and this was my plan b

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So… I know some of you are waiting for my store to open. Unfortunately I had my reasons to delay it. Anyway, partially it was frustration from how resin reacts on casting conditions and constant fight with bubbles and such, which was preventing me from takeoff by orders. Today and tomorrow I’m taking a break from doll and spending my time making photos and videos for the store. I’m planning to sell some A and B grade eyes using lower prices :) All items will be sold AS SHOWN, so no returns. Please use your best judgement for all B grade eyes :) Thanks and stay tuned this week for link on the store! Xoxo #store #setup #bjdeyes #bjdeyesforsale

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anonymous asked:

You're all abut calling people names so of course you don't take offense. You also know that Val's fans have been calling Jenna a basic B and a potato head non stop, so I guess that's okay too. Call em like you see em, that's my motto. This also isn't the first time Val has been called on making misogynist statements so I guess it doesn't bother him. Take your own advice and simmer down.

Since you asked, my day is going well now that everyone is back from vacation and the weather is a little dreary due to the cold front coming in.  On a very positive note, I’m off tomorrow to nurse the hangover I plan on having and to get my new storm door installed all while planning to enjoy the newly cool weather in my leggings.  Oh……and they got new toilet paper at work, it’s two ply.  It makes me oddly happy.

9

“Are you planning to follow a career in Magical Law, Miss Granger?” asked Scrimgeour.
“No, I’m not,” retorted Hermione. “I’m hoping to do some good in the world!”

Happy 38th birthday to Hermione Jean Granger! (b. september 19th, 1979)

“I came to America when I was six years old. Mom said she brought us here so that we’d have opportunities in life. She said that back in the Bahamas, it’s only the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots.’ She wanted us to have more choices. But I don’t think she fully understood how things work here. She was a news reporter back in the Bahamas. But the only job she could get here was taking care of oldpeople. My dad could only work construction. We moved to four different states just so they could find work. They always told me, ‘Just study hard in school and everything will work out fine.’ So that was my plan. I got all A’s up until the 11th grade– except for one B in math. My goal was to get top twenty in my class, then go to college, then get a degree, and then get a job. I realized the truth my senior year. My guidance counselor told me I couldn’t get a loan. I couldn’t get financial aid. Even if I could find a way to pay for school, I probably couldn’t get a job. I felt so mad at everyone. There were some kids who completely slacked off in school, but even they were going to college. I started having panic attacks. My dad told me not to worry. He called me a ‘doubting Peter.’ He invited all his friends over to a fish fry to help raise money. And he did get $3,000. But that wasn’t enough. So I searched really hard on the Internet and found the Dream.us scholarship. My mom was so excited when I got it. They’re paying for me to go to Queens College. Now my mom’s really scared again because DACA got revoked. She’s crying all the time at work. I try to tell her that no matter what happens, we’re not going to die. We just might have to start over.”

How I Got Straight A’s in My First Year of University

I was so proud of myself when I received firsts (that’s A’s for those not attending uni in the UK) on all of my assessments in my first year at university. Here are some tips for y’all to try at any point in university. They may be specific at times to my experience—my degree is in the social sciences and humanities, and I’m studying in the UK—but I did try to make them more generally applicable, and hopefully they should be helpful to someone out there.

Part One: Everyday Study Routine

  1. Before the start of the academic year, try to get in a little bit of preparation. See if there are any syllabi or reading lists posted online. You don’t have to pour over them, of course, but do attempt to do something, and have a basic grasp on what will be covered in your classes.
  2. Go to all your lectures and seminars. Unless you absolutely have to miss class because you are ill or have an important obligation to take care of, it’s really important to attend your lectures every day. (Note: if you are struggling with mental or chronic illness or a disability, don’t beat yourself up if you keep missing class. Please take care of yourself.) You may be tempted to just look at the PowerPoint presentation online, but it’s much more effective to be there in person. Often the lecturer may include information or extra explanations which are not included in the presentation. It will also allow you to process the information aurally as well as visually, and you will have the added benefit of taking notes too. You may also be able to ask questions.
  3. Do all the pre-reading for lectures. I know it’s tempting to put it off, but try to work it into your daily routine (because you will have reading to do every day). Inevitably, there will be times where you slip up and don’t have time to finish. If this happens, make sure you catch up on it at some point, because it’s very important to solidifying the concepts you are learning about. Also, the more you read in general, the better you will become at reading (and also writing).
  4. Take diligent notes (for both your lectures and pre-reading), and keep them organized. I prefer to handwrite in a notebook, as it helps me synthesize information rather than just typing it out verbatim—but it is totally up to you. If you do use a notebook, make a table of contents on the first page, where you write the date, topic, class, and page numbers of each set of notes you take. I think it’s a great idea to include your own thoughts and opinions in notes, or linking concepts you are learning to concepts you already know about.
  5. If you have the time, make sure to be reading books/essays/articles and engaging with ideas outside of your regular syllabus. This is one of the most important techniques (in my experience, at least) when it comes to writing essays and answering exam questions. Evidence of wider reading around a topic is a great way to boost the credibility of your argument. It also does wonders to solidify and broaden your conceptualization of certain ideas you may have covered in your classes.
  6. Where possible, try to contribute (as much as you feel comfortable) in seminars. If you are very quiet and reserved, that is totally okay too. I’m with you. But it has helped me tremendously in the past year to push myself to speak up more often in seminars. Talking in seminars allows you to clarify concepts and engage more deeply with the material being discussed (and it might impress your seminar tutor too, though this is secondary to the learning in my opinion).
  7. If you have some nerdy-ass friends, talk with them about your ideas and what you’re both learning in your courses. I can’t tell you the number of essays I’ve written which actually have blossomed out of conversations I’ve had with friends, where they’ve exposed me to topics I’d never heard of before or broadened my view of a concept. Learning from each other in a casual and fun setting is amazing!

