angolan women

Queen Nzinga Mbande (1583-1663), sometimes referred to as Anna Nzinga, was ruler of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in what is now Angola.

As the favoured daughter of King Kiluanji of the Ndongo, Nzinga Mbande was brought up witnessing her father’s governance of the kingdom first-hand. He even took her with him when he went to war. Kiluanji made deals with the Portuguese who were expanding their slave trading operations in South West Africa, and this relationship was maintained when her brother Ngola Hari became king. However in 1617 the Portuguese Governor Correia de Sousa launched attacks against the Ndongo kingdom that captured thousands of Mbundu people.

In 1621 when the Portuguese invited the Ndongo king to take part in peace talks, he sent his sister Nzinga Mbande in his place. At her famous first meeting with De Sousa chairs were only provided for the Portuguese, and Mbande was expected to sit on the floor. Instead she commanded one of her servants to go down on all fours and act as her chair. During the negotiations Mbande walked a fine line between preventing the Portuguese from controlling the kingdom as they had done in Kongo, while keeping options open to trade for firearms to strengthen her armies. In this she was successful, although as a condition of the agreement she had to convert to Christianity and was baptised as Anna de Sousa, with the Governor becoming her Godfather.

In 1626 Mbande became Queen of the Ndongo following the death of her brother. Her reign began in peril as the Portuguese went back on their deal with her and declared war, as did other neighbouring tribes. Forced into retreat from her own lands, Mbande led her people south to the kingdom of Matamba, which she attacked, capturing Matamba’s Queen and routing her army. Mbande then installed herself as the new ruler of Matamba, from where she launched a prolonged campaign of guerrilla warfare against the Portuguese which would last for the next 30 years.

Mbande developed a legendary reputation as a warrior, although claims that that she took part in human sacrifice are likely the result of European propaganda and gossip. Accounts that she maintained a personal harem of more than 50 men are also unproven. What is known is that Mbande assembling a diverse army to oppose the Portuguese that included runaway slaves, defecting soldiers, and women. Exploiting European rivalries she made an alliance with the Dutch, which included acquiring her own personal bodyguard of 60 Dutch elite soldiers armed with rifles. Working with the Dutch, Mbande successfully defeated Portuguese armies in 1644, 1646, and 1647. However the Dutch were eventually pushed out of the region in 1648 and Mbanda was forced to carry on the fight alone. While she was never able to completely defeat them, she successfully resisted Portuguese invasion for decades.

Mbande continued personally leading her troops into battle until she was in her sixties, but the long war eventually wore both sides down. In 1657 she finally signed a peace treaty with Portugal. She then spent the rest of her life focused on rebuilding a nation which had been devastated by conflict and over-farming. She died of natural causes in 1663, aged 81. Today Nzinga Mbande is a symbol of Angolan independence, memorialised by numerous statues.

Himba People - Namibia

The Himba people are the indigenous people of Northern Namibia, also residing in parts of Angola, particularly along the Kunene River. They are a semi-nomadic and pastoral community. Himba women take on many roles in their community, everything from creating handicrafts and minding children, to building homes from mud bricks. 

In the Himba community, hairstyle is used to symbolise social status. Men often have a single plait that extends towards the rear of their head. Women have vertical plaits. Variations of these styles can denote details such as whether a tribe member is married. 

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When I was watching "Life in a Day", this song, sung by African women, played through some of the scenes. And while it was on, I was so completely enthralled I couldn’t even blink. To me this sounds so beautiful, and to see the actual video on during this was even more beautiful. Their voices together in harmony is wonderful and I think I could fall asleep to this every night.

Beyond the song, I highly recommend that everyone watches “Life in a Day.” It’s so well put together and follows the lives of some interesting people. This documentary makes me want more than ever to experience all that life has to offer. I’m seriously thinking about taking a break from school after this year, and volunteering and traveling to all the wonderful corners of the earth, to learn about myself as well as cultures all over. I just want to do these things while I’m young, I don’t want to wait until I’m retired when my life is boring and old.

Anyway, watch “Life in a Day,” it will make you smile and will make you realize how big and wonderful the world can be.

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Life in a Day Soundtrack - Angolan Women

This was by far my favorite song from the entire movie.