anzaldua

mashable.com
10 feminist books to read after you've gotten through the classics
The feminist canon gets an intersectional update.
By SaVonne Anderson

“Literature has always been the foundation of the feminist movement. Since the 18th century, when Mary Wollstonecraft wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, women have used print to spread knowledge and awareness, and promote feminist ideas.

Although feminist literature has been around for hundreds of years, we tend to stick to an unofficial canon of a few classics. But to promote progress and intersectionality, we should expand our feminist library to include more contemporary works, too.

In addition to being relevant to the times, today’s feminist literature often features more diverse authors and perspectives, representing the many voices of the feminist movement at large.

These 10 books do just that. And while they may not be classics yet, they’re well worth a read if you’re interested in expanding your knowledge of feminism.”

See the list here

To live in the Borderlands means you
are neither hispana india negra Española
ni gabacha, eres mestiza, mulata,
half breed
caught in the crossfire between camps
while carrying all five races on your back
not knowing which side to turn to, run from;

To live in the Borderlands means knowing
that the india in you,
betrayed for 500 years,
is no longer speaking to you,
that mexicanas call you rajetas,
that denying the Anglo inside you
is as bad as having denied
the Indian or Black;

Cuando vives en la frontera
people walk through you, the wind
steals your voice,
you’re a burra, buey, scapegoat,
forerunner of a new race,
half and half—both woman and man,
neither—
a new gender;

To live in the Borderlands means to
put chile in the borscht,
eat whole wheat tortillas,
speak Tex-Mex with a Brooklyn accent;
be stopped by la migra at the border checkpoints;

Living in the Borderlands means you fight hard to
resist the gold elixir beckoning from the bottle,
the pull of the gun barrel,
the rope crushing the hollow of your throat;

In the Borderlands
you are the battleground
where the enemies are kin to each other;
you are at home, a stranger,
the border disputes have been settled
the volley of shots have shattered the truce
you are wounded, lost in action
dead, fighting back;

To live in the Borderlands means
the mill with the razor white teeth wants to shred off
your olive-red skin, crush out the kernel, your heart
pound you, pinch you roll you out
smelling like white bread but dead;

To survive the Borderlands
you must live sin fronteras
be a crossroads.

Gloria Anzaldúa, “To Live in the Borderlands Means You”

The process of falling apart (the Coyolxauhqui process), of being wounded, is a sort of shamanic initiatory dismemberment that gives suffering a spiritual and soulful value. The shaman’s initiatory ordeal includes some type of death or dismemberment during the ecstatic trance journey. Torn apart into basic elements and then reconstructed, the shaman acquires the power of healing and returns to help the community. To be healed we must be dismembered, pulled apart. The healing occurs in disintegration, in the demotion of the ego as the self’s only authority. By connecting with our wounding, the imaginal journey makes it worthwhile. Healing images bring back the pieces, heal las rajaduras. As Hillman notes, healing is a deep change of attitude that involves an adjustment and abandonment of “ego-heroics.” It requires that we shift our perspective. La
—  Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Light in the Dark/Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity, Spirituality, Reality
In the 1800s, Anglos migrated illegally into Texas, which was then part of Mexico, in greater and greater numbers and gradually drove the tejanos (native Texans of Mexican descent) from their lands, committing all manner of atrocities against them. The Battle of the Alamo, in which the Mexican forces vanquished the whites, became, for the whites, the symbol for the cowardly and villainous character of the Mexicans. It became (and still is) a symbol that legitimized the white imperialist takeover. With the capture of Santa Anna later in 1836, Texas became a republic. Tejanos lost their land and, overnight, became the foreigners.
—  Gloria Anzaldúa, “Borderlands / La Frontera”

Life Syllabus: Browntourage

These “lonely brown cuties” share the books/art/Instagram accounts that introduced them to eco-feminism, sci-fi, and Orientalism.

By @browntourage. Illustration of Luna the Queen, by Alyssa Etoile.