anne & gilbert

Five reasons to watch Netflix's new Anne of Green Gables adaption, Anne With An "E"...

So I didn’t think I would need to make a post like this but negative reviews that don’t do the show justice (particularly that horrible vanity fair article) have apparently left me no choice….
Overall, Netflix’s Anne With An “E” or simply Anne The Series as it was called when it originally aired on the CBC in Canada, is wonderful. 

here are five reasons why you should watch Anne With An “E” on Netflix:

1. Anne herself, Amybeth McNulty. 

Originally posted by greengableslover

Amybeth completely captures Anne’s spirit. I swear it’s like someone shook the book and Amybeth fell out of it. She plays Anne with all the dreaminess, quirkiness, and charm that we know and love, as well as adding more depth to her than we’ve seen in previous adaptions. This brings me to my next point…

2. Anne is portrayed as an abuse and trauma survivor, as she should be! 

Sure, we all love the lighthearted humor of Anne’s many misadventures in the original stories, and that’s still there in Anne With An “E”, but Anne was also the victim of a lot of mental and physical neglect and abuse in her past life before being adopted by the Cuthberts. In the show, she suffers from symptoms of PTSD and the effects of her past trauma are evident. The result of adding more details of Anne’s past do make the show darker at times, but the dark times only make the light times shine brighter, and we know there are more light times to come in Anne’s story!

3. Besides Amybeth, the rest of the cast is superb as well! 

All around, the casting is spot on and the acting is spectacular! I don’t even know what else to say here, but everyone is just so wonderful!!!

And don’t think I’d forget… you can count on me to give a special shout-out to everyone’s favorite slate smack recipient, Gilbert Blythe.  

Originally posted by violentfille

Lucas Jade Zumann is PERFECT as Gilbert. He brings a slyness and playfulness to Gilbert that was there in the books but glossed over in other adaptions. And by the way, his chemistry with Amybeth McNulty is everything you could ever ask for and more…

Originally posted by violentfille

(side note: I would also like to throw out a special mention to Aunt Josephine Barry, no spoilers but she’s more lovable than she’s ever been)

4. The show tackles timeless and contemporary themes of identity, feminism, bullying, and prejudice.

Anne’s life, realistically, doesn't become all sunshine and rainbows as soon as she comes to Avonlea. She struggles to fit in and faces bullying at school. The show also addresses issues of sexism and classism and does a great job at it while accurately (for the most part) staying within the time period it is portraying. 

5. Everything about the show is high quality.    

From the aforementioned acting to the cinematography, music, costume design, sets, editing, and the GORGEOUS opening title sequence, everything is the highest quality and you can tell how much thought, time, effort, and passion went into the making of this show. 


Please give it a chance and check it out on Netflix, given the opportunity the show could grow and get even better if it is renewed for future seasons!

10

Gilbert Blythe wasn’t used to putting himself out to make a girl look at him and meeting with failure. She SHOULD look at him, that red-haired Shirley girl with the little-pointed chin and the big eyes that weren’t like the eyes of any other girl in Avonlea school. Gilbert reached across the aisle, picked up the end of Anne’s long red braid, held it out at arm’s length and said in a piercing whisper: “Carrots! Carrots!” Then Anne looked at him with a vengeance! She did more than look. She sprang to her feet, her bright fancies fallen into cureless ruin. She flashed one indignant glance at Gilbert from eyes whose angry sparkle was swiftly quenched in equally angry tears. “You mean, hateful boy!” she exclaimed passionately. “How dare you!” And then—thwack! Anne had brought her slate down on Gilbert’s head and cracked it—slate not head—clear across. - Chapter 15 - A Tempest in the School Teapot

Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe - The famous “Carrots” and slate scene.