anoushka-shankar

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“George kept up a relationship with everybody on that stage, like old friend’s week; old pals on stage, hanging out in rehearsals and backstage. It was a great way of getting closure because we all had our stories and our memories, our laughter and sad points of view. It was so great to be around all these people. We could laugh and cry about different moments in our lives with George.” -Ringo Starr [November 29, 2002]

George Harrison and Ravi Shankar, Benares, India, 1974

“On other occasions Raviji and George Harrison visited our ashram together. We always welcomed them as old friends, and we seemed to share so many things in common. George is another inspired child like Raviji, full of fun and stories, yet eager to embrace the adventure of spirit. Many times we talked late into the night and also sat in silence. To my mind, their bond is like a relationship out of scripture: father and son, teacher and disciple, divine and unconditional friends.” - Swami Mitrananda, Encinitas, California, September 2001, Bapi - Love of My Life by Anoushka Shankar

M.I.A will be featured on Anoushka Shankar’s new album “Land of Gold”

Anoushka is an Indian classical singer who plays the sitar. She is the daughter of one of the most famous Indian classical singers Ravi Shankar. She has been nominated for a Grammy five times and received the Woman of the Year award in 2003, as well as a British House of Commons Shield in 1998. 

Anoushka is also a sexual abuse survivor and has commited her time and money to helping women who have gone through the same experiences and provide solidarity and support for them. She is also the spokesperson for the United Nations “World Food Progamme” in India and now lives in London with her husband and two sons.

Her new album “Land Of Gold” will be focussing on the world refugee crisis. M.I.A. will feature on Track 3 - “Jump In (Cross The Line)” and is noted as a composer, singer and writer. It was recorded in October 2015 and also features Blaqstarr as a programmer for the track.

The album will be released on the 15th of April. 

George Harrison with Ravi Shankar, and others, India, 1966; screen capped from Living in the Material World

“‘My heart melted with love for George,’ Bapi says emotionally. 'His quest was beautiful and sincere, and considering he was such a star, he was nevertheless quite humble, with a childlike quality that he has retained to this day.’”

Keep reading

Watch on mensanimuscorpus.tumblr.com

Anoushka Shankar - Bhairavi

I saw her live tonight. Brilliant performance. <3

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“That was the perfect idea. You have all your best pals on there being groovy and making it interesting. I mean if I had a ‘special’, I’d like to, you know, have a few people who mean something to me.” -George, Concert For George book website, Genesis Publications

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Lifetime Achievement Award: Ravi Shankar

Norah Jones and Anoushka Shankar accept the Recording Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award on behalf of their father, the late Ravi Shankar.

George Harrison and embraces:

“George [Harrison] was the kind of guy who wasn’t going to leave until he hugged you for five minutes and told you how much he loved you.” - Tom Petty, Rolling Stone, 17 January 2002 [x]

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LASYA - ANOUSHKA SHANKAR 

Although she’s not my favourite sitarist, Anoushka Shankar shines in the new video for ‘Lasya’ - one of the tracks from her recent album 'Traces of You’. 

Filmed in a pretty swanky, opulent house in London, the video features fantastic Carnatic percussionist Pirashanna Thevarajah and the magical hands of Manu Delago on the hangdrum. 

Anoushka and her band will be on tour in Europe and will hit London at Southbank Centre during Alchemy Festival on May 23rd. 

Grab your tickets here!

- S

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The Shankars and the Harrisons (images found online, sources unspecified except image 4: Carol-Anne Lennie)

The following is Anoushka Shankar’s dedication, typed up from her wonderful book Bapi - Love Of My Life (found, to my delight, in New Delhi):

“People might be confused to find that Uncle George is still referred to in the present tense throughout the book. I actually finished writing it a couple of months before he passed away, and after much thought I decided that the book should stay as it was, because changing all those references to the past tense would change the entire feel of the book. I couldn’t have just changed the tense without adding more about him, about his death, the sense of pain and loss we all feel and the set memories we have. But the truth is I just don’t know how to write about all that. Losing him was a devastating blow to me, to my mother, and of course, to my father. And for one of the few times in my life, I don’t know how to express that in words. When I think of him I feel at a loss, and it surprises me that he’s not just somewhere, in England or in Hawaii or in the garden. I’ve spent my whole life seeing Bapi’s family and close friends pass away. Somehow because of the age difference between Bapi and me, from childhood, a part of me has always steeled itself subconsciously agains that fact that he, and the people in his life, are mortal, that death is a possibility, and indeed, an imminent certainty. But death wasn’t supposed to happen to Uncle George. Not yet. He was younger than my father, like a son to him. And when he died, I realized that he was like a father to me. I realized… how do I put it? I realized that somewhere in me, with the part of me that was always scared that my father would leave me too soon, I had always felt Uncle George would be there through that. I think a small part of me was reassured by the fact that at least I would have him, if in some horrible event I lost my father. The two of them were so close that I felt Bapi would be there with me, through Uncle George. I now that doesn’t make any sense, and how morbid it sounds, but that’s how Uncle George was to me, almost like an extension of my own father. I can’t even imagine what his own son Dhani has been going through and my heart aches for him. I’ve only seen Olivia once since her husband passed away but through all the pain I saw a strength a d a courage which was inspirational. They, and all of us who knew him, are surrounded by the immense love, wisdom and laughter he left us; from that we draw strength and for that I am eternally grateful.” - Anoushka Shankar, Bapi - Love Of My Life