ant colonies

The Domestic Garden Witch: Making Pets Happy

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Gardening for Your Familiar

This past weekend, I went to one of my coven sisters’ place to run a game of Dungeons and Dragons. This in itself isn’t that unusual - I usually play about a game a week, and every other week is held at her place. However, she is definitely a witch who spends plenty of time both in the garden and in the kitchen! A fellow animal lover, with three cats and a couple of dogs, it’s always enjoyable to visit. What surprised me, though was an addition to her home’s normal features: a little garden close to the ground meant for her cats!

Whether a college witch or a witch who’d been practicing for a long time, it’s fair to say that many of us - dare I say that perhaps most of us - have dogs, cats, or some other kind of pet. And while there are plenty of spells out there for familiars and pets, it’s rare that I see spells focusing on gardens for them. So of course, my sister’s garden is featured this week, because it is absolutely brilliant!

A simple project, done in the same way you would any container garden, consider growing plants that your furry friends can safely consume. Where the magic comes in is the intent with which you grow your plants and with which you pot them. The example above makes use of cat grass, catnip, mint (which the kitties love to rub up against), cilantro, and parsley.

But let’s take it a step further, as there are plenty of other animals out there!

Aquatic Gardens: Just like with terrestrial pets and plants, live plants can be added to an aquarium with care. Not only do they breathe new life into your fishes’ home, but they help oxygenate the water and depending on the species of plant and fish in the environment, could provide a food source. Sometimes the plant itself is the pet, as in the case of marimo moss balls!

Terrarium Gardens: In the past, I’ve mentioned bottled gardens and terrarium gardens. Whether reptile or amphibian, plants can help provide a more natural surface for climbing, can provide a food source for herbivorous friends, and - as before - help bring more life to the terrarium!

Formicarium Gardens?: Admittedly, not everyone has a colony of ants as a domestic pet. But as with any animal, ants require care and maintenance, and a proper formicarium usually has a larger area for foraging. Though the ants will be healthy with a steady supply of feeder insects and sugars, adding plants will not only make the “outworld” a more aesthetically pleasing environment, but a more diverse one for the colony as well. In addition, ants have been known to tend to plants, harvesting sap and nectars while also keeping the plant nourished and maintained. Take it a step further by adding pitcher plants - a plant that could easily be a pet itself - which not only help control the colony population, but also promote a mutual relationship with ants (the plant offers nectar to the ants from its inactive pitchers, and while it does “eat” ants, the ants will still take care of the pitcher for the sake of the nectar).

Bringing it Outside: Some of us count horses and other outdoor animals as pets. The same principle applies - set aside a box garden specifically to help nourish your friends and bring some joy to the stable. Similarly, if you don’t have any pets, you could set up a garden to encourage wildlife. It’s not uncommon to see beautiful flower gardens for hummingbirds, fruit trees and berry bushes to encourage wild birds to visit, and gardens set off to the side specifically for deer.

What This Brings to a Witch

Part of being a witch or of being pagan is nurturing a relationship with nature. There are many ways of doing this, from adopting an organic lifestyle to assisting in conservation efforts, to even learning how to forage and to recognize various plants. But it goes without saying that pets, plants, and animals can all do much to help us learn about our role in the world. They teach us how to be ourselves, how to live in the moment. Even the ants in a formicarium can teach us about how to naturally be efficient and productive.

This in itself is magical. It’s a natural spell that is meant to enliven the spirit and while it does do quite a bit to make the animals in our lives happy and healthy (even more so when planted and grown with intent), it also turns around and gives us the very same blessing.

Grow your garden, and tend to it and your animal friends with love, and they will teach you far more than you may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O( 

youtube

Ant colonies flow like fluid to build tall towers

To cross streams or secure themselves against water currents, fire ants join forces to form rafts or build towers. Researchers have now worked out how the ants sustain tall structures without crushing their friends: they constantly circulate around the tower, behaving like a fluid.

Fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) have sticky pads on their feet that help them to assemble collectively into shapes.

Researchers had already worked out the secrets of fire ants’ raft-building techniques: the ants adhere to each other with their feet and orient themselves to create pockets of air, distributing their weight to form a buoyant structure. So a team co-led by Craig Tovey, a modelling mathematician at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, sought to find out how the insects sculpt themselves into towers.

