anti war 1960s

4

The March on the Pentagon, 10/21/1967

Wolfe, Frank, White House photographerSeries: Johnson White House Photographs, 11/22/1963 - 1/20/1969Collection: White House Photo Office Collection, 11/22/1963 - 1/20/1969

On October 21, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

‘U.S. Get Out Of Vietnam Now!! Year of Solidarity with Vietnam / October 8-11’, Sponsored by the Black Panther Party, Young Lords Organization, and Students for a Democratic Society / Revolutionary Youth Movement, Chicago, 1969.

”Members of the military police keep back protesters during their sit-in at the Mall Entrance to the Pentagon.”  10/21/1967

Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

A female demonstrator offers a flower to military police on guard at the Pentagon during an anti-Vietnam demonstration.”  10/21/1967

S.Sgt. Albert R. Simpson, photographer. Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21-22, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War 

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

“Anti-Vietnam Demonstration. Protesters sit on the wall around their bonfire after spending the night at the Pentagon’s mall entrance.” 10/22/1967

Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21-22, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

“Anti-Vietnam Demonstration. U.S. Marshals bodily remove one of the protesters during the outbreak of violence at the Pentagon Building.” 10/22/1967

Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21-22, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the Vietnam War.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.