without these eight digits, you cannot access the rest of your existence.

The multiple choice answers are all option D.

The common app now has a supplemental option in which you may submit your soul. Applicants are reminded that they may select up to three colleges under this action, only one of which may be early decision.

Please describe your life to date, complete with documentation. You have 650 words.