ann-getty

2

Actress Carrie Fisher, beloved for her iconic role as Princess Leia, died on Tuesday at the age of 60.

She leaves behind her daughter, Billie Lourd, her brother, Todd Fisher, her mother, Debbie Reynolds — and her French bulldog, Gary.

Gary Fisher is a celebrity in his own right — he traveled widely with Fisher and was a star on Instagram and Twitter.

And when Carrie Fisher visited NPR’s studios in New York City, to talk to Fresh Air host Terry Gross, Gary came along, too.

Gross, however, was in Philadelphia. She didn’t know there was a dog in our studios. She didn’t even know that was allowed.

In the conversation that followed, it’s impossible to miss the buoyant personalities of both Fishers — Carrie and Gary.

LISTEN: Carrie Fisher, Terry Gross — And Gary The Dog

Photos: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images; Robin Marchant/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

4

Images (clockwise from top left): Jack London (Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images), Haruki Murakami (Michal Cizek/AFP/Getty Images), David Mitchell (Torsten Silz/AFP/Getty Images), Anne Bronte (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

This week in author birthdays, Jan. 12 seems especially blessed by the muses …

Jack London – Jan. 12, 1876

“He had no conscious knowledge of death, but like every animal of the Wild, he possessed the instinct of death. To him it stood as the greatest of hurts. It was the very essence of the unknown; it was the sum of the terrors of the unknown, the one culminating and unthinkable catastrophe that could happen to him, about which he knew nothing and about which he feared everything.”
From White Fang

Haruki Murakami – Jan. 12, 1949

 “Lost opportunities, lost possibilities, feelings we can never get back. That’s part of what it means to be alive. But inside our heads – at least that’s where I imagine it – there’s a little room where we store those memories. A room like the stacks in this library. And to understand the workings of our own heart we have to keep on making new reference cards. We have to dust things off every once in awhile, let in fresh air, change the water in the flower vases. In other words, you’ll live forever in your own private library.” 
- From Kafka on the Shore

(Here’s Murakami on sharing a birthday with Jack London and that strange moment his birthday was announced as a public event on the radio.)

David Mitchell – Jan. 12, 1969

“Books don’t offer real escape, but they can stop a mind scratching itself raw.” 
- From Cloud Atlas

Anne Bronte – Jan. 17, 1820

“The human heart is like india-rubber; a little swells it, but a great deal will not burst it." 
From Agnes Grey

- Intern Malika

Here's How to Livestream the Altuzarra Fall/Winter 2017 Show Today

Credit: Presley Ann/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

We did you a solid and got you access to the digital front row of Altuzarra’s Fall/Winter 2017 collection–you’re welcome. Straight from New York Fashion Week, you can watch the Altuzarra show live (and given last season’s collection of Technicolor gingham and cherry-printed-everything–aka, what Carrie Bradshaw would wear to a picnic date in the park–how could you not tune in?).

RELATED: Alexander Wang and Joseph Altuzarra Wake Us Up to the Fact That Life Is Just a Bowl of Cherries

Make sure to watch the livestream, below, today at 8 p.m. ET.

2

PRUSSIAN BLUE

It started as a mistake, transformed workflow for architects, and revived Japanese print-making.

Created as a result of mixing blood, potash, and iron sulfate while trying to make red cochineal dye, Prussian blue was announced officially in 1710. 

Paper covered with ammonium ferric citrate plunged into potassium ferricyanide turned Prussian blue and preserved the image of objects set on top of the paper in the process. And thus the “cyanotype” was born.

From there, architects found these “blue prints” useful to make copies of one drawing. Sound familiar?

More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art

The Italian Comedians, about 1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Equisetum sylvaticum, 1853, Anna Atkins; and Anne Dixon. J. Paul Getty Museum.