anti arab

I think Arab Supremacy is not talked about enough and it is something I feel strongly about. Racism in Arab countries against South Asians and East Asians, as well as black people is seen as common and expected. It is normal for staff to treat customers who aren’t white or Arab themselves poorly, and not to mention the horrific treatment of the domestic workers and construction workers, who are completely ignored and basically have very little rights once they start working for Arab families. Racism in Arab countries is swept under the rug and tolerated. Arabs adopt a mentality similar to white people and develop superiority complexes, this has a lot to do with their skin colour, as anti blackness is rampant in Arab culture as well. It is so common to see blatant racism from Arabs openly on twitter and there seems to be little to no backlash. Why are they excused from their racist views?  
There are documentaries made about racism in Arab countries, Lebanon being infamous for it’s racism as well as the Khaleeji states (U.A.E, Qatar, Bahrain) whose ugly truths are hidden behind their attempts to constantly show off their country as luxurious resorts. White people visiting these countries (especially Dubai) will LOVE the way they are treated, because they come only second to Arabs and retain their white privilege. However, people with more melanin (especially Asians) will find their situations are not the same. 

George Lopez and his Racism/Misogynior

The Black community has supported George Lopez’s comedy for years yet he exposed the real anti-Blackness that goes on in the Latino community. And to see him call that Black woman a bitch and tell her to sit her “fucking ass down” as if he was perpetrating a slave master role was hard to hear/witness. The whole audience encouraged him and his excuse was that it was a joke and if she couldn’t take a joke then she needs to “get the fuck out”. Latinos and Arabs often think they can’t be racist because they are discriminated against but this isn’t the case, you can still perpetrate anti-Blackness and George Lopez indeed did so on that public stage. 🗣TRASH

3

These Muslim travelers were denied Global Entry cards. Now they’re suing the DHS.

  • Muslim travelers are suing the Department of Homeland Security for refusing to release records related to their Global Entry applications.
  • The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against DHS on Tuesday to see if there’s an internal policy within the agency to revoke Global Entry status for Muslim and Arab travelers. 
  • Dozens of individuals — all who have Muslim names or are of Arab origin — have reported problems with their global entry status, Abed Ayoub, ADC’s legal director, said in a phone interview.
  • “Without the information [requested from the FOIA], it’s difficult to gauge what happened, how many people are affected and if there’s a policy in place [in DHS] for Arabs and Muslim-Americans,” Ayoub said. Read more (4/18/17)

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thimblerobot  asked:

Fellow Jew, still trying to work out their connection with Judaism, but why your link between anti Israel sentiments and anti semitism?

Because it exists. 

It’s not that I love Israel, or think Israel can do no wrong. In all honesty, I have massive problems with Israel on just about every front possible. I am anti-settlement, anti-rabbinate, and find Israel’s current government to be relatively loathsome. 

If somebody could outline a detailed, realistic plan for both Jews and Palestinians to have complete safety and full self-determination in a single, unified state, I wouldn’t be inherently opposed to it (I’ve yet to see one; the consensus from the anti-Israel crowd seems to be that doing away with Israel would be like throwing water on the Wicked Witch of the West, with everything just being magically wonderful and fine in the aftermath). 

I am not Israel’s cheerleader. I never have been. 

What I am is an activist for combatting anti-semitism, and unfortunately, there is a ton of anti-semitism surrounding the I/P conflict. In fact, it’s the reason I stopped actively engaging with various movements for Palestinian liberation. It’s not that I don’t still support the safety and self-determination of Palestinians; I do. But I could no longer be a part of groups that not only failed to call out anti-semitism, but also questioned my loyalties if I brought it up. And that’s not helpful for the futures of Israelis and Palestinians. In fact, it’s detrimental to them. 

I decided two years ago that it was impossible to move forward without ridding ourselves of anti-semitism, Islamophobia, and anti-Arab racism. I still stand by that. There is simply nowhere to go without conquering those prejudices first and foremost, and that’s why I started this blog.

