and this scene has some of my favorite animations in it

Full Esquire Interview - CHRIS EVANS IS READY TO FIGHT

“HIS SUCCESS AS CAPTAIN AMERICA HAS MADE CHRIS EVANS ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S SURE THINGS, WHICH MEANS HE CAN DO WHATEVER HE WANTS WITH HIS FREE TIME. SO WHY JUMP OUT OF AIRPLANES AND GET INTO IT WITH DAVID DUKE?

BY MAXIMILLIAN POTTERMAR 15, 2017


The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, "Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

While we were waiting to board the plane, Evans told me that as he lay in bed the night before, “I started exploring the sensation of ‘What if the chute doesn’t open?’. . .”

Oh, did you now?

“. . .Those last minutes where you know.” As in you know you’re going to fatally splat. “You’re not gonna pass out; you’re gonna be wide awake. So what? Do I close my eyes? Hopefully, it would be quick. Lights out. I fucking hope it would be quick. And then I was like, if you’re gonna do it, let’s just pretend there is no way this is going to go wrong. Just really embrace it and jump out of that plane with gusto.” Evans also shared that he’d looked up the rate of skydiving fatalities. “It’s, like, 0.006 fatalities per one thousand jumps. So I figure our odds are pretty good.”

Again the crew member shouts, “Who’s going first?”

Again I look at Evans; again he looks at me. The rat is running circles in my belly.

I look at Evans; he looks at me.

Another crew member asks, “So whose idea was this, anyway?”


That’s an excellent question.

I ask Evans the same thing when we first meet, the evening before our jump, at his house. He lives atop the Hollywood Hills, in a modern-contemporary ranch in the center of a Japanese-style garden. The place has the vibe of an L.A. meditation retreat—there’s even a little Buddha statue on the front step.

The dude who opens the front door is in jeans, a T-shirt, and Nikes; he has on a black ball cap with the NASA logo, and his beard is substantial enough that for a second it’s hard to be sure this is the same guy who plays the baby-faced superhero. Our handshake in the doorway is interrupted when his dog rockets toward my crotch. Evans is sorry about that.

We do the small-talk thing. Evans is from a suburb of Boston, one of four kids raised by Dad, a dentist, and Mom, who ran a community theater. The point is, he’s a Patriots fan, and with Super Bowl LI, between the Pats and the Falcons, just a few days away at the time, it’s about the only thing on his mind. You bet your Sam Adams–guzzling ass he’s going to the game in Houston. “Oh my God,” he says, doing a little dance. “I can’t believe it’s this weekend.”

Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

Evans won’t be rolling to SB LI with a posse of Beantown-to-Hollywood A-listers like Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon, and Ben Affleck. For the record, he’s never met Damon, and his only interaction with Wahlberg was a couple years ago at a Patriots event. Evans has, however, humiliated himself in front of Affleck.

Around 2006, Evans met with Affleck to talk about Gone Baby Gone, which Affleck was directing. Evans was walking down a hallway, looking for the room where they were supposed to meet. Walking by an open office, he heard Affleck, in that thick Boston accent of his, shout, “There he is!” (Evans does a perfect Affleck impersonation.)

By then, Evans had hit the big time for his turn as the Human Torch, Johnny Storm, in 2005’s Fantastic Four, but he still got starstruck. As he tells it, “First thing I say to him: 'Am I going to be okay where I parked?’ He was like, 'Where did you park?’ I said, 'At a meter.’ And he was like, 'Did you put money in the meter?’ And I said, 'Yep.’ And he says, 'Well, I think you’ll be okay.’ I was like, this is off to a great fucking start.” Stating the obvious here: Evans did not get the part.

No, Evans will be heading to the Super Bowl with his brother and three of his closest buddies. Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for imposing that suspension on Tom Brady for Deflategate. Grabbing two beers from a fridge that’s otherwise basically empty, Evans says, “I just want to see Goodell hand the trophy to Brady. Goodell. Piece of shit.”