In a laboratory, the team used high-speed cameras to record how the insects assemble around a slippery Teflon rod, and tagged half the colony with a radioactive tracer to see how the insects moved inside the tower structure.

The ants use trial and error to form a tower, continuously rebuilding weaker parts that collapse until the structure is sound. Each individual insect can support up to three other ants, the researchers found. And when an ant is overloaded, it lets go of its neighbours and sinks down the column until it emerges outside the base of the tower.

The result is a dynamic, bell-shaped structure that moves similarly to a fluid, and in which each ant carries an equal load. “The ants are circulating like a water fountain, in reverse,” says Tovey. The work is published in Royal Society Open Science1.

Across the world and for millions of years, army ant colonies have been infiltrated by impostors—beetles that pass for ants and make their living as parasites. Army ants are named for their aggressive hunting behavior, and they’re also fierce defenders of their colonies. But this hasn’t stopped several beetle species from the family Staphylidae which have evolved to infiltrate roaming army ant colonies and live in them as parasites. A new study published in the journal Current Biology finds this capacity evolved not just once, but at least a dozen times in beetle species that are only distantly related. Read more about this new research on the blog.

Humans are Weird: Hiveminds

Every time a Hivemind is introduced in sci-fi, they’re always presented as either a significant threat (like the Rachni in Mass effect) or the greatest threat to the protagonists and their civilization (like The Borg in Star Trek). The issue at hand is that once humans do make contact with alien civilizations, we’re likely going to learn that Hiveminds work more like ant colonies in that the Queens use pheromones that are only compatible with their own race. Similarly to how humans can’t really get their pets sick and vice versa, a Hivemind race would only have direct influence over its own members, thus making them a singular entity working with numerous vessels. The annoying and problematic thing would be that despite the biological compatibility making assimilation impossible, humans will still likely be dicks to a Hivemind entity:

Human: “Woah, woah, woah, Ancrinox, please stay out of my personal bubble! Go assimilate someone else!”

Ancrinox: “Human Phillip, my forms have told you on numerous occasions that we may only influence you with copious amounts of alcohol-laced beverages.”

So like I love the Modern Royals AU and coffeeshop and bookstore aus and all, but just picture normal modern life…

  • Like everyone lives really close together
  • I imagine Eustace and Edmund share an apartment at some point
  • And it’s like some 90s sitcom where everyone comes and goes from each other’s homes as they please
  • Susan being like the little mother of the group
  • She’s the one lecturing everyone about healthy choices and preaching salad while Lucy bakes a double chocolate cake that disappears within ten minutes
  • and Susan low-key surreptitiously cleaning the boys’ apartment: like putting a timed air freshener in the bathroom and an automatic shower cleaner and keeping Frebreze in her purse and empties it around the apartment before she leaves (Edmund and Eustace are pretty tidy people though, compared to Peter…no one lets Susan to go his apartment)
  • Susan and Caspian have late late night talks
  • Peter insisting everyone take self-defense classes (originally he just insisted the girls take it, but then realized if they all went together he could watch Lucy drop Caspian on his back in three seconds flat)
  • Eustace is always trying to smuggle in his bug collection, despite Edmund’s rule against it. (”No bugs, Eustace.” “But my ant colony wouldn’t be-” “No Bugs. NO. Bugs.”)
  • (So Eustace gets really excited every time there’s like a spider in the shower or something)
  • Also, Lucy calling having to call her brothers or Eustace to kill a bug when there’s one in her place
  • Really big group hugs
  • When men whistle or cat call at the girls, the guys don’t get aggressive. They just cat call the men back.
  • I bet Caspian takes Eustace clubbing just to see what happens
  • Sunday brunches
  • Edmund always runs errands for everyone, so he has a key to everyone’s places, and has thus walked in on his brother at very awkward moments.
  • Surprise parties for everyone’s birthday. (they all see it coming, they just don’t know when or where it will happen.)
  • (Like Edmund bringing Lucy groceries she asked for (which included a lot of party supplies) but when he walked into her apartment they were all there, screaming “SURPRISE,” and it scared him so badly he flung all the grocery bags at them.)
  • (But that’s nothing compared to the time they all tried to surprise Lucy by hiding so she wouldn’t see anyone until she turned on the lights, but Eustace hid behind the door and Lucy thought he was a mugger so she took him down and poor Eustace was incapacitated for the whole party.)
  • When Lucy wants to get a tattoo, she wants to get everyone’s opinion about her ideas….but first it takes her and everyone else a year and half to convince Peter to drop the patriarchy and let her get one. 
  • All night movie night where they all plan to be up until dawn but like almost everyone falls asleep after the second movie
  • Everyone always has someone to lean on and go to for any reason

After writing all of these, I feel there’s a lot of story/drabble potential. Message me if you wanna read any in particular. :)

3

In celebration of April Fools Day, we are highlighting some sneaky species! 