Right now, there is a enormous prejudice on both sides, and that includes a vast amount of anti-semitic prejudice in the anti-Israel camp. Do I think there are ways to be opposed to Israel without being anti-semitic? Yes. But there are very few people who seem to be in that headspace, and nearly all of the ones I individuals I know who are, are either anti-state anarchists, Jews, or both. 

Here are examples of anti-semitism manifesting within anti-Israel discourse:

  • Denying Jewish history and ethnicity by claiming Jews are not indigenous to the region. Science has proven time and again that we are. Archaeology has proven time and again that we are. Saying we’re foreign invaders with no right to live on the land is revisionist and anti-semitic. 
  • Denying your country’s history of anti-semitism and the role that played in the creation or continued existence/desire for Israel. Just as you can’t be from Poland or Norway or Russia and then be mad that Jews went back to their homeland, you also can’t be from Morocco or Egypt or Iraq and act like you have no clue why Jews might not feel safe living in a non-Jewish country. If you can’t say “I understand that my people expelled or murdered you, and I understand why, given what my people did, you feel unsafe and want your own country, even if I disagree with the policies of Israel or the methods that went into its creation” then you are being anti-semitic. 
  • Having an opinion on the existence of Israel if you are from a country that murdered or expelled its Jews for being Middle Eastern interlopers. You cannot have a history where your ancestors for generations told Jews to go back to where they came from and then decide we shouldn’t have gone back where we came from. You can be critical of Israel, but you have no right to question Jews for doing exactly what your ancestors spent thousands of years telling us to do.
  • Not thinking Jews have a right to self-determination, and/or not caring about Jewish lives and Jewish safety. Enough said. 
  • Saying there’s no such thing as Israeli culture or that Jews “stole” Middle Eastern cuisine, customs, etc. Half of the Israeli populace is Mizrahi; when they were expelled from MENA countries, they took their traditions and customs with them to Israel. They then blended those traditions and customs with those of Jews from all over the world. Saying Jews stole these things is to deny the rights MENA Jews have to their own culture. Saying Israel has no culture is simply idiotic, because regardless of how you feel about the existence of the state, you simply cannot have people from all over the world joining to together in a new place without them blending their backgrounds and creating something unique and new. It’s anthropologically impossible for that not to happen. 
  • Singling Israel out for actions perpetrated by other nations or holding it to higher standards that other countries. As I have stated many times on this blog, as a Bengali Jew, I will fucking go at you if you are Pakistani and call for the destruction of Israel but not Pakistan. If you have double standards for Israel, rightly or wrongly the only Jewish country in the world, then you are being anti-semitic. You can’t turn a blind eye to shit other countries pull, but suddenly be outraged when Israel, and only Israel, does the same thing. That’s not social justice, that’s anti-semitism. For example, Lush Cosmetics says they won’t open a store in Israel due to their stance on human rights issues. Fine. Fair enough. But, oh, what’s that? Lush has stores in Russia, the UAE and Saudi Arabia? Suddenly, the situation changes. Given the collective human rights abuses of these countries, this tells me Lush Cosmetics doesn’t give two flying fucks about human rights; they only care about punishing Jews. 
  • Questioning Jewish “loyalties” or collectively blaming all Jews for Israel’s actions. I don’t live in Israel. I can’t vote in Israel. Holding diaspora Jews responsible for what Israel does or equating Judaism and the Israeli government is anti-semitic. Also demanding that Jews pass a litmus test or prove themselves to you as a “good Jew” is anti-semitic. 
  • Blaming Israel for unrelated tragedies and events. This is invoking “the Jews are secretly controlling the world” trope and it’s antisemitic as fuck. Israel is not the cause for racist American police officers being murderous scum. Israel is not the cause the cost of rising CUNY tuition. It’s one thing to criticise Israel, it’s quite another to blame Israel for everything the sun touches. At that point, people are just replacing the word “Jews” with “Zionists” to get away with blaming us without looking racist. 

