and why does the preview on the customize page not work

Installing themes on Tumblr is pretty straightforward. You look for a theme that suits your taste, you copy the code, you paste the code, and voila! Cool page for you!

BUT have you ever experienced installing a theme and then, when you view your page, there are some things that look off? Have you experienced installing a theme and then, your page doesn’t look like how it does in the theme preview? Like the colors are different (this could end up into an awful combination of colors) or sometimes the images from your previous theme are stuck when you switch themes (and they could go as far as being positioned in awkward places).

This is a terrible problem for people who are rather sensitive when it comes to their themes or for times when you found the perfect theme but it went wrong on your page. Here’s a simple fix for you, then.

Do this before you paste your codes in the customization panel.

  1. Scroll a bit futher down your existing theme codes and look for the set of lines that start with <meta name=“. You can search the codes (Ctrl+F for Windows; Cmd+F for Mac) but they are usually on the upper part of the codes and easy to see.
  2. Delete them. Every line that starts with <meta name=“. Every single one of them. ALL of them. Delete.
  3. Click Update Preview. Then click Save. Note: There will be no visible changes in your theme once you do this. But it does something. If you’re interested in coding, you can read the explanation I’ll give below the cut.
  4. You can now proceed to deleting the rest of the codes and pasting the ones for the new theme you are installing.

Keep reading

How Disrespect Drove One Artist to Leave Tumblr (Important, Please Read & Spread This)

One challenge of being an artist is managing how and where your artwork can be shared. Most often, artists will give permission to share their art if they are politely asked. 

However, when they discover that their art has been reposted without their permission, problems can quickly pop up. One such case is this artist below, who was notified that someone reposted one of her works, and went to contact the one responsible, not only to be rejected but also treated so badly that they decided to delete all their art and actually leave Tumblr for good.

The artwork that was asked to be taken down is posted below. 

At first glance it seems like a direct link to the artist’s twitter, but the thumbnail image is fairly large. Upon downloading it from the proxy site, it was 506x731, large enough for it to be reposted and further redistributed. 

Above is the response that the artist received when they asked the individual to remove their content. Even though the person made it sound like they would delete it, they in fact did not.

It doesn’t stop there. The individual then created a video, and told the artist to watch it to learn how links worked. So not only did they not listen to the artist to have the link to their OWN WORK removed, they also treated them as if they knew little to nothing. 

Not having any rights to control how their own work is shared, and being made to feel bad over bringing it up with the site owner, imagine how the artist felt when they scrolled down and saw this message unmistakably directed at them, even though it opens with plural ‘artists’:

Likely demoralized over the refusal to have their artwork link removed, and their mind reeling after reading the person’s rude message directed at them, the artist wrote their thoughts down, shortly before they deleted everything on their tumblr:

((For this part, I sought the assistance of some individuals who were fluent in Korean. With their help, we were able to make a direct translation of the artist’s last messages)):

As one can see, they were clearly upset. From reading their last few words, it seems that part of the conversation between the two parties that were submitted to me are missing, as it seems that there were further accusations from the site owner. 

I asked one of the native translators if they could describe the overall feeling expressed in those words, and here is what they told me:

Keep in mind that repost or link, it matters not when an artist asks for their work to be removed. They made it, they own it. 

Below is another message written soon after: 

The proxy site owner told the artist that if they didn’t want their artworks to be shared, then they ought to either publish them on a private blog, or to change the settings of the artist’s blog so that no public sharing links are visible. There are two errors with this argument. The first one is telling an artist they should set their works to private. How then, are people (respectful people) supposed to find the artist’s work, if none of their work can be seen, either through a recommendation from the artist’s host site, or through the site’s own image search? 

Secondly, how is the artist supposed to meet other people who also share their desire and interest for what they draw? Neither of those points take into consideration of the artist’s feelings on the matter. Besides, telling an artist what they should or should not do counts as overstepping boundaries. Artists do not draw for people. They draw because it’s their passion and they want to share that with others. They should not have to go out of their way or change their routine just because there are people who refuse to be decent and respectful.