Hiding among dark foliage, the owl butterfly shows its “eye” (located on both wings) to pose as an owl and avoid predators. 

Meet Thaumoctopus mimicus: the amazing octopus that has the ability to mimic multiple, different species at will!

Masters of infiltration, copycat beetles mimic the shape, behavior, and even pheromones of army ants to invade their colonies. Can you tell which is which?

Requested by @jakesteinberg

Aromatisse is a smelly pokémon. According to the pokédex, it can produce all sorts of smells, both pleasant and unpleasant, to gain an edge in battle. While scent may not be the first thought that crosses your mind if you’re out to sabotage your enemies, it is certainly an effective technique. Let’s look at some of the plants and animals in our world that use the same strategy as Aromatisse!

First and most obviously, let’s talk about flowers. Flowers are the reproductive organs of plants, and they largely rely on pollinators like bees or butterflies to reproduce by spreading their pollen around. Because of this, flowers evolved to smell pleasantly, which attracts these pollinators to them. Other carnivorous plants, like venus flytraps (Carnivine) or pitcher plants (Victreebel), they smell nice to lure in their prey. In most plants, the scent is produced in their petals. In others, namely orchids, have special organs called osmophores which are responsible for producing the scent.

Having a gland to produce scent isn’t exclusive to the plant kingdom. Skunks have two scent-producing glands at the base of their tail. These glands produce a sulfur-based compound called thiol, which is responsible for the notoriously bad smell. When threatened, the skunk can control the muscles around the glands to spray up to 10 meters away with great accuracy, releasing the awful scent and persuading predators that if it smells that bad, the skunk can’t possibly taste good enough to eat.

Other animals that use glands to produce scents include the opossum, which uses a foul scent to improve its facade when it plays dead. Tasmanian Devils, which produce an odor when they’re stressed out. The lesser anteater, who’s defensive stench is 7x more smelly than a skunk.

Many bugs also have smelly capabilities. The Bombardier beetle stores two chemicals in its body: hydroquinone and hydrogen peroxide. When it is threatened, it will mix the two together, setting off a horrible chemical reaction that creates a stinky, explosive, and hot (100 degrees C) spray to ward off its enemies.

Other animals which aren’t capable of producing scents by themselves employ more creative techniques. Some vultures, for example, will vomit if they’re threatened. Vultures are scavengers, so many of their meals consist of rotting flesh. Not that barf smells good to begin with, but I’d imagine that just makes it worse. It’s certainly an effective way or warding off predators. 

Similarly, the Hoatzin, also called the a stinkbird, uses its bad-smelling food to its advantage. Stinkbirds have a unique digestive system, like a cow, which relies on bacteria to break down food instead of having stomach acid. This results in the stinkbird smelling like manure, just all the time.

But not all scents in the animal kingdom have to be bad, either. In fact, some animals smell very peculiar. The binturong bearcat produces a compound called 2-AP in its urine. Coincidentally, 2-AP is the same compound that gives popcorn its distinct smell. So, binturong urine smells exactly like popcorn.

Some stick insects produce a peppermint smell. Yellow ant colonies smell like lemons. Spadefoot Toads smell like peanut butter. Beavers have scent glands like a skunk, but uses it to mark its territory instead of as a defense mechanism. The goo it produces, called castoreum, shares so many similarities with vanilla that beavers have historically been “milked” so the castoreum can be used as artificial vanilla flavors in food.

And yet, so far all the creatures we’ve talked about can only produce one single scent. Aromatisse has a scent for every occasion–and some animals do that too. The sea hare, a fascinating undersea mollusc, produces an ink to scare off predators. The ink is both poisonous and foul-smelling, but interestingly enough, the ink’s color, composition, and scent can be changed based on the sea hare’s diet.