When people say/do these things, I call them out, because they are perpetrating anti-semitism, and they are wrong. That doesn’t mean I think all criticism of Israel is anti-semitic; I don’t. But if you can’t call for a solution to the I/P conflict without being guilty of invoking these talking points, then you don’t care about actually fixing the problem; you just enjoy hating the Jews. 

Note: Goyim are free to reblog this, but I don’t want any non-Jews commenting on this post. Jews decide what constitutes anti-semitism; not you, and how we feel about both Israel and anti-semitic oppression is an intra-community discussion in which you are not invited to participate. Hands off.

10

So on Twitter right…I called out a Muslim woman from Yemen about saying the n-word. She uses the n-word more than I do, and I’m Black. Even after me and my Twitter friend explained to her and her fellow Yemeni brothers that saying the n-word as a non-Black is inherently racist, they proceeded to continue to use the n-word proudly. The last picture was her last tweet in which she said “Wallah that thread was so damn annoying and pointless. Lol nigga nigga nigga nigga nigggggaaaaa” I’m not even the type to expose people like this but she should be made an example, she showed no remorse whatsoever even though we explained why only Blacks are entitled to reclaim the n-word.

So my question to Arabs is, when will you address the heavy anti-Blackness that happens within your community to Blacks? When and how? You may not realize it, but it’s anti-black for you to go around saying the n-word and you’re not Black.

P.S. I’ll delete this when she take down all them damn tweets saying nigga.

5

“I’m so sick of the antiblackness that drowns Black muslims in this one Ummah violently forced on us by brown & white passing Muslims.

Yall need to acknowledge you are the white ppl in our community. You treat us no better than how actual white ppl treat us outside of Islam. Forever finding ways to derail our voices or worse, silence us.

“Its not that deep. Its just a HT.” — says privileged assholes occupying spaces that BLACK MUSLIMS WERE FORCED TO CREATE CAUSE YALL DGAF ABOUT REPRESENTING US!

The sheer nerve.”-Riya Jama

These are types the micro-aggressions we experience throughout a community that is saturated by anti-blackness, and a narrative surrounding an Arab, white passing, non black standard. I’m tired of their eerily similar response to anti blackness, their privilege, and the oppression that black Muslims experience in the community. 

The same lackluster response as white people: “ I have black Muslim friends,” “ You are the most racist people,” aka reverse racism, “ Your making to much of a big deal,” “ Guys it’s wrong not to include us. Remember where your brothers and sisters,” aka shaming via the religion to allow them to be oppressive, and my very favorite, “There is no racism in the community because Prophet Muhammed PBUH said not to be. He said we’re equal.” aka I can’t be racist bc we’re all Muslims. There is no race we are the Ummah(Muslim Community), and the most gross response, “ What about Bilal? He was such a good Muslim man, and was important to the prophet, and to Islam,” aka see we have this token black man who use to be our slave, but then we freed him and treat him equally. You should be happy you have him.   

 These response are so insulting, and reeks of anti-blackness and privilege that I can’t even digest it. This Palestine man, and all the brown, Arab, and white passing Arabs that are supporting his theft and racist privileged tweets are the epitome of the communities response to anti blackness. I’m not surprised he stole it. I’m not even surprised at their comments. What I’m actually surprised about is Black Muslims who are surprised or shocked by this. What did we expect? 

 I’m tired of people acting like their not oppressors, that Arab supremacy isn’t a thing, and more then anything I wish black Muslims would take a step back and realize that we’re fine on our own.  Contrary to what they try to feed you they are not tied to our religion in way that without them then our faith, and relationship with Allah(God) can’t exist. That they must be the center of our faith. Sounds very familiar to what white supremacy does doesn’t it? 

