anti-animal-exploitation

LIONS CAGED AND WAITING TO BE HUNTED, canned style, in ARIZONA?!!!….lions are being bred there, so the rich can play “BIG TIME HUNTER”, in an enclosed area…please, sign and share below, to say STOP THESE KILLING GAMES…..for the victims, it is not a game…it is LIFE OR DEATH….thanks, Animal Freedom Fighters…

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/149/487/053/ban-canned-hunting-in-arizona/

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World Week for Animals is labs is coming up next month!
During the week of April 19th - 27th organizations all over the world are hosting events to bring awareness to the cruelties of animal testing. 

The Bunny Alliance is encouraging organizations and individuals to use this week to get involved in the Gateway to Hell Campaign by kicking off some actions in your city!

You can download leaflets and signs from out webpage here.
You can find a list of Delta Locations here.

Feel free to contact The Bunny Alliance with any questions on how you can get involved in the global Gateway to Hell Campaign!

The Bunny Alliance

Global: Gateway to HellFrance: Air Souffrance
Germany: Stop Vivisection

Animal Shame (Community)

You might think hunting a lion in Africa is a difficult task. As you can see, as far as physical fitness goes, you don’t need much of it. As long as you can pick up a gun and point it and shoot, then you’re pretty much set. 

You might wonder why the lion does not attack the big bad hunter, well this is mainly because the lion is tame, and as it was hand-reared by humans it has no fear of them. This disgusting practice known as “canned hunting” is made possible by the South African government who enjoy filling their pockets with the blood money of their wildlife.

South Africa is now full of hundreds of killing farms, where thrill-killing tourists from all over the world travel to brutally kill tame lions in high-fenced enclosures. The lions are tore away from their mothers at a few days old and put in petting zoo’s and volunteer projects. Once they grow too big for petting they are put in tiny enclosures to grow to suitable “trophies” over a couple of years. They are only released into a larger enclosure when they are to be shot.