The argument that artists should change the setting of their blog so that public sharing options are not visible is also inconsiderate. Is it the artist’s fault that the site they use does not carry the option to customize how their art is shared? DeviantArt is the only one that gives the power to control whether or not sharing through the site is allowed or not (artists may disable the share options). However, sites like Tumblr, Twitter, and Pixiv do not have that option, unless the artist sets their entire account to private, which brings back the first point I made. 

It puts a lid over the artist’s personal freedom and they will get virtually no feedback of any sort if no one can see their work because everything is set to private.

The ‘public link’ displays the artwork in nearly full dimension (instead of a small-sized thumbnail image preview like the ones that Google uses). If the artist allows public linking through thumbnail, then one ought to make sure that the thumbnail is small enough that potential viewers would have to visit the artist’s own site to enjoy the artwork. The artist is the one who deserves the credit, feedback, and number of page views. They are the ones who poured hours of work and time, and the ones who strained their wrists, hands, and eyes to create the picture.

Though there is a link to the direct source, how is there a reliable way to know that people are treating it more as a link rather than an image, if the large thumbnail size nullifies the purpose of redirecting the viewer to the artist’s own page? Put simply, why would I, the viewer, care about seeing how the artwork looks from the artist’s own site, since I can already see everything fully on the proxy site that I follow/visit?

This, combined with the fact that the full thumbnail was completely downloadable if one right click ‘save image as’, makes the link post behave almost the same as a repost that is linked directly to the art. 

None of this would have been an issue however, if the artist was asked for permission. They also wrote ‘Do not repost without permission’ on their blog. But aside from not being asked first, their request was met with refusal. They were patronized and accused falsely of ‘owning the internet’ over simply wanting to control how their artwork was shared. They were directed to watch a short video demonstration:

…which likely felt insulting, considering that the artist can understand English well enough to communicate with this person.

It’s not unusual for artists to abandon their tumblr when enough is enough. What is particular with this scenario is that it is not the repost-like link itself that deeply hurt the artist, nor were they hurt that they were not asked first ‒ more than likely, it was the rude manner in which they were treated and dismissed.  

It is impossible to control every single artwork that is published on the web, however people ought to listen when the artist contacts them personally and requests that their work not be used. With this case, the artist’s feelings were brushed aside, their rights were completely ignored, and their polite request dismissed without any consideration

And so, the artist likely thought that it would be less stressful if they shared their artwork on a site where they have better control. If they weren’t respected where they are, they may have felt that taking their hobby somewhere else would be better. Not long after those messages, all work was deleted. 

What had happened was one of the points in my post about What Art Theft Does to an Artist. Even though the proxy site owner did not claim the work as their own, they acted as if they did.

This is the first time I’ve seen an artist leave a fandom because of something like this. 

If doesn’t matter what the excuse is. When the creator of a work, whether it be an artist/writer/translator/scanner/editor makes a request to have something that belongs to them removed, regardless of whether it’s a full repost or a link, whether they gave permission to you previously or not ―

You Remove It. 

Simple as that. 

And before it is brought up: artists and such creators do not go running around asking people to take down their work for no reason. When they do it, it’s because they are not okay with how you shared it. Nor do they spend their time looking up who reposted their artwork; they are reported these things, and that is how they know. 

It baffles me where do some people get the gall to treat what they never made themselves, what they don’t even understand the process of making, like it belongs to them in any way. Artists are not machines that regularly dispense pretty pictures for you every few days for you to take and make your blog/site more attractive/interesting to people. 

They have lives too, and they feel deep pain and depression over things like this. They even feel anxiety before they publish their work, because they know there’s always a risk that comes with what they do. But they still do it because they love drawing, and they love to share it with friends.

So why don’t they have the right to control their work? Why are there some who are so engrossed in their narcissism that their own website takes precedence over the artist’s own feelings and welfare? 

As a community that seeks to protect artists, we need to be more educated about this issue. 

Therefore, once you read this, please reblog and spread this as much as you can. 

If you have a favorite artist or few whom you follow on Tumblr, think about how you would feel if something like this happened to them.