 #BlackOutEid was for us to celebrate our melanin and faith in a community that rarely acknowledges our existence unless it’s taking from us. It was a moment to show more representation of Black Muslims, and celebrate despite a racist community, and global anti blackness that blackness is beautiful. Regardless of the community that caters and creates spaces for them they tried to take this space we created for us. 

#BlackOutEid is not for you

#BlackMovements are not yours to use.

#BlackMuslimsExist stop the erasure.

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i edited this in imessage

Right Wing Terrorist Attacks in the United States
  1. 2017 Austins Bar and Grill Olathe, KS Shooting
  2. 2015 Colorado Planned Parenthood Shooting
  3. 2015 Lafayette Shooting
  4. 2015 Charleston Church Shooting
  5. 2015 Florida Police Ambush
  6. 2014 Las Vegas Police Ambush
  7. 2014 Kansas Jewish Center Shooting
  8. 2014 Blooming Grove Police Shooting
  9. 2014 Forsyth County Courthouse Shooting
  10. 2013 Los Angeles International Airport Shooting
  11. 2013 Alabama Bunker Hostage Crisis
  12. 2012 Tri-State Killing Spree
  13. 2012 St. John’s Parish Police Ambush
  14. 2012 Sikh Temple Shooting
  15. 2011 Pacific Northwest Killing Rampage
  16. 2011 FEAR Militia
  17. 2010 West Memphis Police Shootings
  18. 2010 Carlisle, PA Murder
  19. 2010 Austin, TX Plane Attack
  20. 2010 Florida Sovereign Citizen Police Ambush
  21. 2009 Minutemen American Defense Hispanic Slayings
  22. 2009 Okaloosa County, FL Police Gun Range Attacks
  23. 2009 Brockton, MA Black Targeted Shooting Rampage
  24. 2009 Pittsburgh Police Shootings
  25. 2009 Holocaust Museum Shooting
  26. 2009 George Tiller Assassination
  27. 2009 Flores Murders, Pima County, AZ
  28. 2009 Brockton, MA Murders
  29. 2008 Knoxville, TN Church Shooting
  30. 2004 Tulsa OK, Bank Robbery
  31. 2003 Abbeville, SC right-of-way standoff
  32. 2002 Massillon, OH anti-government shootout
  33. 2001 Anthrax Attacks
  34. 2001 Dallas Anti-Arab Revenge Shootings

Before 9/11 but after the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

  1. 2000 Pittsburgh, PA Racially Motivated Spree Killing
  2. 1999 Los Angeles Jewish Community Center Shooting
  3. 1999 Midwest Murder Spree
  4. 1999 Redding, CA Arson Attacks & Anti-Gay Murders
  5. 1998 Barnett Slepian Assassination
  6. 1998 Cortez, CO Watertruck Shootout
  7. 1998 Birmingham, Alabama Planned Parenthood Bombing
  8. 1997 Army of God Attacks
  9. 1997 Aryan People’s Republic Six State Terror Wave
  10. 1996 Spokane Phineas Priests Bombing Campaign
  11. 1996 Atlanta Centennial Olympic Park bombing
  12. 1996 Jackson, MS Larry Shoemake murder spree
  13. 1996 Aryan Republic Army FBI Shootout
  14. 1995 Palo Verde Amtrak Derailment
  15. 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing
  16. 1994 Boston, MA Planned Parenthood Shooting
  17. 1994 John Britton Assassination
  18. 1993 Pensacola, FL Women’s Medical Clinic Shooting

Crisis mode meant that certain issues were privileged over others. This point was most clearly evident in moments when people raised critiques of sexism or homophobia within our movement. These critiques were met with an official movement logic that contended that the issue of sexism was secondary to the fact that “our people are dying back home.” Alternatively, it positioned discussion of homophobia as entirely irrelevant or outside the boundaries of acceptability. In this movement - as in many racial justice and national liberation solidarity movements - the official movement logic also subordinated critiques of sexism and homophobia in reaction to racism.

