andrea lennon

Sophie d’Hoore autumn—winter 1999-00.

Passionately interested in the structure of clothing, d’Hoore became engrossed in the craft of dressmaking, rediscovering and reworking classical shapes in a style that was entirely her own. Her patterns are clear and put together logically, always aiming for flexibility. She plays with contrasts between male and female forms, such as jogging trousers in taffeta and an evening dress in heavy poplin. She chooses the most beautiful materials, in maginificent wools, cottons, cashmeres and silks. 

For the realisation of her designs she demands first-class tailoring, beautifully finished. The use of haute couture techniques such as ‘double face’ make her coats look as beautiful on the inside as they do on the outside. 

Each season she extends her basic colours to provide a distinctive palette. For Winter 1999 white is accompanied by black, grey, beige and navy blue with red, fuchsia and orange. 

Her collections are put together ingeniously. Each collection is a coherent whole of vests, trousers, skirts, suits, and coats. Even when combined with one another, the ensembles always look as if they were designed as a single silhouette. 

D’Hoore has a contemporary feel for combining luxury with comfort, city clothes with sportswear. She succeeds in showing that luxury can be very simple and simplicity very luxurious. 

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George Harrison, Top Ten, Hamburg, 1961, photographed by Jürgen Vollmer; Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison in Paris,  15 January 1964, photo via CBS.

The following is translated from Jürgen’s book, published in Germany in 2013:

“[In 1964] George had called me. The Beatles and their entourage were residing in the elegant George V. Just the thought of George’s idea of going to meet them at the hotel and then accompanying them to the Olympia made me feel uneasy. Instead, I had suggested meeting them at the theater, hoping that my inhibitions wouldn’t be noticed amid the general hustle and bustle there.

Okay, sensitive George had said, he would give the necessary instructions so that I would be let through to their dressing room from the stage door.

In front of the Olympia and on the side streets, I was greeted by a sight I had never encountered before, of hundreds of loud girls and boys who were apparently trying to catch a glimpse of their idols even though they did not have tickets, while repeatedly screaming out the names of the four Beatles.

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Sophie d’Hoore autumn—winter 1999-00.

Passionately interested in the structure of clothing, d’Hoore became engrossed in the craft of dressmaking, rediscovering and reworking classical shapes in a style that was entirely her own. Her patterns are clear and put together logically, always aiming for flexibility. She plays with contrasts between male and female forms, such as jogging trousers in taffeta and an evening dress in heavy poplin. She chooses the most beautiful materials, in maginificent wools, cottons, cashmeres and silks. 

For the realisation of her designs she demands first-class tailoring, beautifully finished. The use of haute couture techniques such as ‘double face’ make her coats look as beautiful on the inside as they do on the outside. 

Each season she extends her basic colours to provide a distinctive palette. For Winter 1999 white is accompanied by black, grey, beige and navy blue with red, fuchsia and orange. 

Her collections are put together ingeniously. Each collection is a coherent whole of vests, trousers, skirts, suits, and coats. Even when combined with one another, the ensembles always look as if they were designed as a single silhouette. 

D’Hoore has a contemporary feel for combining luxury with comfort, city clothes with sportswear. She succeeds in showing that luxury can be very simple and simplicity very luxurious. 

2

George Harrison at The Beatles’ Hamburg press conference and on stage at the Ernst-Merck-Halle, 26 June 1966

Photos: K&K Ulf Krüger OHG/Getty Images

“Hours before the concert was due to begin we stood in front of the entrance to take our seats in row 5, not the allotted row 17. In my hands I held a colorful bouquet of flowers which I had intended for my idol, Paul McCartney, but which landed in front of George Harrison. Eye contact: George smiled at me. I was overwhelmed! Row 5, seat 22 belonged to a young man who was willing to trade seats with me. [My friend] Heike sat behind me. I couldn’t believe it: Paul, John, George and Ringo were standing on stage in the flesh, and overcome, I bit the arm of the person in the seat next to me.” - Birgit Pasternak, fan at the Hamburg concert, Hamburger Abendblatt, 31 May 2006

Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney and John Lennon pictured on the flight from London to Munich, 23 August 1966; and George Harrison pictured during the “Strawberry Fields Forever” promotional video shoot, Knole Park, Sevenoaks, Kent, 31 January 1967 [x].

Photos: Robert Whitaker; Jane Bown

The story behind those hats:

On the flight to Munich, BRAVO journalist Thomas G. Beyl gave The Beatles presents - “four original, Bavarian traditional costume hats,” as a “welcoming present” from the editorial office, based in Munich. This was reported by BRAVO in its 11 July 1966 issue.
It looks as though George’s hat made an appearance some months later during the “Strawberry Fields Forever” shoot.

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A rare photo of George Harrison, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr with others on the train in Mulheim-Styrum, Germany, 25 June 1966, submitted to the German newspaper WAZ by Juliane Grote. Photo 1 courtesy of Juliane Grote, 2012; photo 2 courtesy of DB Museum, 2016.

The following memory, by fan Juliane, is translated from WAZ’s 25 June 2012 issue:

“In 1963, The Beatles sang their way into my young girl’s heart with ‘She Loves You.’ When The Beatles were due to come to Essen during a Blitzournee, it all came down to one question for me: how do I get there? My parents categorically declined it. My father, an officer with the railway police, spoke of ‘layabouts’ and ‘long-haired men’ and remained steadfast. Only to then surprise me with confidential information. After making me promise not to breathe a word to anyone, he told me that he was one of the officers on duty at the trainstation where The Beatles would arrive and said I may be able to experience the arrival of the train.

The day before, we found out that my school friend Rita could also come along; the destination of our dreams: Mühlheim-Styrum. My God, I was excited when we arrived there on 25 June 1966. There was nothing going on, there were barely any barriers set up. Were we to have The Beatles to ourselves?

When the chartered train arrived, I felt queasy. I’m not about to faint, I thought to myself. My father gave me the signal we had agreed upon, telling me what compartment The Beatles were in. I climbed aboard - and stood in front of The Beatles. My heart was racing and I couldn’t get a word out. All I could do was hold out my autograph book and a pen and silently ask them for their autographs. What a moment!

The moment ended abruptly when a police officer manouevered me out of the train. When John, Paul, George and Ringo departed the train, the only people on the track were photographers and the two of us girls. Right in front of the stairs the line of policemen ended. Our chance. No one stopped us as we lined up with The Beatles. We walked, no, floated, down the stairs next to them.

The concert at the Gruga [Hall] wasn’t important any longer, we couldn’t get closer to The Beatles than that.” - Juliane Grote, WAZ, 25 June 2012

The Beatles, Munich, Germany, 23 June 1966, photographed by Elmar Welge.

Photo © Elmar Welge

“Without the music of The Beatles, this world would just be black and white.” - Elmar Welge in a radio interview with WDR4, 22 June 2016

Klaus Voormann with the The Beatles’ Revolver cover and his first Grammy, 1960′s.

Photo © Klaus Voormann

The following excerpt contains Klaus Voormann’s recollections of designing the iconic cover, and was translated from his book, Warum spielst du Imagine nicht auf dem weißen Klavier, John?

(Hopefully, my translation is able to bring across his wonderful memories. It’s rather lengthy, just to let you know in advance!)

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