Sometimes, the ink can be very attractive to lobsters and other natural predators of the sea hare. If it gets captured, the sea hare will produce this ink and the lobster will drop the sea hare in favor of eating the delicious ink instead. Another kind of ink it produces is disgusting towards its predators, scaring them off like a skunk’s spray and many other animals’ defenses we’ve talked about. Another kind of ink still neither repels nor attracts predators, but effectively blocks the predator’s nose-nerves from talking to their brains, inhibiting their sense of smell altogether. It basically gives them a stuffy nose, so they are unable to smell at all. This causes the lobster to immediately stop what its doing and focus on cleaning off its smell receptors, giving the sea hare plenty of time to escape.

Bringing this back to Aromatisse, this fairy-type pokémon must have several different ways of producing scents. It likely has one if not multiple scent glands, which produce different compounds and different smells. Additionally, it might use things like its urine, its digestive system and diet to produce different smells. These fragrances have a variety of different uses, from defense mechanisms like convincing predators it doesn’t taste good, or pretending its dead, to blocking off the enemy’s senses to weaken it during battle. Other scents may help attract prey and food straight to Aromatisse. Others may help calm allies during battle. 

Aromatisse is capable of producing many different scents using special glands, its digestive system, chemical reactions and more. It produces odors as defense to scare away predators, and as offense to weaken or attract prey.

Does all of that make scents? Aromatisse does!

I really love Brazilian folklore characters

* theres a headless mule who still spits fire somehow (Mula-sem-cabeça/Headless mule);
* a ghost boy that haunts fields because he suffered a horrible death by being dumped into a poisionous ant colony (Negrinho do pastoreio/Black boy from the fields);
* a forest boy-thing that has his feet backwards and plays pranks on people who want to harm the rainforest (Curupira);
* a man that carries around a big sack to kidnap kids who misbehave (Homem-do-saco/sack man);
* a mermaid who lives in the rivers in the north of brazil and lures men into the dangerous waters (Iara);
* a pink dolphin-thing that has the power to transform into a handsome young man every ‘festa junina’ [which is a party that happens in june] and he dances with all the unacompanied women, and sometimes lures them into the lake and knock them up (Boto-cor-de-rosa/Pink boto);
* a black boy that has only one leg and he goes around playing pranks on people, and the only way to capture him is to throw a sieve into a swirl (Saci Pererê);
* an old woman that has a face like a crocodile’s who eats children (Cuca);
* a giant snake that has flaming eyes, who sometimes burns the forest and other times he protects it from wildfires for some reason (Boitatá);

quiet at least

in the field behind my parents’ house, there is an out-of-use railroad track long since rusted over. i am blue today so that’s where i go. in the white dress with my book and cigarettes, i go there to be lonely, and okay within that loneliness. it’s not a pretty place, but it’s quiet at least. the ants are on me the moment i bring out my tupperware of strawberries. i don’t mind them. i say hello ants, how’s the colony? hello little ants. hello, hello. this is strange behaviour, especially for someone who normally reels at the sight of anything with more than four legs, but some days i am blue and when i’m blue, i am not myself. or i am entirely myself. i come to here to figure that out. it doesn’t help, but it’s quiet at least. i like to underline things as i read, anything that twists me, like my sister performing a chinese burn on my forearm when i was younger. that sudden heat, that red flare. days like this i tie my hair up and move my head side to side just to feel it swish. i am that awful person that licks her finger to turn a page. i’ve a thing about fingers - about hands, and wrists. i like to watch the tendons move as someone types or cracks their knuckles. like to faux-read peoples’ palms, making up versions of their future, sometimes putting myself in them. ooh, this line shows a dark-haired girl who’ll tempt you into loving her. beware. i brown beneath the sun all day, grow hot and languid. this is how i beat the blues: i tire them out. like children, they spend a few hours in the sun and are soon ready to be put to bed. i tuck them in, kiss their foreheads; their eyelids flutter and they’re gone. just me in the field, applying and reapplying chapstick, listening to the birds be birds, weaving blades of grass together. nothing special or revolutionary, but once again: it’s quiet at least.

2

Mehmed the Conqueror and Radu, son of Dracul.