Not only were gender and sexuality barely discussed, but the official movement discourse insisted that discussing these internal issues in public could actually endanger the goals activists were fighting for. Many members of this movement shared the belief that U.S. Orientalist representations of Arabs and Muslims, specifically images of hyperoppressed Arab and Muslim women and Arab Muslim sexual savagery, were among the most common images Americans saw - especially form the news media and Hollywood. In their analysis, Orientalist representations were a key reason so many Americans supported U.S. military interventions in the Middle Eat and why many Americans, particularly liberals, expressed profound empathy for Arab and Muslim women - perceived to be victims of their culture and religion - but little concern over the impact of U.S. policies on Arab and Muslim communities.

In response, many activists feared that discussing sexism and compulsory heterosexuality within Arab communities would reinforce Orientalism. Activists advocated an anti-Orientalist politics that reinforced the relegation of gender and sexuality to the margins. Activists feared that speaking out about sexism and homophobia could reinforce stereotypes of Arabs and strengthen the very violence they were fighting to eliminate. The tacit belief was that activists who publicly critiqued sexism or homophobia within Arab and Arab American communities were no better than traitors to their people. Th result - of yet another binary structure - was that attempts to develop feminist or queer critiques were often confined between two extremes: untenable silence, on the one hand, and the reification of Orientalist representations, on the other. 

- Nadine Naber, “Decolonizing Culture: Beyond Orientalist and Anti-Orientalist Feminism,” in Arab and Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, and Belonging (2010)

anonymous asked:

Good to know you support ethnic cleansers, anti Arabs, and islamophobes like the Ypg lmao

Apologies comrade! How could I praise the scoundrels of Kurdistan and forget the primacy of the great proletarian struggle of President Bashar al-Assad, the lion of Syria!

Fuck off

Just a friendly reminder that people who use my posts about combatting anti-Semitism as their own platform for disseminating Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism can die in a fire 🙃

Confronting Anti-Black Racism in The Arab World (Important Read)


In response to an essay I wrote recently regarding the “essential blackness” of the Palestinian struggle, I received this reaction, among others: “What about Arab anti-black racism? Or the Arab slave trade?”

The Arab slave trade is a fact of history and anti-black racism is a fact of current reality, a shameful thing that must be confronted in Arab societies. Though I claim no expertise on the subject, I think that applying notions of racism as it exists in the US will preclude a real understanding of the subject in the Arab world.

I spent much of much of my youth in the Arab world and I do not recall having a race consciousness until I came to the United States at the age of 13. My knowledge of Arab anti-black racism comes predominantly from Arab Americans. Like other immigrant communities, they adopt the prevailing racist sentiments of the power structure in the US, which decidedly holds African-Americans in contempt.

This attitude is also becoming more prevalent in Arab countries for various reasons, but mostly because Arab governments, particularly those that import foreign labour from Africa and Southeast Asia, have failed to implement or enforce anti-discrimination and anti-exploitation laws.

In many Arab nations, including Kuwait where I was born, workers are lured into menial jobs where their passports are confiscated upon arrival and they are forced into humiliating and often inhuman working conditions. They have little to no protection under the law and are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, including extraordinarily long working hours, withholding of salaries, sexual, mental, and physical abuse, and denial of travel.

The recent case of Alem Dechesa brought to light the horrors faced by migrant workers in Lebanon. Dechesa, a domestic worker from Ethiopia, committed suicide after suffering terrible mental and physical abuse at the hands of her Lebanese employers, whose savage beating of her in front of the Ethiopian Consulate went viral last year.

Defining beauty

An extension to Arab anti-black racism is an aspiration to all that our former - and current - colonisers possess. Individuals aspire to what is powerful and rich, and the images of that power and wealth have light skin, straight hair, small noses, ruddy cheeks and tall, skinny bodies. That image rejects melanin-rich skin, coiled hair, broad or pointy noses, short stature, broad hips and big legs. So we, too, reject these features, despising them in others and in ourselves as symbols of inferiority, laziness, and poverty. That’s why the anglicising industries of skin bleaching and hair straightening are so profitable.

