antonio-pena

“Dicevi ‘Io non voglio far star male nessuno e non voglio stare male per nessuno…’ e a me non ci pensavi, alle tue assenze che erano delle vere e proprie scuse. Noi non eravamo in due, c'eri solo tu. Perché io ti ho amato con tutto il cuore, con i magoni, l'insonnia, le chiamate senza risposta e gli occhi gonfi. Se un giorno ti chiederanno di me, so per certo che non pensarai al mio volto, alle promesse, ai ritardi e ai tuoi sbalzi d'umore, ma al fatto che ne sarebbe valsa la pena.”

Io ti ho amato con tutto il cuore, con i magoni, l'insonnia, le chiamate senza risposta e gli occhi gonfi. Se un giorno ti chiederanno di me, so per certo che non penserai al mio volto, alle promesse, ai ritardi e ai tuoi sbalzi d'umore, ma al fatto che ne sarebbe valsa la pena.
—  Antonio Dikele Distefano
Dicevi ‘Io non voglio far star male nessuno e non voglio stare male per
nessuno…’ e a me non ci pensavi, alle tue assenze che erano delle vere e proprie scuse. Noi non eravamo in due, c’eri solo tu. Perché io ti ho amato con tutto il cuore, con i magoni, l’insonnia, le chiamate senza risposta e gli occhi gonfi. Se un giorno ti chiederanno di me, so per certo che non penserai al mio volto, alle promesse, ai ritardi e ai tuoi sbalzi d’umore, ma al fatto che ne sarebbe valsa la pena.
—  Antonio Dikele Distefano, Fuori piove dentro pure passo a prenderti?

CRISPR-like ‘immune’ system discovered in giant virus

Gigantic mimiviruses fend off invaders using defences similar to the CRISPR system deployed by bacteria and other microorganisms, French researchers report1. They say that the discovery of a working immune system in a mimivirus bolsters their claim that the giant virus represents a new branch in the tree of life.

Mimiviruses are so large that they are visible under a light microscope. Around half a micrometre across, and first found infecting amoebae living in a water tower, they boast genomes that are larger than those of some bacteria. They are distantly related to viruses that include smallpox, but unlike most viruses, they have genes to make amino acids, DNA letters and complex proteins.

That means that they blur the line between non-living viruses and living microbes, says Didier Raoult, a microbiologist at Aix-Marseille University in France, who co-led the study with microbiologist colleague Bernard La Scola. Raoult says that he doesn’t consider the mimivirus to be a typical virus; instead, it is more like a prokaryote — microbes, including bacteria, that lack nuclei.

Computer artwork of a particle of the giant mimivirus. Jose Antonio Penas/Science Photo Library