andamane

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

Meet Rajan the elephant, who spent decades of his life laboring for a logging company on mainland India before he was rescued in 2008. Now in his mid-60s, Rajan lives at Havelock Island in India’s Andaman Islands, where he has spent many his of days swimming with tourists. If you visit now, though, you’ll find Rajan has completely retired; he no longer swims but will accept baths and walks from fans. This image is part of Offset (@offsetimages), a curated collection of commercial and editorial photography and illustration from award-winning artists around the world. Photographers who wish to join the Offset artist community are welcome to apply at the link in our bio. // #elephant #offsetimages #sp #India #andamanislands #havelockisland http://ift.tt/2a9qd9I

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Andaman honeymoons is a leading tour operator in andaman and nicobar islands .we specialize in organizing honeymoon tour packages for couples.our services include stay at the most romantic hotels and resorts in the andaman islands,private transport and water sports activity.

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

“An unknown hominin species that bred with early human ancestors when they migrated from Africa to Australasia has been identified through genome mapping of living humans.

The genome analysis also questions previous findings that modern humans populated Asia in two waves from their origin in Africa, finding instead a common origin for all populations in the Asia-Pacific region, dating back to a single out-of-Africa migration event.

…When Jaume Bertranpetit at Pompeu Fabra University in Spain and his colleagues analysed the genomes of living Indigenous Australians, Papuans, people from the Andaman Islands near India, and from mainland India, they found sections of DNA that did not match any previously identified hominin species.

These DNA sequences are not present in the genomes of living Europeans or east Asians, suggesting that the ancestors of these people met and bred with a mystery hominin in south Asia or the Pacific region, who left their genetic legacy in the area’s present-day populations.

The unidentified hominin may be Homo erectus or “upright man”, says Bertranpetit. H. erectus is believed to be the first hominin with a similar stature to today’s humans, and the first to leave Africa…”

Source: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2098566-mystery-ancient-human-ancestor-found-in-australasian-family-tree/