And yet, when Palestine went to the UN for recognition of statehood, the vast majority of nations who voted yes were southern nations. The same is true when Palestine asked for admission to UNESCO. In fact, when the US cut off funding to UNESCO in response to its members’ democratic vote to admit Palestine, it was the African nation of Gabon that immediately stepped up with a $2m donation to UNESCO to help offset the loss of income.

It was not Saudi Arabia, or Kuwait, or Qatar, or Lebanon, or Sweden, or France. It was Gabon. How many Palestinians know that, much less expressed gratitude for it?

So concerned are Palestinians with what the European Union and the United States think of us. So engrossed are we in grovelling for their favour and handouts as they support a system of Jewish supremacy pushing our ancient society into extinction. We dance like clowns any time a European leader spares us a thought. Have we no sense of history? No sense of pride? No comprehension of who is truly standing with us and who is sabotaging us?

In a world order that peddles notions of entire continents or regions as irreducible monoliths, the conversation among Arabs becomes a dichotomous “Arab” versus “African”, ignoring millennia of shared histories ranging from extensive trade and commerce, to the horrors of the Arab slave trade, to the solidarity of African-Arab anti-colonial unity, to the current state of ignorance that does not know history and cannot connect the dots when it comes to national liberation struggles.

Arab slave trade

When I was researching the subject of the Arab slave trade, I came upon a veritable treasure of a website established by The African Holocaust Society, or Mafaa [Swahili for “holocaust”], a non-profit organisation of scholars, artists, filmmakers, academics, and activists dedicated to reclaiming the narratives of African histories, cultures, and identities. Included in this great body of scholarly works is a comprehensive section on the Arab slave trade, as well as the Jewish slave trade, African-Arab relations over the centuries, and more, by Owen Alik Shahadah, an activist, scholar and filmmaker.

Reading this part of our shared history, we can see how a large proportion of Arabs, including those among us who harbour anti-black racism, are the sons and daughters of African women, who were kidnapped from Eastern African nations as sex slaves.

Unlike the European slave trade, the Arab slave trade was not an important feature of Arab economies and it predominantly targeted women, who became members of harems and whose children were full heirs to their father’s names, legacies and fortunes, without regard to their physical features. The enslaved were not bought and sold as chattel the way we understand the slave trade here, but were captured in warfare, or kidnapped outright and hauled across the Sahara.

Race was not a defining line and enslaved peoples were not locked into a single fate, but had opportunity for upward mobility though various means, including bearing children or conversion to Islam. No-one knows the true numbers of how many African women were enslaved by Arabs, but one need only look at ourselves to see the shadows of these African mothers who gave birth to us and lost their African identities.

But while African scholars at the Mafaa Society make important distinctions between the Arab and European slave trades, enslavement of human beings is a horror of incomprehensible proportions by any standard, and that’s what it was in the Arab world as it was - or is - anywhere. There are some who argue that the Arab slave traders were themselves indistinguishable from those whom they enslaved because the word “Arab” had cultural relevance, not racial.

One-way street

This argument goes hand-in-hand with the discredited excuse that Africans themselves were involved in the slave trade, with warring tribes capturing and selling each other. But no matter how you look at it, the slave trade was a one-way street, with Africans always the enslaved victims. I know of no African tribe that kidnapped Europeans and put them in bondage for generations; nor do I know of an African tribe that captured Arab women for centuries and made them sex slaves.

I think humanity has truly never known a holocaust of greater magnitude, savagery, or longevity than that perpetrated against the peoples of Africa. This Mafaa has never been fully acknowledged and certainly never atoned for - not that the wounds or enduring legacies of turning human beings into chattel for centuries can ever be fully comprehended or atoned for. But one must try, because just as we inherit privilege from our ancestors, so do we inherit their sins and the responsibility for those sins.