In Evans’s living room, there’s not a single hint of his Captain Americaness. Earth tones, tables that appear to be made of reclaimed wood. Open. Uncluttered. Glass doors open onto a backyard with a stunning view of the Hills. Evans stretches out on one of two couches. I take the other and ask, “Just whose idea was it to jump?” Since we both know whose idea it wasn’t, we both know that what I’m really asking is Why? Why, dude, do you want to jump (with me) from a goddamn airplane? “Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Settling in on the couch, he groans. Evans explains that he’s hurting all over because he just started his workout routine the day before to get in shape for the next two Captain America films. The movies will be shot back to back beginning in April. After that, no more red- white-and-blue costume for the thirty-five-year-old. He will have fulfilled his contract.

“Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Back in 2010, Marvel presented Evans with a nine-picture deal. He insisted he’d sign on for no more than six. Some family members thought he was nuts to dial back such a secure and lucrative gig. Evans saw it differently.

It takes five months to shoot a Marvel movie, and when you tack on the promotional obligations for each one, well, shit, man. Evans knew that for as long as he was bound to Captain America, he would have little time to take on other projects. He wanted to direct, he wanted to play other characters—roles that were more human—like the lead in Gifted, which will hit theaters this month. The script had brought him to tears. Evans managed to squeeze the movie in between Captain America and Avengers films.

FOX Searchlight

In Gifted, Evans stars as Frank Adler. You don’t get much more human than Adler, a grease-under-his-nails boat-engine mechanic living the bachelor life in Florida. After a series of tragic circumstances, Adler becomes a surrogate father to his niece, Mary, a first-grader with the IQ of Einstein. He recognizes that Mary is a little genius, and he does his best to prevent anyone else from noticing. Given the aforementioned circumstances, Adler has witnessed what can happen when a kid with a brilliant mind is pushed too hard too quickly. Then along comes Mary’s teacher. She discovers the child’s gift, and a Kramer vs. Kramer–esque drama ensues.

During a moment in the film when things aren’t going Adler’s way, he sarcastically refers to himself as a “fucking hero.” Evans says the line didn’t lead him to make comparisons between superhero Steve Rogers (aka Captain America) and Everyman hero Frank Adler. But now that you mention it . . . 

“With Steve Rogers,” Evans says, “even though you’re on a giant movie with a huge budget and strange costumes, you’re still on a hunt for the truth of the character.” That said, “with Adler, it’s nice to play someone relatable. I think Julianne Moore said, 'The audience doesn’t come to see you; they come to see themselves.’ Adler is someone you can hold up as a mirror for someone in the audience. They’ll be able to far more easily identify with Frank Adler than Steve Rogers.”

Dodger. That’s the name of Evans’s dog, the one who headbutted my nuts and has since done a marvelous job of making amends by nuzzling against me on the couch. Evans got him while he was filming Gifted; one of the last scenes was shot in an animal shelter in Georgia. Evans had wanted a dog ever since his last pooch died in 2012. Then he found himself walking the aisles of this pound, and there was this mixed-breed boxer, wagging his tail and looking like he belonged with Evans.

Dodger is not exactly a name you’d think a die-hard Boston sports fan would pick. His boys from back home have given him a ton of shit over it. But he has not abandoned his Red Sox for the L.A. team. As a kid, he loved the Disney animated movie Oliver & Company, and his favorite character was Dodger. Anticipating the grief he was going to get from his pals, Evans considered other names. “You could name your dog Doorknob,” he says, “and in a month he’s fucking Doorknob.” Evans’s mom convinced him to go with his gut.

Right around when Evans was wrapping Gifted and heading back to L.A. with Dodger, the 2016 presidential campaign was still in that phase when no one, including the actor—a Hillary Clinton supporter—thought Trump had a shot. He still can’t believe Trump won.

