and this sounds crazy

this is an absolutely wild au, but here me out:

Modern AU where Sam’s a mortician who can astral project into corpses’ last moments if he does it before putrefaction. He does it out of pure curiosity, seeing by time the body makes it to him, the case (if there ever was one) is solved. Sometimes he gets fragmented happy memories before death, usually where the deceased one spent their last moments surrounded by love and family. Sometimes he gets projected into the dim, dark room where they died alone in their sleep. Other times it’s quick, a blur of color and then unwavering darkness; he assumes those ones are car accidents and he’s usually right. Rinse, wash and repeat for the last 5 static years of Sam’s life.

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ok im actually in work and shouldn’t be on my phone but I’ve got a lot of conspiracy theories about this sl now because I’ve barely slept this week so just wait for how crazy ur gal is going to sound

but anyway hear me out

we knew the wedding date (roughly) by like january, right? but this hour long special is airing in like three weeks and we know nothing other than it being described as a “state of the nation” type episode for aaron and roberts relationship

im telling u there’s a twist. i don’t know what but this episode is so tightly under wraps i bet it is happening there’s gonna be a twist 👀👀

Through Thick and Thin P2

Part One Here

Pairing: Sam x Reader 

Characters: Sam, the Reader, mention of Dean, Crowley 

Warnings: angst, swearing, a little bit of protective!sam 

Word Count: 1294

Summary: Sam tries to prove that he’s telling the truth and the Reader must decide what she wants to do next. 

Tag List: @amanda-teaches @myplaceofthingsilove@evyiione @mogaruke@aliensdeservebetter@27bmm@bambinovak @spnfanficpond

A/N: This is part two of a request by @behindfairies :) to see the request either check out my page or part one! As always feedback is welcomed and encouraged:)

Originally posted by bringmesomepie56

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anonymous asked:

At the current rate the kickstarter is on track to get around half a million dollars. Can you add a Stretch Goal of $250,000+: Contact Trigger to make a Unsounded anime? It sounds crazy but /a/ crowd funded the Little Witch Academia movie, it isn't impossible. Given how anime is made you could easily do all the story boards so al they had to do was the motion frames, it would cut the costs alot.

You might want to check your math ;D

anonymous asked:

i once found this girl on tinder that looked exactly like me. apparently she'd been using my selfies to catfish old creepy guys into sending her money on paypal. i confronted her about it and fast forward 4 years i've fallen hard and im gonna ask her to marry me tonight. what if i mess up???? holy shit

I???????????? this sounds deadass so wild like some crazy ass fanfiction?????? good luck my guy you’ve got this let me know how it goes!!!!!!!!

DON’T CALL ME SIR💛💛

I don’t know why I hate being called “sir.”

I’m mean, the obvious reason is that I’m nonbinary. I don’t identify as either a man or a woman and so “sir” doesn’t apply to me. “Ma’am” doesn’t apply either, of course, and explaining nonbinary identity to a store clerk or server seems like too much effort most of the time. But my real aversion — the reason I really hate these gendered service words — is that they _are_ polite. I know it sounds crazy, and we aren’t used to thinking of it this way, but it is considered polite to affirm a person’s status in a gendered way. It’s polite to acknowledge another person’s place in the gender hierarchy.

Perhaps I’m just crazy. I know I’m sensitive. And, I know that being called ma’am or sir is normal for most folks. I know that it goes beyond normal. In most situations, people _expect_ it and take it as a clue that whoever is talking respects them. The customer, the Sir, feels heard and respected and seen. _Isn’t it funny that I feel the opposite?_ Isn’t it funny that, when someone “sirs” me, I get frustrated and feel like shouting “I’m not like every customer!” I want the salesperson to see me and understand me, and when they use the everyday expected words of commerce, I get antsy. I surely don’t want to stick around and eat and buy and shop.

Oh yes, I’m a snowflake. I’ll gladly admit it. But maybe all that “snowflake” connotes isn’t accurate. Snowflakes are supposed to be weak right? Maybe since I’ve survived years of being misunderstood and mischaracterized, I’m strong. Maybe since I’ve lived with a truth that, over the years, has had to be stuffed and sidelined and kept secret, I’m strong. Maybe since I’ve learned how to survive by hiding and cowering and swallowing shame, I’m strong. Shouldn’t our language show people like me the respect and specificity we deserve? Maybe we come up with new terms. Maybe we revamp some old ones. But something needs to change.

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

The heart beat

It happened again. The same painful disaster. It was happening everyday, so annoying, so unendurable. And to think, everything was so peaceful and nice for Bendy and Boris only a little while ago. Their lives were perfect, they didn’t have anything to worry about and have nothing to fear. Until Bendy got that illness. Everything changed for them both. Now instead of having fun and living their lives they had to put their effort into finding the lost items for the machine in order to save Bendy from all of this pain, and at the same time dealing with those two guys who were out to end them. This all has became an unbearable daily routine for both of them. Especially for Boris. Bendy wasn’t really worried for himself as much as for his bro, who didn’t have anyone else other than him. The older was trying not to pay too much attention to his condition and stay positive to not make his bro too anxious, and Boris also was trying not to think about it too much. At first it wasn’t too hard, but as this keeps happening more and more, Boris just couldn’t ignore it anymore. He was being really stressed and scared, even though he was trying hard not to show it off and not think about it. But this time that was exactly what he was doing, thinking about it. He was sitting on the grass, gazing at his beloved brother who was sleeping peacefully, lying his head on his shirt that he took off a moment ago when the pain attack kicked in again. This time, it seems to be worse than usual.