And my translation of Sultan’s poem under his pen name Avni, ghazal (lyric poetry) no.2:

If my eyes shed tears of my heart’s pain about you,
Then my secret concealed would be obvious to you

You sit on the throne of beauty, while I stand on the soil of the road.
How should I help myself, an ant, while you are my Süleyman?

See him, the candle who is weeping at the gathering,
Oh, you are the beautiful candle who illuminates my room!

When the morning comes I am faithful,  but love-stricken
When the day will end, oh you, my shining crescent!

Yesterday my rivals cried out their pain with grief,
The pursuers of love have suffered the misfortunes you had inflicted upon me.

My friend, it isn’t possible to explain the wound of heart’s pain,
That burning flash in my chest will show it to you.

Stop ruining Avni’s eyes and heart with your torture,
Because the pit of my sea can give pearls and jewels to you.

Avni. Translated from ottoman Turkish ©Elveo

Commentary for Poem of Mehmed i-Sani, Ghazal no.2

*Ghazal from arabic: ḡazala, “to display love to the loved one via speech, to exchange talk of love with the loved one”.

1. Çeşm-i giryânım – literally ‘my tears shed from eyes’ (çeşm [cheshm] – Persian word for eyes, ottoman Turkish has many Persian terms; giryân – in Ottoman Turkish literally means 'tears rolling ’ or to 'shed tears’)

Keep reading

Animals You Didn't Know Existed

1. The Dhole

The Dhole is a species of canid native to South and Southeast Asia. The dhole is a highly social animal, living in large clans which occasionally split up into small packs to hunt. It primarily preys on medium-sized ungulates, which it hunts by tiring them out in long chases, and kills by disemboweling them. Though fearful of humans, dhole packs are bold enough to attack large and dangerous animals such as wild boar, water buffalo, and even tigers.

2. The Babirusa 

Babirusa, meaning “Hog-deer”, are members of the pig family found in Wallacea, or specifically the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Togian, Sula and Buru. If a babirusa does not grind its tusks (achievable through regular activity), they will eventually keep growing so as to penetrate the animal’s own skull.

3. Pink Fairy Armadillo

The pink fairy armadillo is approximately 3.5-4.5 inches long, excluding the tail, and is pale rose or pink in color. It has the ability to bury itself completely in a matter of seconds if frightened. It is a nocturnal animal and it burrows small holes near ant colonies in dry soil, and feeds mainly on ants and ant larvae near its burrow. It uses large front claws to agitate the sand, allowing it to almost swim through the ground like it is water. It is torpedo-shaped, and has a shielded head and back.

4. The Fossa

The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island of Madagascar and has been compared to a small cougar. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree.

5. The Gerenuk

The gerenuk, also known as the Waller’s gazelle, is a long-necked species of antelope found in dry thorn bush scrub and desert in Eastern Africa. The word gerenuk comes from the Somali language, meaning “giraffe-necked”. Gerenuks have a relatively small head for their body, but their eyes and ears are proportionately large. Gerenuks seldom graze but browse on prickly bushes and trees, such as acacias. They can reach higher branches and twigs than other gazelles and antelope by standing erect on their rear legs and stretching their elongated necks.

6.Naked Mole Rat

This creature has a lot of characteristics that make it very important to human beings. For one it is resistant to cancer. They also live up to 28 years, which is unheard of in mammals of its size. It seemingly does not age much in those 28 years either. It remains “young, healthy and fully fertile for almost all its days, which for an elderly animal is equivalent to an 80-year-old woman having the biological make-up of someone 50 years younger.” The naked mole rat is used in both cancer research and the study of aging. Not only making it a bizarre creature, but an incredibly important creature as well.

7. Irrawaddy Dolphin 

The Irrawaddy dolphin is a species of oceanic dolphin found near sea coasts and in estuaries and rivers in parts of the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. Genetically, the Irrawaddy dolphin is closely related to the killer whale.

8. Markhor

The markhor is a large species of wild goat that is found in northeastern Afghanistan and Pakistan. The species is classed by the IUCN as Endangered, as there are fewer than 2,500 mature individuals. The markhor is the national animal of Pakistan. While chewing the cud, a foam-like substance comes out of its mouth which drops on the ground and dries. This foam-like substance is sought after by the local people, who believe it is useful in extracting snake poison from snake bitten wounds.

