antwerp royal academy

School Disco – “There was absurd, over-the-top hype before it even began.”

by Lauren Cochrane

Although the Raf Simons label was originally launched in autumn/winter 1995, his growing number of fans were treated to five successive seasons of fairly low-key video presentations before the designer finally felt the time was right to put his vision on the runway. It was worth the wait thanks to a show remembered as much for the over-crowding as the clothes.

Indeed, the School Boy collection of autumn/winter 1997 – which Simons now sees as his full-blown fashion industry debut – was a genuine “moment“. Featuring a group of street-cast, non-professional models, and taking place in a defunct discotheque filled with rickety old chairs (for invited industry legends such as Suzy Menkes to perch on precariously), Simons proposed not only an innovative new way for men to dress, but a remarkably fresh type of fashion show, too.

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Bernhard Willhelm autumn—winter 1999—00.

In 1998 Bernhard Willhelm graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts with his collection Le Petit Chapeau Rouge. A fairy tale that was to be continued in 1999 when he launched his women’s collection Autumn/Winter 1999-2000 in Paris.

Inspired by a childhood in the forest-rich surroundings of Bavaria in Germany, Bernhard Willhelm offers us a totally new interpretation of folkloristic costumes, patchwork, knitwear and ‘Sunday’s Best’ clothes. He designs blouses that look like flowers and ‘restructured’ jackets emphasising the shoulders. Using the body for a survey into — sometimes aerodynamic — shapes and forms, Bernhard Willhelm stays loyal to the colours and beauty of organic structures and never falls into the rigidness of architectonic constructions. 

Bernhard Willhelm autumn—winter 1999—00.

In 1998 Bernhard Willhelm graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts with his collection Le Petit Chapeau Rouge. A fairy tale that was to be continued in 1999 when he launched his women’s collection Autumn/Winter 1999-2000 in Paris.

Inspired by a childhood in the forest-rich surroundings of Bavaria in Germany, Bernhard Willhelm offers us a totally new interpretation of folkloristic costumes, patchwork, knitwear and ‘Sunday’s Best’ clothes. He designs blouses that look like flowers and ‘restructured’ jackets emphasising the shoulders. Using the body for a survey into — sometimes aerodynamic — shapes and forms, Bernhard Willhelm stays loyal to the colours and beauty of organic structures and never falls into the rigidness of architectonic constructions.