Part Two: Assessment Time

  1. When you are given notice about big assignments coming up, such as essays or group projects, try to start working on them ASAP. Trust me, I know how hard it is. This is coming from someone who has dealt for years with chronic procrastination issues and nearly didn’t graduate from high school because of it. But you must start planning as soon as you possibly can, because the due date will come screaming up and before you know it, it’ll be the night before the deadline and you won’t have a clue what you’re writing about. Work it into your daily schedule if you have to. One great tip is to write down the deadline as being earlier (say, a week earlier) than what it actually is. This will prompt you to start earlier than you normally would have.
  2. Do a shitload of reading, widely, from multiple sources. Read everything you can on the topic you are doing your assignment on. For a basic literature review, this means looking through at least 20+ sources. That doesn’t mean carefully perusing each one front to back; it means looking through all the relevant literature to find a few great sources which will really give you a coherent argument and a big picture of the topic at hand.
  3. Keep your sources organized. I use Paperpile, which is a Chrome extension that allows you to save and organize academic sources. I make a folder for each assessment I am working on, and anything I find relevant to my topic, I save it to the folder. This will be a life saver for you when you actually go to plan your paper and also do the referencing.
  4. Content is important, but perhaps even more important is your argument and structure. This mostly applies to essays, but you can apply it to other types of assessments too. Try not to structure your argument in terms of blocks of content—e.g. Paragraph 1 is about Topic A, Paragraph 2 is about Topic B—but rather in terms of how you are laying out your argument. Make sure each part of your essay flows into the next, so that you are, for example, setting up a kind of dialogue or narrative between the different sources you’re using. Also ensure that any point you are making clearly relates back to your main thesis.
  5. If you’re a perfectionist like me: train yourself to remember that there is no such thing as perfect. Try to imagine what the perfect essay would be like. Can you imagine it? It’s probably pretty difficult, right? That’s because there is no such thing as a perfect assignment. Remind yourself of this, constantly. Tell yourself that you will be okay with just doing your very best. If you think about it logically: handing in something that is perhaps not your best ever, but handing it in on time and doing pretty well, is infinitely better than attempting to have a “perfect” essay but handing it in late and failing the assignment.

I hope this helped some of you! Best of luck and happy studying this year—go knock ‘em out! xo

Yes, Plan B is less effective at higher BMI’s, but please, for the love of God stop saying it’s not effective at all, because all you do is make people decide they may as well not use anything when it does still lower the chances of conception.

It is less effective, not ineffective. It is better than nothing if it’s the only thing you have access to at that moment.

anonymous asked:

HAPPY PRIDE MONTH MY DUDE 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈

👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌👌

augustbutnotthemonth  asked:

it's my birthday can you write some headcanons -a person who really likes reading your headcanons

ahhh happy birthday!!

  • allura at her first diplomatic meeting: freshly shined crown, perfect posture, winning smile
    • allura at her hundredth diplomatic meeting: [walks in right after battle with dislocated shoulder] “hey so wanna join our alliance”
  • coran knows slang and curse words from all over the universe
  • would it be unethical for pidge to just stick a tracker on shiro?? hunk?? he’s disappeared twice, it’s kinda shaping up to be a trend-
  • lance: “attention!!” keith: “what now lance” lance: “i don’t know, i just need attention”
  • lance and hunk were those kids that always chose each other first when they were team captains in gym class
    • in most cases it wasn’t even favoritism?? they’re very strategic boys
    • hunk: “pidge is small and good at hiding, which would make her tough to hit. you have like killer aim though so you’re my top pick for sure dude” lance: “dude same? your quick trigger finger is a major advantage and-” keith: “what are you guys talking about??” lance:  “our fantasy laser tag teams for when we get home duh. anyway-”
  • keith: “it’s time for plan b” pidge: “we have a plan b?” keith: “no but it’s time for one”