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Let’s Talk About Movies:

MENTAL ILLNESS PORTRAYED ON SCREEN
What makes it so appealing to the audience?

“For actors, it’s a cinematic gift, a chance to play a characteristic as well as a character. For directors, it’s a chance to explore the psyche in visual and narrative detail. For audiences, it’s a window into a world they will (hopefully) never experience. When combined in the just the right way, without histrionics or spectacle, the results can be incredible.” - Source

It seems that I have upset a lot of people with this gifset because of my lack of education and research about mental illness. If you feel insulted by this post you must know that i have no intention to be rude or disrespect to anyone my first intention is to talk about the movies and the characters. But I understand that I made a horrible mistakes. I am truly sorry for this I can only hope you would accept my apology.

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Let’s Talk About Movies:

PSYCHO (1960)
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Motifs are generally so unobtrusive in a film that they can pass unnoticed even after repeated viewings. In Psycho, for example, Hitchcock employed the “doubles” motif with great density. The 2 pairs of leading actors (Janet Leigh/Vera Miles and Anthony Perkins/John Gavin) were cast according to physical resemblances, which suggest psychological similarities. Many of the scenes feature mirrors, which reinforce the doubles motif, as well as suggesting themes of reality versus illusion, truth versus deception, and conscious behavior versus impulse.

Giannetti, Louis D. Understanding Movies second edition. New Jersey, 1976.

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“[Norman] gets out and pushes the light-toned car into the dark thick morass of waters to submerge the evidence, watching nervously and nibbling as it slowly gurgles lower and lower into the muck. He cups his hands in front of his chin, fearful that it won’t sink entirely. The car sinks only part way in - and then halts. Norman, looking remarkably like a scared bird, darts his head around anxiously. Then he grins approvingly when it is finally swallowed up…by the blackness. He is relieved that the evidence is covered up.”
-Tim Dirks