Gaddafi’s role

The late Colonel Muammar Gaddafi understood this and he used his power and wealth to try to redeem our shared history. He was the first Arab leader to apologise on behalf of Arab peoples to our African brothers and sisters for the Arab slave trade and the Arab role in the European slave trade.

He funnelled money into the African Union and used Libya’s wealth to empower the African continent and promote pan-Africanism. He was a force of reconciliation, socialism, and empowerment for both African and Arab peoples. Gaddafi’s actions threatened to renew African-Arab reconciliation and alliances similar to that which occurred at the height of the Non-Aligned Movement during the presidencies of Jamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.  

Thus, NATO’s urgency to prevent “massacres” and “slaughter” in Libya was manufactured and sold wholesale. The fear of African-Arab solidarity can be seen in the way the US-backed Libyan insurgency spread rumours that “black African” mercenaries were committing atrocities against Libyans. Gaddafi became an even bigger threat when an agreement was reached with the great anti-imperialist force in South America, Hugo Chavez, to mediate a solution to the uprising in Libya.

Now both of these champions of their people are gone, and the so-called Libyan revolutionaries are executing “black Africans” throughout the country. Gone, too, is NATO’s worry about slaughter in Libya, and another high-functioning Arab nation lies in ruin, waste and civil strife - primed for rampant corporate looting.

I wrote previously that the Palestinian struggle against the erasure of our existence, history and identity was spiritually and politically black in nature. So, too, are other struggles, like that of migrant workers throughout many Arab nations. These are our comrades. They are the wretched, exploited, robbed, and/or, at last, liberated.

I refer to Black as a political term, not necessarily a racial or ethnic descriptor. In the words of Owen Alik Shehadah: “Black People is a construction which articulates a recent social-political reality of people of colour (pigmented people). Black is not a racial family, an ethnic group or a super-ethnic group. Political Blackness is thus not an identity but moreover a social-political consequence of a world which after colonialism and slavery existed in those colour terms. The word "Black” has no historical or cultural association, it was a name born when Africans were broken down into transferable labour units and transported as chattel to the Americas.“

But that word has been reclaimed, redefined, and injected with all the power, love, defiance, and beauty that is Africa. For the rest of us, and without appropriating the word, "black” is a phenomenon of resistance, steadfastness - what we Palestinians call sumud - and the beauty of culture that is reborn out of bondage and oppression.

Right to look the other way

Finally, solidarity from Africans is not equivalent to that which comes from our European comrades, whose governments are responsible for the ongoing erasure of Palestine. African peoples have every reason to look the other way. Ethiopians have every reason to say: “You deserve what you get for the centuries of enslavement and neo-enslavement industry by your Arab neighbours.” African Americans have every reason to say: “Why should I show solidarity with Arabs who come here to treat us like white people do, and sometimes worse?”

Malcolm X once said: “If I was that [anti-American], I’d have a right to be that - after what America has done to us. This government should feel lucky that our people aren’t anti-American.”

We can substitute the word “Arab” for “American” in that sentence and it would be a valid statement. And yet, Africa is right there with us. African American intellectuals are the greatest champions of our struggle in the United States. The impact of solidarity from four particular individuals - Desmond Tutu, Alice Walker, Angela Davis and Cynthia McKinney - can never be overestimated.

Last month, the former South African ambassador to Israel refused a “certificate” from Israel confirming the planting of trees in his name. In his letter, he called Israel a racist, apartheid state and said the gift was an “offence to my dignity and integrity”. He added: “I was not a party to, and never will be, to the planting of ‘18 trees’, in my 'honour’, on expropriated and stolen land.”

I would like my countrymen to think long and hard about this until they truly comprehend the humbling beauty of this solidarity from people who have every reason to be anti-Arab. I wish my countrymen could look through my eyes. They would see that black is profoundly beautiful. They would see that Africa runs through our veins, too. Our enslaved African foremothers deserve to be honoured and loved by their Arab children. And it is for us to redeem their pain with the recognition and atonement long owed.