It was already late evening, but they were both still peppy and were still walking. Suddenly, Bendy curved with a painful groan, falling down while gripping to his stomach. Boris instantly ran towards his brother to help him. Bendy was shaking like crazy, he could barely make any sounds other than just squeaking, felt like something was blocking his breath. At one point, he just fell to his brother’s arms with no sound or movements. Boris started to freak out as he realized that Bendy was no longer trying to breathe, he wasn’t breathing at all! His panic level was increasing as the older one was still unconscious, he tried to pat him softly on the cheek but he was still not moving. Boris could no longer control himself, he started screaming and crying loudly as he was shaking his brother.
“BENDY!! BENDY, NO! COME ON! WAKE UP!! STAY WITH ME PLEASE!!!!” desperately pleaded Boris. Fortunately, the luck was on their side again. After few minutes, Bendy opened his eyes, taking a deep breath and started to cough constantly. He pulled his hand to his throat as a  stream of black liquid flowed down from his mouth to the ground. After that, he took a relived breath and lied on Boris’s lap. The pain was gone.

Bendy seems to be much better now. But not Boris, he was still terrified after what just happened, for a moment there, he actually thought that everything was over…and seems like Bendy was getting ready for that. For the last few days, Bendy was pushing his young brother much harder to be independent and self-capable. And that was showing the fact that he was ready to give up and die, or at least that’s what Boris thought. And  he couldn’t stand that thought. The thought of losing the one person he loved, the thought of never get to see his smile, hear his voice, never get to hug him, listen to his teaching or just goof around with him. And what will he do without Bendy? Where will he go? He could still try to find and fix the machine on his own, but what is the purpose if he already lost his beloved one? All of those thoughts were causing him a headache. His eyes started to tear up.
No… he is strong enough… he’s not gonna leave me… I know he won’t” silently sobed the young wolf while wiping his eyes.
He looked at his brother, who was still sleeping like a little baby. Boris slowly crawled next to him, trying to be as quite as possible to not wake him up. He seems so pacified, like he never got any deadly diseases. Boris moved his sight to Bendy’s exposed chest that was lowering and rising because of his breathing. He moved his head closer and placed his ear on it.

“Ba bump…” a quiet and pleasant sound is what he heard. The sound of a beating heart, his brother’s  heart.  The sound of life that he valued more than anyone else’s.  It was such a satisfying sound, just listening to that slow beat made Boris so relaxed. All the heavy thoughts were gone, all the worries been drawn away, all that he was thinking now is that his bro was still there, he was still alive. This fact was giving him hope that at one day, all of this pain and suffering would be over, and they will go back to those wonderful times when they could live peacefully with reasons to be nervous or scared.

Boris got carried away so deep in his thoughts that he didn’t realized how he lied down completely on his bro’s chest. He was brought back to reality when someone’s hand gently caressed his forehead.

“Boris, could you get up? You’re too heavy…” Bendy’s soft voice broke the silence. Boris instantly got up nervously rubbing the back of his neck.

“Sorry…” he said with a soft smile.

“What were you even doing?” the other asked.

“Nothing… I just wanted a hug!” childly answered Boris.

“*Yawn* you’ll get your hug tomorrow… I’m very tired…” wearily said Bendy as he flipped over to another side. “You should go to sleep too, it’s really late…”

“Okay” Boris lied down on his back next to Bendy, gazing upon the night sky. He felt much more confident about completing their quest. Only positive thoughts from now on, whining won’t get them nowhere. Other people deserves to be saved too, no one has to go through all this. Being with those who you love is the biggest treasure, and Boris was determined to keep his treasure. Forever.
“Good night Bendy! I love you ~” said Boris as he closed his eyes and start falling asleep.
“Mhmn… love you too, bro…” Mumbled Bendy through his sleep.
Tomorrow is a new day, new challenges to deal with, and new progress to make.

____________________________

Hello there! i’ll be frank, it’s not my first time writing fics, but it is my first sibmission to you!

sorry if there any mistakes i haven’t notice, English is not my first language (plus i’m pretty sure i’ve cheked everything) (⇀‸↼‶)

i fell in love with your AU and it gave me an idea for this “masterpeaceofshit” XP

i also wanna use this oppertunity to tell you dat you are my very favorite artist! your ideas and drawing are stunning and they always inspire me! thank you so much for sharing your work with us Rouge, u da best! (= ̄ω ̄=)

fic by katethepeach

art by Rouge