and university of california berkeley

2

Hackers just helped NASA save a treasure trove of climate data from an uncertain future

  • Roughly 200 programmers congregated Saturday in the Doe Library at the University of California, Berkeley, to take part in a hackathon focusing on NASA’s earth sciences programs and the Department of Energy.
  • Wired reported the group of coders had the common goal of saving data that could be deleted or otherwise tucked away under Trump.
  • Using web-crawler scripts and patching together data sets, the hackers were able to successfully preserve 8,404 web pages onto the Internet Archive — a digital library with a plethora of screenshots from websites — and download 25GB of data from 101 public datasets. Read more (2/14/17 3:06 PM)

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slate.com
Berkeley Protests Cancel Professional Bigot Milo Yiannopoulos Campus Appearance
A speech by right wing, all around bigot Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley Wednesday was cancelled after a large protest brok ...

Elliot Hannon at Slate

A speech by right wing, all around bigot Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California, Berkeley Wednesday was cancelled after a large protest broke out on campus. Some protesters broke windows, appeared to throw rocks at police, and lit firecrackers that resulted in a fire in Sproul Plaza near the student union.

The university cancelled the talk by the Breitbart professional provocateur who has carved out a niche among the racist, misogynist right. Yiannopoulos’ general world view and noxious behavior was enough to get him banned from Twitter, buuuuut since there’s a market for mind-bending racism in America these days, he also managed to net a $250,000 book deal from Simon & Schuster. Yiannopoulos’ college talks are usually the subject of outrage and protests. At a recent, similar talk at the Univ. of Washington a man was shot in the melee surround Yiannopoulos’ appearance.

On the Berkeley campus, police appeared to engage with some of the hundreds of protesters armed with homemade shields and ordered the protesters to disperse.


6

Last stop on Milo Yiannopoulos’ speaking tour canceled by protesters

  • School officials canceled the final stop Milo Yiannopoulos’ speaking tour at the University of California, Berkeley, on Wednesday evening after protesters made it impossible for the event to continue.
  • Student activists and anti-fascist demonstrators shot fireworks at the building where Yiannopoulos was scheduled to appear.
  • Others threw smoke bombs and some damaged property. Some appear to have lit a fire on the campus’ Sprout Plaza.
  • UCLA also canceled his scheduled appearance for Thursday.
  • Trump sounded off on the protests Thursday morning, threatening to withdraw federal funding from the public university. Read more

Thressa Stadtman (1920-2016) was a biochemist who made many important discoveries throughout her career, particularly that of the amino acid selenocysteine. She also conducted significant research in the biochemistry of microbes and amino acid metabolism.

She graduated with a PhD in Microbial Biochemisty from the University of California, Berkeley in 1949. She went on to work for the National Heart Institute, and conducted her own biochemistry lab, where she researched selenproteins and bioenergetics. She was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1981.

huffingtonpost.com
Donald Trump Defends Far-Right Troll Milo Yiannopoulos
Yiannopoulos had been scheduled to speak at the University of California, Berkeley, but the event was called off.

Fuck you, trump, and fuck you, Yiannopoulos.  Hate speech and free speech cannot be considered synonymous when the balance of power is so misaligned.  

As a Berkeley alumni, I am very proud of my fellow Golden Bears for standing up to this racist, sexist troll.  His disgusting views have no place in the hallowed halls of Berkeley and the days of white supremacy hiding behind the banner of free speech are over.   

nature.com
Geneticist launches bid for US Senate
Michael Eisen hopes a victory in 2018 will bring a new scientific voice to the US legislature.

In the week since President Donald Trump took the oath of office, scientists have taken to social media en masse, decrying the new administration’s plan to dismantle climate regulations, reports that the administration has censored government scientists’ speech and the coining of the term “alternative facts.”

But Michael Eisen, a geneticist at the University of California, Berkeley, thinks that the situation requires more drastic action. So on 25 January, he announced on Twitter that he will run for US Senate in 2018.

Eisen, who is best known as an advocate for free access to scientific publications and as co-founder of the Public Library of Science (PLoS) journals, may have a viable path to elected office. Dianne Feinstein, the 83-year-old senator from his state, California, has indicated that she might not run for re-election in 2018.

Nature caught up with Eisen to ask him about his plans. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Continue Reading.

