angry characters

Caleb McLaughlin WILL get the recognition he DESERVES just like the rest of the Stranger Things crew. He put his time and talent into the show and I️ REFUSE to have people forget about Lucas when mentioning the kids. He’s ’ literally the only black child on set and if that’s not alienating then I️ don’t know what is!!! so the least people can do is show him even half of the love y’all show for the other kids.

So many books and tv shows about werewolves worship this dominance culture, especially a male-centric dominance hierarchy, and sometimes it drives me nuts because it’s regarded as the default. That if humans transformed into beasts, of course most of the survivors would be men, and of course they’d be violent and territorial and murderous, and of course they’d be vaguely chauvinistic because ‘they can’t help it that’s just how werewolves are’.

It’s this idea that the metaphor for a beast as one’s inner nature is reserved for male characters and male violence, tossed in with  frequently-inaccurate anthropomorphic assumptions about animal pack culture.

Where are the stories about the werewolf packs that are mostly female?  Where are the stories about the fact that women who’ve born children have a higher pain tolerance than men and would better survive the bite? Where are the stories about the women who spend so much time controlling their passions and their emotions and their desires to navigate in a man’s world that they adapt all to well to controlling their mystical transformations too?

What does a pack of all female werewolves look like? Is there a hierarchical structure, or something else? Does it mean the same thing to be an alpha, a beta? What does it mean to be a lone wolf?

I want the stories about how men who are bitten are more likely to go mad  from trying to keep a duality in their minds instead of coming to consensus and sharing space with their wolf-spirit. I want stories about the female alpha wolf who only offers the bite to other girls, because dudes have already fucked up ruling the human world, let’s not let them have the supernatural one too.  

I want the story about the trans girl who all of a sudden has to deal with physically transforming her body three nights a month, because hell if you ever wanted a metaphor about not fitting right in your own skin, werewolves are a good option.

I want the story about how the hedge-witches took wolves as familiars and gave them human souls, turned them into human girls, and forced them to give up the wind and the snow and the grass for a life trapped in human flesh.

I want the story about the teenage werewolf girls who hunt down other monsters while they try to find the right shoes for prom and study for their written driver’s test.  And when people joke about them going to the bathroom in a pack, it’s not really a joke. Because girls know a journey is not an adventure unless she brings her friends, and when they travel in packs, they travel in packs.

I want more female werewolves.

  • Kara Danvers: Has two entire episodes dealing with the fact that she has massive issues with barely repressed anger, has an entire rage warehouse ,goes into several highly emotional angry outbursts, literally beats several of her opponents in pure rage,has more material dedicated to her anger then any other hero with the exception of the Hulk, outright states how much she loathes the fact that she isn't allowed to get angry
  • Some Supergirl "fans" : What he hell? Kara was angry at James and Winn? What is this OOC bullshit? Kara doesn't do anger. She is a puppy

bleudinosaur  asked:

Hello! Quick question, do you have any resources/tips for writing hateful/mean dialogue? I'm having more trouble with this than I thought I would. Thanks :D

Hello!  Off the top of my head, I can think of a few: 

1.  Allow conflict to escalate and then explode. 

Unless one of your characters is entering the discussion raging mad about this-that-or-the-other, your dialogue will likely start somewhat placid and escalate from there.  

For example: 

“Um.  Sandy,” said Leon, voice carefully level.  “Can we talk?” 

“Sure!  What about, man?”  said Sandy, smiling pleasantly at his friend. 

“I, um.  Feel silly even asking you this, but uh…”  Leon chuckled awkwardly, then took a deep, steadying breath through his nostrils.  “Did you…have sex with my father?”

Sandy blinked, then let out a nervous bray of laughter.  “Wha-ha-hat ever gave you that idea, bro?” 

Leon’s eyes widened.  “You DID!”

“What?  No I didn’t!”  

“Yes, you did!”  cried Leon, pointing a finger at him.  “You only do that stupid laugh when you’re caught in a lie!  You totally did!  YOU BANGED MY DAD!

Sandy opened his mouth to protest, then closed it in resignation.  “Okay, look.  Daniel and I were both drunk, it was a mistake…” 

“OH MY GOD!”  Leon clapped a hand over his mouth.  “You fucking bastard.  My parents are getting a divorce now!”  

“Look, it isn’t my fault your dad can’t keep it in his fucking pants!”  Sandy snapped.  “And if your mom knew how to please a man, he wouldn’t have had to get his rocks off in me anyway.” 

“Son of a BITCH!”  Without thinking, Leon balled his fist and sent it flying.  

Okay, never mind the subject matter.  See the escalation there?  Though there’s tension at the beginning of the discussion, both characters are calm, which makes it more interesting (and in a weird way, rewarding) when one finally explodes.