Arriving at this understanding is a good starting place for reciprocal solidarity with nations and peoples who are standing with us, in heart and in action.

…….

Susan Abulhawa is a Palestinian writer and the author of the international bestselling novel, Mornings in Jenin (Bloomsbury 2010). She is also the founder of Playgrounds for Palestine, an NGO for children.

Follow her on Twitter: @sjabulhawa

Source: Al Jazeera 

______________________________________________________________

The Arabic Slave Trade is something that is rarely spoken about and often goes unheard of. When we speak of the enslavement of Africans, many of us like to connect it with Europeans, which is fine, but we should never forget they were not the only ones. For over 900 years, Africans were enslaved by Arabic slave traders. They would take Africans from all over the continent including West, East, and North Africa forcing them to march thousands of miles to Slave Markets. The Men, Women, and Children were bound together by the waist and neck so that if one died the rest could drag him or her along. These walks became known as the “Death Marches” and an estimated 20 million Africans died on these walks alone. The Arabs believed it was God’s wish to see Africans enslaved and believed they were uncivilized animals. Sound Familiar? Slaves were beaten and abused regularly. Many African Women, young Girls, and Boys would be used as Sex slaves for their owners. Islamic Slave holders would stick their swords and other weapons into the Vagina’s of Black Women and cut off the penis of African Men. This was done because they believed Africans had an uncontrollable sex drive. Many Africans would be forced to convert to Islam believing if they shared the same religion, it would stop the abuse. Muslim slave traders would also promise them Freedom after conversion. This did not stop the abuse nor did it gain them their freedom. In Fact, one can argue it made them even more enslaved. When Europeans entered the slave industry, Muslim Slave traders would use the religion to exploit Islamic Africans to bring them other Africans. These Africans would then be sold to Europeans. Slavery in the holy city of Mecca would not be outlawed until 1966 and in all other Arabic countries until 1990. The Islamic Slave Trade began almost 500 years before the Europeans would come to Africa. It would be a catalyst for the dismantling of the continent and the massive expansion of the Religion. Had it not been for Islam, European Chattel Slavery may never have occurred. History is quite a teacher and once again as the late Dr. John Henrik Clarke once said, “Africa has no friends. If you want a friend, look in the mirror.”

Written by @KingKwajo - Via: SanCopha League

@ anon: Asians aren’t people of color? Really? Are you seriously telling me that (prepare for a massive picture spam) 

these people

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aren’t

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people of color

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like

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are

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you

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serious 

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(the above is a picture of Sri Lankans–if you know your geography, anon, you’d know that Sri Lanka is a country in South Asia, close to the bottom tip of India) 

No seriously, do you actually believe that all Asians are pale with “milky white skin” like most kpop idols and that’s why you have the (idk if mods consider this ableist language but I will star it out just in case) b**dbr**** idea that Asians aren’t colored because in your mind pale-skinned Asians =/= people of color? Even though, back around the Civil Rights Movement, white people told Asians they had to use facilities labeled for people of color because they didn’t see Asians, even pale-skinned Asians, as white?  

And even East Asians themselves can be people of color, as seen below: 

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(yeah Hyorin is a kpop idol but everyone knows that she naturally has darker skin compared to other kpop idols–even her audition video showed how naturally dark she was) 


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(another kpop idol, Lee Hyori, with naturally dark skin) 

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(original url for the above picture says that she’s a Chinese girl from Yunnan) 

Like oh look at the range in skin tones that Asians can have!!!! 

i know y’all want even for s4, but with all the anti-muslim and anti-arab shit going down at the moment (especially now that trump is in office), i honestly can hardly think of a better time to have sana as the main character

youtube

Have you guys seen this gem yet?

26 Questions Asians Have For White People

So true it hurts. (But also so funny.)