and-michelle-grabner

Authorship has become very slippery, and the ownership of ideas has become less interesting today than the rapid sharing of them.
—  Michelle Grabner, one of the three curators of the 2014 Biennial, in The New York Times profile of HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN, a global collective whose work will be on view in the exhibition.
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Hello The Art Assignment it’s Aubrey submitting for the Paper Weaving project.

When I first watched the video I was intrigued how Michelle Grabner explained one of the motivations for her project was her interest in the order of information and the role it plays. She also mentions how simple repetitive tasks like this are a state between meditative and boring.

I wanted to take these ideas and modify them for myself. The second image shows my paper before I weaved it. I found myself drawing pen markings like these in my sketchbook when I was anxious. It helped alleviate my anxiety a bit for since it was a simple repetitive task as Michelle talked about, and it was almost meditative. I started drawing these markings for this project and as I did  I realized they reminded me of images of our brain neurons. I thought it was fitting since these neurons are black with anxiety. 

Anxiety is an irrational mess and can be overwhelming. However, with paper weaving project I got to destroy the anxiety by cutting the paper into strips and put them in order. Much like how in life one has to consciously work to destroy anxiety and make a better head space for themselves. 

Anyway, this was a long way of saying I really enjoyed this project. I have a few other ideas I might attempt for it as well for fun.

What most informs my curating are conversations with living artists, trying to find secret histories that haven’t been properly acknowledged, and travel—getting out of my comfort zone to find new places and new conversations.
—  Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 Biennial. In the first installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms share their thoughts on curating the Museum's signature exhibition.
With film, it’s hard to locate the artwork: Is it the projected image? The projection beam? The room in which it’s being projected? It’s a constellation of things rather than a singular object. I think that’s a metaphor for how a lot of artists working in a broad range of media function now.
—  Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 Biennial. In the second installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms discuss their curatorial approaches as each organizes a floor of the exhibition.