Even if one of your characters is entering the discussion angry, there will likely be a period in which their companion tries to placate them before they finally give in and it devolves into a proper, two-sided fight.  

Let’s return to another scenario of Sandy and Leon’s personal drama to see what I mean:  

“SON OF A BITCH!”  roared Leon, storming into his shared dorm room.  “YOU SLEPT WITH MY FUCKING DAD!” 

Sandy, who had been reclined on the sofa reading a book, scrambled into an upright sitting position.  “Wha-ha-hat?  No I didn’t!” 

“Yes you did,” Leon fumed, face tomato red.  “You’re doing that stupid laugh you only do when you’re lying!”

“Look, Lee, I swear -” 

“TELL ME THE FUCKING TRUTH, SANDY.” 

The two stared at each other for a moment, before Sandy ducked his head sheepishly.  “Okay, look, Daniel and I were drunk, it was a mistake -” 

“YOU BASTARD.”

“Lee, I’m sorry-”

“YOU MOTHERFUCKING BASTARD!  MY PARENTS ARE GETTING A DIVORCE NOW!”

“Oh, for God’s sake-YOUR FATHER’S FUCKING GAY, LEON!”  Sandy snapped, rolling his eyes.  “And it’s none of my business, I know, but I really have a hard time picturing that a heterosexual woman, AND A FUCKING GAY MAN, ever had marriage of year!” 

Leon’s face turned an interesting shade of purple.  “Why you LITTLE…” 

“He should have been able to keep it in his pants anyways,” Sandy sneered.  “And if your mom knew how to please a man, he wouldn’t have needed to get his rocks off elsewhere.” 

That was the last straw.  Leon balled his fist and sent it flying.

I’ve been watching altogether too many reality TV shows lately, but you get the point:  conflict, of any sort, escalates until it simmers down or explodes.  

2.  Selectively use synonyms for ‘said.’ 

Contrary to popular belief, said isn’t dead.  However, antonyms can be great mood setters.  

For creating a snappy, hateful, angry mood, try synonyms like this:

Snapped

Barked

Roared

Fumed

Argued

Taunted

Hissed

Cursed

Swore

Challenged

Seethed

Shouted

Snarled

Bellowed

Growled

Sneered 

Just don’t overdo it, or you’ll end up looking like that one scene from My Immortal.  Yeah, you know the one: 

3.  Allow for pointed jabs.  

In arguments, even with loved ones, we sometimes say hurtful things with or without meaning them.  

When one of your characters is angry with the other, and I mean really angry, they may not be above pointing out their insecurities in a heated moment.  

This can be treated as comedic fodder in some instances (i.e. generally anything related to erectile dysfunction and feigned orgasms), but in others, it can get genuinely hurtful and heartbreaking.  

Let’s say you’re dealing with two characters, one of whom has abandonment issues.  Maybe the other knows this, and is generally supportive.  However, in a very heated argument, they may reach for it as a weapon.  

For example:

“For God’s sake, Michael, it’s one o’clock in the morning!”  cried Lisa, as her drunken husband staggered in the door.  “It’s your son’s seventh birthday today!  Did you really think now was the best time to have a guy’s night out with your poker buddies!?”

“Not now, Lise. I wanna sleep,” Michael slurred, dumping his gym bag in the corner and staggering towards the stairs.

“NO,” snapped Lisa, grabbing his shoulder and spinning him to face her.  “No, Mike.  You don’t get to leave without talking about this.”

“Ugh.  Why do you always gotta be like this, Lisa,”  Michael groaned, temples throbbing.  

“Don’t you dare try and play the victim here!  Do you think my afternoon’s been easy?  I had to look at his little face, and tell him his daddy loved vodka more than-”

“DAMMIT, LISA!”  Michael barked suddenly.  “This is why your dad left, you know that!?  You just can’t help but drive men away.”

Lisa recoiled as though she’d been stung.  Michael felt a sick wave of satisfaction deep in his gut that he knew he’d be ashamed of once he was sober. 

“Go to hell, Mike,” whispered Lisa.  Tears pricked her eyes as she turned and hurried out of the room.

Mike’s an asshole, but you get the point.  Also note that this exchange follows the same pattern of escalation I mentioned earlier.

These kinds of jabs can take really any number of forms for anyone with a shared history:  past instances of adultery, poor financial decisions, bad parenting, or mistakes made in adolescence can all become canon fodder in a harsh altercation.  The better the people know each other, the better they’ll know their week spots.  

That’s why folks who don’t know each other all that well will usually settle for jabs at one another’s parentage, sexual histories, et cetera to try to get a rise out of them.

