anonymous artists

anonymous asked:

don't you think Liam talking about Cheryl and Bear in every interview is a part of his promo marketing plan?? I mean- when Louis was asked about Freddo in every interview blogs were like "Louis is so much more than a dad, all they ask him is about Freddie- they diminish him down to just a father, why don't they ask him about other things than Freddo" yet when Liam is asked about Bear in every interview people just compare it to babygate 1.0 ....Liam is much more than Cheryl's fake bf and a 'dad'

Yes, I agree. And yes, it’s being used for promo. People should indeed focus more on his work, but yikes personal life sells a lot (fake or not). And well, we can’t help not to compare when there’s such a stark contrast

anonymous asked:

Isn't it funny how not once in the 10 years of Taylor's career that she complained or shown some sort of irritation when people compared her to so and so.

Of course she didn’t, because she’s gracious and kind and knows a compliment when she sees one. 

anonymous asked:

If the art was that good people would see it anyway. Without the artist needing to reblog it 100 times

I see you’re stemming from liv’s @larvesta own answer about this and I’m not gonna lie, I’m really hesitant about saying anything on the matter bc i don’t do this kind of thing but I realise people actually think this way so here’s a proper answer. 

It doesn’t work that way. I should know, I should really know. People here on Tumblr get lucky often and you wouldn’t think that, especially if you don’t create content yourself. Things just don’t become popular all of a sudden, most of the time it needs to get reblogged by the right person and add the balance between having good content yourself as well as an ongoing status as a creator. Not to mention how you go about treating your followers, your personality and how you act here. And you’ll tell me; “But people with good art have so many notes! It must be because they’re good! See, you don’t need to reblog it so many times!”

I hope you know what it feels like to be an artist here because I do. I especially do. I have talked, reblogged, supported, and have met so many, too many artists here, some insanely obscure. Some whose work looks like it took so many hours and has very little over 50 notes; my work included. And I can tell you now that I can personally handpick and tell you that some of the work I’m most proud of and have took many hours on are not over 200 notes. I’m not saying I’m frustrated by that, because some of us are reassured in our skill but let me tell you that every time I think of a fellow artist out there who releases amazing art and earns very little notes who looks at their note count and wonders if they are good enough, my heart breaks. And there’s young artists who are still getting by, who are not as good yet but took the same amount of effort and time, they deserve to be cheered on. 

Because people think artists here are machines, capable of creating content without regards to who actually appreciates it. No one is like that, artists are fragile just like everyone else and people really forget that. They really do. 

People don’t just see the art out of nowhere, do you understand the huge amount in this platform? There’s millions of work everywhere, you need to be supported to be seen, you need to withstand the thousands of others around you and you might have to create something that’s away from the norm to stand out, you might have to take hours of your time. You don’t know unless you really indulge yourself this platform, you don’t know unless you yourself do work for more than four hours, no breaks and absolutely tired, and look at your note count to see a disheartening number. You have no idea, you really don’t.

And don’t guilt them, please. I could reblog my art so many times, but sometimes the thougt of ‘maybe it gets annoying’ always bears in my mind, artists are made to feel like it’s okay that they’re not being appreciated. I’m proud of those who reblog their art because they know they deserve better, and guess what? They do.  

There’s a difference between good content and popular content, popular content aimed towards a specific audience that you know will like and reblog that. Good content is a dangerous hit and miss. I really appreciate people who do art for things that are not popular, because sometimes they really do have to rely solely on their skills. I say it’s a dangerous hit and miss because you know it might not have that specific audience, but you still take the effort and time into it anyway. Imagine that; knowing something is popular but going for the alternative anyway; taking time, taking effort, putting your all into it. That’s absolutely insane, man. Imagine knowing you can put that time and effort into something popular that might attract way more notes, but still doing something else for the sake of that something else. 

Also there’s the matter of timezones, in which there’s a worldly concept that everyone is in different times and not everyone is here at the same time to see the same content. I don’t want to explain this; please at least understand the concept of time. 

Artists reblog their work because they want others to see it, to appreciate it. Because sometimes it’s the only way others can. Reblogging their own work is an artist’s way of supporting themselves and you think I’m going to let you let them think that that’s a bad thing? That they’re not allowed to do that? Go home, buddy. 

I don’t have anything against anyone, I just wrote this realising that people actually think this is actually how it works and even then, I don’t have anything against you, maybe you’re just misinformed, some just don’t know enough about this to really understand. 

So here it is buds: support artists supporting themselves. It’s as simple as that. 

anonymous asked:

lance,,, Keith,,,, the lights of my life,,,, where are your shades or safety glasses on that motorcycle,,,, you will get dirt or rocks in your eyes,,, (I'm not trying to be rude and point out mistakes btw. this isn't meant to offend in anyway, I'm just trying to encourage good safety procedures. I see a lot of art where they don't have things covering their eyes and that's really dangerous)

Bonus from

LMAO, it is so true, noni!!
No offense taken at all, you are absolutely right XD
 and safety is the most important part (and keith should know it)

anonymous asked:

hOW DO YOU DO THE SHAKY EFFECT WHEN YOU DO MEME ART LIKE IT'S KINDA BLURRY BUT NOT UHM SORRY IF I'M NOT MAKING ANY SENSE I JUST LIVE OFF YOUR ART ALSO IT'S SUPER LATE AND NOW IM CURIOUS PLEASE QUENCH MY KNOWLEDGE

