and-not-only-did-he-in-season-one

anonymous asked:

You talked about Will and Hannibal's sex scene in S2 and basically how it was an indication that Will really wanted to fuck Hannibal? Not saying that I disagree with you (and now thinking about it you're right) but initially I thought that a) Will was fantasizing about Alana b) it was a throwback to Will's empathy and an indication as to how he and Hannibal were blurring. How do we know for sure that neither a/b were accurate? And do you think that the way it was shot -

I don’t think I said that specifically, but correct in essentials. I believe the scene exposed a lot regarding Will’s feelings for Hannibal. 

I don’t believe Will was fantasizing solely about Alana, no. That isn’t the point of the scene. He never harboured any romantic feelings for Alana. He only thought he did back in season one because he needed something to ground him whilst his brain turned against him. This was confirmed by Hugh Dancy in the Art and Making of Hannibal.

First off, the cinematography throughout that scene is incredibly dubious and very telling. For instance, we see Margot undressing Will whilst Hannibal undresses Alana. These shots fade into each other, sometimes focusing solely on hands so it is entirely unambiguous what’s trying to be conveyed.

See what I mean?

Secondly, Hannibal and Will’s positioning throughout the scene mirror each other. 

Hannibal topping and Will bottoming? Bless this show for foreshadowing Will and Hannibal’s sexual dynamic when they finally do bang. 

Thirdly, Will only starts to come when he sees the Wendigo. Like. Seriously.

See what I mean? And the fact that the Wendigo is basically an anthropomorphic (ish) representation of Will’s inner conflict regarding his feelings for Hannibal.

And lastly, this.

Climaxing one directly after the other, Hannibal looking like he’s taking Will from behind. A beautiful culmination of an entirely dubious scene.

Going back to your question, there is no way of confirming whether a or b are correct. The scene is entirely subjective. There is so much you can glean and interpret from it.