Athlete: Allison Stokke
School: University of California, Berkeley
Team: CAL Bears
Sport: Track & Field - Pole Vault
Competition: 81st Clyde Littlefield Texas Relays
Opponent: Various
Result: 6. Place
Location: Mike A. Myers Stadium - Austin, Texas, USA
Date: 04-Apr-2008

4

Google Doodle celebrates disabilities activist Ed Roberts

  • On Monday, Google paid homage to the 78th birthday of Ed Roberts, a pioneer for disability rights and activism, with a Google Doodle.
  • Roberts, who died in 1995, led the early disability rights movement in the United States, according to the Google Doodles blog post.
  • Born on Jan. 23, 1939, Roberts was diagnosed with polio when he was 14 years old. Since Roberts had to rely on an iron lung, or a full-body ventilator, for his condition, he wasn’t able to attend high school in person and studied via telephone until his senior year.
  • After graduating, Roberts went on to become the first student with a severe disability to attend the University of California at Berkeley. 
  • At Berkeley, Roberts launched the Physically Disabled Students Program with other college students with disabilities. This was the first college inclusivity program designed for students with disabilities. Read more
independent.co.uk
Trump threatens to remove funds from university that shut down Milo talk
Donald Trump has threatened to withdraw federal funds from the University of California at Berkeley after protesters caused a talk by the senior editor of Breitbart News to be cancelled.

“If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view - NO FEDERAL FUNDS?” the President tweeted. It was unclear how the threat would be carried out.

Mr Yiannopoulos is a “senior editor” of Breitbart News, whose former executive chair Steve Bannon has been appointed as Mr Trump’s chief strategist.

USA. California. San Francisco. February 1970. Children at a Free Huey, Free Bobby rally in front of the Federal Building. 

While the Civil Rights Movement worked to dismantle Jim Crow laws and push for integration, the BPP developed the Ten Point Platform and Program that called for freedom, full employment, reparations, housing, education, military exemption, end to police brutality and murder, freedom for the incarcerated, Constitutional rights during trial, and full self-determination.

Shames, a student at the University of California, Berkeley, first met Seale in April 1967 at an anti-Vietnam War rally. Seale became a mentor to Shames, and Shames, in turn, became the most trusted photographer to the party.

Photograph: Stephen Shames/Polaris

Rejection!! It kinda sucks!! Updated College Decisions

Accepted:
Tulane University- honors program, merit scholarship
UC San Diego
UC Los Angeles (woohoo!!)
Boston University

Waitlisted:
Northwestern

Rejected:
University of Chicago :(
University of Southern California

Still waiting on:
Berkeley
UPenn
Dartmouth
Princeton
Harvard
George Washington
Georgetown
Stanford

So with the exception of George Washington, I’m expecting to get rejected everywhere else, but kind of hoping for a miracle. Just because of the weight of a title and alumni association in my chosen career path, I’ve always wanted a prestigious school, but who knows at this point!! Also UChicago was my top choice by far and USC is my dad’s Alma mater so it’s safe to say I’m feeling a little crushed at the moment. But it’s okay, because I’m going to college!

Daguerreotype portrait of a California man identified as Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, c. 1850.

Source: University of California, Berkeley.

Parents, mentors, curiosity inspire passion for science

For Black History Month, we asked NSF Graduate Research fellows “Why a career in science?” Here are more of their answers.

“I study new technologies for making fertilizers and disinfectants from human urine. Why? Because making value out of urine can avoid water pollution and increase access to toilets. I use electrochemistry and ion exchange to capture nitrogen in useful forms. Science has always been exciting to me because of the model of asking and figuring out how to answer questions. I am thankful for lots of mentors and opportunities that pointed me to where I am today: combining my love for problem solving with improving the health of overlooked people and our environment.”

– William A. Tarpeh,  Ph.D. student, Department of Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley


“Early in my scientific career, the NSF’s Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) supported my research project at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) identifying pharmacological regulators of cilia length. This experience inspired me to join the Physiology program at Yale, which allows me to pursue similar interests and apply my basic science training to a medically relevant disease.”

– Lindsey Stavola, Ph.D. candidate, Yale School of Medicine


Keep reading

With the Lenten season upon us, I’ll be breaking up photosets to focus on specific holy days.

This post contains a leaf from a 15th century Italian antiphonal with a large historiated initial depicting Christ’s entry into Jerusalem (Palm Sunday).

Source: Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley, Bancroft Library,  BANC MS UCB 059