9. Yeti Crab

Also known as the Kiwaidae, this crab is a type of marine decapod living at deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. The animals are commonly referred to as “yeti crabs” because of their claws and legs, which are white and appear to be furry like the mythical yeti

10. Snub-Nosed Monkey

Snub-nosed monkeys live in various parts of Asia and get their name from the short stump of a nose on their round face. Snub-nosed monkeys inhabit mountain forests, in the winter moving into deeply secluded regions. They spend the majority of their life in the trees and live together in very large groups of up to 600 members. They have a large vocal repertoire, calling sometimes solo while at other times together in choir-like fashion.

11. The Maned Wolf

The Maned Wolf is the largest canid in South America, resembling a large fox with reddish fur. This mammal is found in open and semi-open habitats, especially grasslands with scattered bushes and trees throughout South America. The maned wolf is the tallest of the wild canids and it’s long legs are most likely an adaptation to the tall grasslands of its native habitat.

12. Southern Right Whale Dolphin

The southern right whale dolphin is a small and slender species of mammal found in cool waters of the southern hemisphere. They are fast active swimmers and have no visible teeth and no dorsal fin. They are very graceful and often move by leaping out of the water continuously

13. Southern Red Muntjac

Found in south Asia, it has soft, short, brownish or greyish hair and is omnivorous, feeding on grass, fruits, shoots, seeds, birds’ eggs as well as small animals. It sometimes even displays scavenging behavior, feeding on carrion. It gives calls similar to barking, usually upon sensing a predator. Males are extremely territorial and—despite their diminutive size—can be quite fierce. They will fight each other for territory using their antlers or their tusk-like upper canine teeth, and can even defend themselves against certain predators such as dogs.

14. Cyphonia Clavata 

It is a species of treehopper called Cyphonia Clavata that literally has an ant growing out of its head. Well not literally, the ant-like thing on its head is an appendage that hides the treehopper’s actual body from predators.

15. Sunda Colugo

Also known as The Sunda flying lemur, it is not actually a lemur and does not fly. Instead, it glides as it leaps among trees. It is strictly arboreal, is active at night, and feeds on soft plant parts such as young leaves, shoots, flowers, and fruits. The Sunda Coluga can be found throughout Southeast Asia in Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore

16. Tufted Deer

The Tufted Deer is a small species of deer characterized by the prominent tuft of black hair on its forehead. It is a close relative of the muntjac, living somewhat further north over a wide area of central China. It is a timid animal, mainly solitary or found in pairs and prefers places with good cover, where it is well camouflaged.

17. Lamprey

Lampreys are a type of jawless fish that live mostly in coastal and fresh waters whose adults are characterized by a toothed, funnel-like sucking mouth. They attach themselves to fish and suck their blood. Lampreys have been around for nearly 300 millions years and their body structure has remained relatively unchanged.

18. Raccoon Dog

The Raccoon Dog, or Tanuki, is a canid indigenous to East Asia. The raccoon dog is named for its resemblance to the raccoon, to which it is not closely related. They are very good climbers and regularly climb trees.

19. The Patagonian Mara

The Patagonian Mara is a relatively large rodent found in parts of Argentina. This herbivorous, somewhat rabbit-like animal has distinctive long ears and long limbs and its hind limbs are longer and more muscular than its forelimbs.

20. The Amazonian Royal Flycatcher

The Amazonian Royal Flycatcher is found in forests and woodlands throughout most of the Amazon basin. They are about 6 ½ inches in length and like to dart out from branches to catch flying insects or pluck them from leaves. They build very large nests (sometimes up to 6 feet long) on a branches near water. The nest hangs over the water which makes it hard for predators to reach.

21. Zebra Duiker

The zebra duiker is a small antelope found in Ivory Coast and other parts of Africa. They have gold or red-brown coats with distinctive zebra-like stripes (hence the name) Their prong-like horns are about 4.5 cm long in males, and half that in females. They live in lowland rainforests and mostly eat leaves and fruit.

22. Star-Nosed Mole

The star-nosed mole is a small mole found in wet low areas of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. It is easily identified by the 11 pairs of pink fleshy appendages ringing its snout, which is used as a touch organ with more than 25,000 minute sensory receptors, known as Eimer’s organs, with which this hamster-sized mole feels its way around.

Link!