In a very hateful dialogue, usually delivered as hate speech from a bigoted stranger, this could also involve slurs towards the person’s sexuality, race, or gender, or falling back on harmful stereotypes to try and hurt the party in question;  they know that it’s a sore spot for them, and they want to hurt them as much as possible with it.

(It’s worth noting here, however, that if you are White, I would recommend against using racial slurs in your writing, just as if you’re straight you may not want to use words like “dyke” or “f*ggot” out of respect for your readers.  That’s just my opinion, however, and not everyone will agree with me on this one.)


I really hope this helps, and happy writing!  <3 

Y’know an awful lot of Terry Pratchett’s books are concerned with how powerful women are when they get angry and how important anger is as a driving force to defend what is right and to tackle injustice. 

A lot of his most interesting and most deeply moral characters are angry ones. Granny Weatherwax, Sam Vimes, Tiffany Aching. All are to a large extent driven to do good by anger.

And that honestly means a lot to me.

I had the honor and horror of explaining/proving today to my local comic book store owner, who is a born-and-raised Jewish dude, that the Black Widow is Jewish. I ended up making a drive home and grabbing my copy of the 83-87 run of her origin story and then going back in person to prove the point today (a week after the original argument)/sit there and watch him repeat, dumbfounded, again and again, “I thought she was Russian Orthodox or something.”

So then I had to explain that Marvel eventually retconned her into having had the Red Room rip out all her memories of life before her parents’ death and thus left her unaware of her heritage. He had a copy of the new version of her origin story. We went over it together in-store, curious, and left mutually disappointed. There’s not one hint of her original origin left other than her very Jewish patronymic still remaining part of her name.

As a Russian-descended person I find that kind of a fitting metaphor for how the Russian government has treated Russian Jews - Natasha can succeed, can be the best in her field, can be beautiful and praised for her moral fortitude, but only if she has all Jewishness forcibly removed from her. It’s sort of befitting the era in which her character would have grown up, especially if Marvel pushes forward with the idea they’ve hinted at that the Red Room’s treatments have stalled her aging and she might be nearly as old as Steve and Bucky.

Out of universe, though, please never forget that Marvel took out all the women from the Avengers except one for their cinematic adaptation initially, and the one they left, they made either atheist or secular enough to casually refer to Loki and Thor as gods. They had a chance to put the first Jewish superhero to the big screen and didn’t even consider it for a second.

Then they made the Scarlet Witch not only not Jewish but Christian in the sequel. Just to twist the knife a little deeper, they made her non-Rromani and went with a fake nationality to top it all off.

And thus I stood before a man whose job was (in part) to live and breathe Marvel and he had no idea Natasha Romanov was Jewish. This new and improved origin story that has no trace of her Jewish roots (in freaking Novosibirsk where there’s a large Jewish quarter of the city, are you kidding me with this Marvel) comes during the same year Marvel published a storyline headed by writer Nick Spencer where Captain America was a Nazi/HYDRA agent all along, a storyline that only got canceled because the fan protests and outcry was so great that between the petitions, boycotts and actual Marvel actors like Clark Gregg (who is Jewish and who Nick Spencer sent the issue personally) publicly stating disgust with it that Marvel realized they weren’t going to be able to sell overt antisemitism. Covert antisemitism, though, we’re still buying - the Iron Man anti-villain/anti-heroine The Mad Thinker/Rhona Clytemnestra Cohen had her surname changed to have always been Burchill and her backstory retconned into her family being the victims of ‘a criminal car bombing’. Not ‘an antisemitic car bombing motivated by the fact my mother was a brilliant Jewish scientist whose coworkers had it out for her’. Just ‘a criminal car bombing’. I have seen all of three people complain about that even though it takes her motivations as a Jewish woman who hates that superheroes don’t save or stand for people like her and turns her into another generic supervillain.

I see what you’re doing, Marvel. There’s a reason I go out of my way to buy my comics from a place that will let me leaf through comics before purchasing them. If you want to keep going down this path, please just be aware that one day, kids will be shown that Captain America panel of him saying ‘Hail HYDRA’ in history class as they learn about the 2016 antisemitic upswing. You are made of the same stuff videos labeled ‘crazy propaganda cartoons’ on YouTube are.

(And yes I know one person’s rants are another person’s no big deal but I am not merely out of fucks to give, I am deeply, deeply in the red right now.)