I got you

filter > blur > radial blur > spin

keep the amount at about 4-10 unless you want to be extremely SHOOK 

also works with nyoom !!!
filter > blur > radial blur > zoom 
(you can put the amount at 10+ for this, it’s hella)

and also filter > blur > motion blur
(I used this one a lot for the laugh in that one video)

anonymous asked:

I'm kinda ashamed to ask this, but could you make a tutorial on how to draw hands? ;A;

omg dont be ashamed at all!! Hands are generally tough to get used to, lots of artists struggle with it! so dont be ashamed i feel you.

and I actually have made a hand anatomy guide before in fact! If you want to get better at drawing hands I def recommend you learn the basic anatomy first. Please check out the ones I made, I try to make it simple and easy to understand:

There’s my guide to the anatomy, but here’s some more tips that I’ve noted to myself that I’d like to include

First off, I’d like to just note on the fingers: if you pay close attention to your own hand, you may notice the fingers are ever ever so slightly curved inward. It’s a very subtle detail, but I noticed that, despite how slight it is, it can make a hand look more lively, and less stiff.

Second, the “M” on the palm! Your hand moves in many ways, and because it does it creates creases in your hand. The most prominent creases appear to make an M shape; this is handy to remember for what I’m going to talk about next. (It also could be a “W” I guess, or to be more specific a “ )X( “; just think of it in whatever way helps you remember!)

SO now that you see the M, draw your hand as a basic blocked shape and add your details. As you do, you can see that the M divides the palm into four basic parts!

When the hand moves, parts A, B, or C of the palm, alone or in different combos, will create the general poses that the hands do normally. These parts are the parts that move, with D being stationary, no matter what!

Here’s a chart of all the possible combos. Once you have down what part of the hand moves for a certain pose, you can change up the fingers and tweak it a bit to do what you need to make it more specific!

This is simply my method of drawing hands. God knows there are hundreds of tutorials out there by other artists, but personally, this way helps me the best (after learning the anatomy first). 

This way I can divide the hand and combine the parts in any such way I need! 

Hands take a lot of effort to grapple, and you need to practice them a lot, especially foreshortening of the hand; that’s really something you need to learn through your own studies. Look at your own hands, draw hands from life, from magazines, shows, comics; just draw hands! You’ll eventually figure out a method that works best for you. So to get better at drawing hands; draw hands!! And don’t stress over it, have fun with it!

anonymous asked:

How do you draw hair? Whenever I try it just *exaggerated hand motion meaning giant mess*

To be honest, that’s pretty much how I draw hair, too. And honestly? Hair is such a complex, diverse thing. There’s a millions of ways to draw hair based on style and texture. I’ve gotten many asks considering hair, and really, I’ve always been a bit confused on how to answer since hair comes in so many different forms. But! Giving it thought, I realized I can give you a really quick, “basic” guide, until I get a more specific question regarding hair.

So, the first step is to draw the hairlines. Hairlines is basically the “hat” of your head, and is what shapes the forehead. Drawing this before you add hair as a guide will be extremely helpful with the hairstyle, and it adds to the the facial features as well. There’s many different types hairlines, as shown here, and they may all vary in height or shape. Go wild, be experimental! Remember that this is a guide, however, so once you have the hair drawn out, make sure that the hairline isn’t as visible as it is here, but drawn as fine lines instead.

The next thing you can do is to draw a point somewhere on the head which will define the volume and the direction of the hair. This is extremely helpful, since you can draw all the hair strands starting from this point. They may start wherever you find fitting, and you may add more than one (although that adds to the complexity!)

The next step is to think in shapes overlapping each other.  For wavy hair, I like to draw the shapes as teardrops. For puffy hair I like to draw it in circles and ovals. And for straight hair, I like to think in rectangles. It’s all very simple: use the guides mentioned earlier to place the shapes on the head, making them overlap each other until you’re satisfied. Be as messy or simple as you want, and draw them however you’d like as long as it works for you. Don’t try to details yet, though, focus on shapes!

Once you’re satisfied with your result, you may draw the details to your liking. This, I think requires a tutorial on it’s own since hair textures can vary greatly. I’ll show you a quick example below, but again, this isn’t something that works with all hair types. And naturally, once you’re done, remove the head-shape outline. I kept it here just so that you could see how the hair is placed on top of it.

And as you can see, this method works with short hairstyles as well!

In fact, it works for any hairstyle, and you may even mix the basic shapes to get a unique look. (Ignore the lack of pen pressure on this one)

Now, I realize that the ‘finished’ result can be a bit difficult for some to imagine drawing. Again, I still think this requires a tutorial on it’s own, but I will show you how I do it with one of the hairstyles. 

(As you can see, I haven’t drawn out the hairline or a “point”, but this isn’t because I don’t need to, but because I already have it mentally drawn out, it’s not required for this drawing. For some hairstyles, however, I do still draw the hairline/point, especially if the hair is pulled back. But for the sake of simplicity, I will keep it, well, simple.)

Notice how I draw the shapes just as mentioned before? Here, I draw very fine lines in vague teardrop shapes, which I overlay as I draw.

Adding more for volume…

Finishing the look, keep adding more layers…

Defining the “point” as a detail, so that it doesn’t look like some horribly made wig…

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