animals-in-history

They abandoned 50,000 hens. We rescued 4,460. Watch.

Five years ago, we undertook the largest rescue of farmed animals in California history, saving the lives of 4,460 hens from a Turlock egg farm that had left 50,000 hens without food for more than two weeks. 

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret filmmaker, Keegan Kuhn, documented the rescue and its aftermath in Turlock, which you can watch above.

washingtonpost.com
His Paula Deen takedown went viral. But this food scholar isn’t done yet.
Michael Twitty’s mission: To evangelize about the African roots of Southern food.

Wow this guy is amazing uhhhhhh uhhhhhh such awesome work

-blogger at Afroculinaria.com

“Twitty is deeply engrossed in both the African American and Jewish food traditions. “Blacks and Jews are the only peoples I know who use food to talk about their past while they eat it,” says Twitty, 38.”

“From Richmond it was a short jaunt to Colonial Williamsburg, where Twitty spent the week lecturing, conducting training sessions and cooking in period costume at three of the living history museum’s venues. In all his talks, Twitty emphasized the impact of chefs and cooks of African descent on shaping American and Southern cuisines in colonial times and after.”

“At a conference he met the scholar Robert Farris Thompson, author of “Flash of the Spirit,” a book about the influence of African religions on African American art that helped him see that “soul food” was, among other things, a spiritual term describing a mystical connection between humans and the animals and plants they eat.”

“He cooked and he gardened. He studied heirloom seed varieties, some that had been brought from Africa and some that had been carried from the New World to Africa and then, on slave ships, back to North America, among them okra, black-eyed peas, kidney and lima beans, Scotch bonnet peppers, peanuts, millet, sorghum, watermelon, yams and sesame. He called those seeds “the repositories of our history” and wrote about them in a monograph published by Landreth Seed in its 2009 catalogue.”

“Twitty’s embrace of all the various parts of himself — African, African American, European, black, white, gay, Jewish — sometimes raises hackles, as does his habit of speaking his mind. An article he wrote in the Guardian on July 4, 2015, suggesting that American barbecue “is as African as it is Native American and European, though enslaved Africans have largely been erased” from its story, elicited scorn and worse: Many commenters were outraged by his idea of barbecue as cultural appropriation.”

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American Museum of Natural History, Part 4: The Birds are Dinosaurs Exhibit, part 1: Chickenparrot Models

I took a lot of photos of the “Dinosaurs Among Us” Exhibit for obvious reasons. Those obvious reasons are:

1. Thank god this exits 
2. I cried. I openly wept when I went through this. And I went through it three times. I openly wept each time. 

Anyways here’s part one: Chickenparrot Models. @bruh-i-nevre-seen-a-cooler-dino

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Снежная королева (The Snow Queen)

69 in x of animated feature film history
Release: 1957
Country: Soviet Union
Director: Lev Atamanov

“The Snow Queen is based on a story of the same name by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, first published in 1844.

The story begins with a little man, who says he is ‘Old Dreamy’ (’Ole Lukøje’), telling the tale of the Snow Queen. He starts with two children, Kay and Gerda, planting roses together.

On a winter night following, Gerda’s grandmother tells the two children the legend of the Snow Queen. The Snow Queen’s proud and frowning face is seen in Gerda’s frosted window to Gerda’s exclamation, ‘It’s the Snow Queen!’ Kay jokes, ‘Let her come in here, and I’ll put her on a hot stove!’ This angers the Snow Queen, who is watching the children from her mirror, which she smashes with her scepter, telling the ice splinters of the shattered mirror to go into the eyes and hearts of those who have offended her. Back at Gerda’s home the window bursts open, letting in ice splinters that get into Kay’s eyes and heart. His personality changes: he is hostile toward Gerda. The next day, Kay ties his sled to the sleigh of the Snow Queen, which has suddenly appeared.

Gerda goes out to look for Kay. She faces many adventures; a sorceress attempts to steal her memories; she painstakingly finds a boy who turns out not to be Kay; she’s captured by thieves; and whisked far to the North to save Kay.

In 1959, the film was dubbed into English and released by Universal Pictures. This version is introduced by a six-minute live-action Christmas prologue featuring TV personality Art Linkletter. The American version also contained an entirely rewritten musical score and had three new songs in English, two of which replaced the Russian songs.

Hayao Miyazaki has stated that this film is one of his inspirations to work in animation. When he started his career, Miyazaki had a rough start and was thinking of leaving animation already. When he saw The Snow Queen, he admired it and continued working in anime. In September 2007, it was announced that Studio Ghibli will be distributing this film through their Ghibli Museum Library label, and it was released in December 2007 (in the original Russian audio with Japanese subtitles).”

(source)

UPDATED 2/18/17: The Snow Queen is available on YouTube, in both its original subtitled version and its American 1959 release.

Mutt was a YMCA cigarette delivery dog during WWI. These dogs delivered cigarettes and even provided psychological comfort, even just for a fleeting moment, to the soldiers out on the field. They were known to boost moral. Mutt was injured twice during WWI. Quite often, mascots such as Mutt were left behind when conflict was over but it is said that Mutt was smuggled on board and returned safely to New York.