OC asks
  1. What is your OC’s favorite color?
  2. Does your OC collect anything? What do they collect?
  3. What kind of things is your OC allergic to?
  4. What kind of clothing does your OC wear?
  5. What is your OC’s first memory?
  6. WWhat’s your OC’s favorite animal? Least favorite?
  7. What element would your OC be?
  8. What is your OC’s theme song? 
  9. Do you have a faceclaim / voiceclaim for your OC?
  10. What deadly sin would best represent your OC?
  11. What are your OC’s hobbies?
  12. How patient is your OC? How hot-headed are they?
  13. What is your OC’s gender / sexuality / race / species / etc.?
  14. What foods does your OC like to eat? What are their least favorite foods?
  15. If your OC could have any pet, what would they choose? Why?
  16. What does your OC smell like? 
  17. How do they make a living? What kind of job do they want / not want? What is their dream job? What do they think of their current job?
  18. What are your OC’s greatest fears? Weaknesses? Strengths?
  19. What kind of music do they listen to? Do they have a favorite song?
  20. If they came from their world to ours (if not already in our’s) how would they react? What would they do?
  21. What personal problems/issues do they have? Pet peeves?
  22. What kind of student were they/would they be in high school?
  23. What is a random fact about your OC? 
  24. What is their outlook on life? What is their philosophy / what do they think in general about living?
  25. What inspired you to create them / how did you create them? Were they originally a fancharacter? What was their personality / design like when you first made them?
  26. Who is the most important person in their life? Why? Who is the least important to them (that still has an impact and why?
  27. What kind of childhood did your character have?
  28. What kind of nervous habits do they have? Do they stim? Do they have any kinds of addictions?
  29. If they could choose their epitaph for their grave, what would they choose?
  30. Do they want to get married? Why or why not? Would they ever want kids? Do they have kids? Why?
  31. What is their most traumatic memory/experience? What is their favorite memory?
  32. If they could have one thing in the world, what would it be?
  33. Would they ever kill someone? What would someone have to do to push them to kill someone? If they would kill someone, why? 
  34. What social groups and activities does your character attend? What role do they like to play? What role do they actually play, usually?
  35. How is your character’s imagination? Daydreaming a lot? Worried most of the time? Living in memories?
  36. What does your character want most? What do they need really badly, compulsively? What are they willing to do, to sacrifice, to obtain?
  37. What’s something that your character does, that other people don’t normally do?
  38. What would your character do with a million dollars? 
  39. What is in your characters refrigerator right now? On their bedroom floor? Nightstand? Garbage can?
  40. Your character is getting ready for a night out. Where are they going? What do they wear? Who will they be with?
  41. What does your character do when they’re angry? Why?
  42. Does your character have any scars? Where did they get them from? 
  43. What was the most offensive thing your character had ever said?
  44. How does your character react/ accept criticism?
  45. If your character was given a slice of pineapple pizza and they HAD to eat it (or something bad would happen), how would they react? Do they even LIKE pineapple pizza?
  46. Your character is given a voodoo doll of themself. What do they do with it? Do they see if it actually works?
  47. Can your character draw? What do they like to draw? Do they doodle?
  48. What were their parents like? How has that affected how they are as an adult?
  49. Does your character like candy? Do they get sugar rushes? What are they like when they get a rush?
  50. If your character was presented with imminent and unavoidable death/fatality, how would they react? Would they try to avoid death anyways? Would they try to make their last days count? 
  • Two male characters: *constantly angry at each other, insulting one another, only sometimes working together as part of a team*
  • Tumblr: thats it!!!! they must be gay!! definitely 100% pure gay canon gay¡¡!! they! are! gay!
  • Show writers: Um actually that's not--
  • Tumblr: So the creators are queerbaiting by making us think these two characters would be together and here's an entire dissertation about how they should be ashamed.

the thing about Bakugou is that, in the limits that his personality allows, he’s soft for Kirishima - he calls him by name, listens to him and always answers him, tries to help him out as best as he can, accepts his help when Kirishima offers it, actively works to make him feel better when he’s down, never yells at him unless it’s an answer to Kirishima’s teasing, has no problems in complimenting him and pointing out his strength, he’s soft for Kirishima

he openly considers him a friend and treats him as such, he cares and doesn’t really try to hide it, though his inexperience in showing that sort of feelings does make him come off as awkward now and again 

I guess what I mean to say is it’d be nice if the fandom could remember that, instead of writing him as angry and prickly and downright offensive and uncaring when dealing with what has been recognized by the canon as his best friend and someone he does enjoy the company of over and over again

I don’t think anyone will fully understand how much I want Tim to be unapologetically angry at everyone when he comes back.

2

I’ve learned that our choices always matter to someone, somewhere. And sooner or later, in ways we can’t always fathom, the consequences come back to us. I came from Serkonos to Dunwall as a boy, made my living as a killer; one of the few who’ve heard the Outsider’s voice. I murdered an Empress, but saved her daughter, who will one day rule the Empire. Those were my choices… I’m ready for what comes.