“I feel rage,” he says. “I feel fury. It’s unbelievable. People were just so desperate to hear someone say that someone is to blame. They were just so happy to hear that someone was angry. Hear someone say that Washington sucks. They just want something new without actually understanding. I mean, guys like Steve Bannon—Steve Bannon!—this man has no place in politics.”

Evans has made, and continues to make, his political views known on Twitter. He tweeted that Trump ought to “stop energizing lies,” and he recently ended up in a heated Twitter debate with former KKK leader David Duke over Trump’s pick of Jeff Sessions for attorney general. Duke baselessly accused Evans of being anti-Semitic; Evans encouraged Duke to try love: “It’s stronger than hate. It unites us. I promise it’s in you under the anger and fear.” Making political statements and engaging in such public exchanges is a rather risky thing for the star of Captain America to do. Yes, advisors have said as much to him. “Look, I’m in a business where you’ve got to sell tickets,” he says. “But, my God, I would not be able to look at myself in the mirror if I felt strongly about something and didn’t speak up. I think it’s about how you speak up. We’re allowed to disagree. If I state my case and people don’t want to go see my movies as a result, I’m okay with that.”

Trump. Bannon. Politics. Now Evans is animated. He gets off the couch, walks out onto his porch, and lights a cigarette. “Some people say, 'Don’t you see what’s happening? It’s time to yell,' ” Evans says. “Yeah, I see it, and it’s time for calm. Because not everyone who voted for Trump is going to be some horrible bigot. There are a lot of people in that middle; those are the people you can’t lose your credibility with. If you’re trying to change minds, by spewing too much rhetoric you can easily become white noise.”


Evans has a pretty remarkable “How I got to Hollywood” story.

During his junior year of high school, he knew he wanted to act. He was doing it a lot. In school. At his mom’s theater. He loved it. “When you’re doing a play at thirteen years old and have opening night? None of my friends had opening nights. 'I can’t have a sleepover, guys; I have an opening night tonight.' ”

That same year, he did a two-man play. For all of the twenty-plus plays Evans had done up to that point, preparation meant going home, memorizing lines, and doing a few run-throughs with the cast. However, for this play, Fallen Star, he and his costar would rehearse by running dialogue with each other. Hour upon hour, night after night.

Fallen Star is about two friends, one of whom has just died. As the play opens, one of the characters comes home after the funeral to find his dead friend’s ghost. Evans was the ghost. Waiting backstage on opening night, he knew he didn’t have every line memorized, but he had the essence and emotion of the play down. Onstage, he remembers, “I was saying the lines not because they were memorized but because the play was in me. I was believing what I was saying.”

He was hooked. He wanted to do more of this kind of acting—real acting. He wanted to do films, in which the camera was right on him and he could just be the character, rather than theater, in which an actor must perform to the back of the room.

A family friend who was a television actor advised Evans that if he wanted to go to Hollywood, he needed an agent. Toward the end of his junior year, he had a ballsy request for his parents: If he found an internship with a casting agent in New York City, would they allow him to live there and cover the rent? They agreed. Evans landed a gig with Bonnie Finnegan, who was then working on the television show Spin City.

“I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

Evans chose to intern with a casting agent because he figured he had more of a chance to interact with other agents trying to get auditions for their clients.

The kid was sixteen years old.

Finnegan put Evans on the phone; his responsibilities included setting up appointments for auditions. By the end of the summer, he picked the three agents he had the best rapport with and asked each of them to give him a five-minute audition. All three said yes. After seeing his audition, all three were interested.

Evans went with the one Finnegan recommended, Bret Adams, who told Evans to return to New York for auditions in January, television pilot season. Back home, Evans doubled up on a few classes the first semester of his senior year, graduated early, and went back to New York in January. He got the same shithole apartment in Brooklyn and the same internship with Finnegan. He landed a part on the pilot Opposite Sex. Even better, the show got picked up and would start shooting in L.A. that fall.

“I know I’m going to L.A. in August,” Evans says, recalling that period. “So I go home and that spring I would wake up around noon, saunter into high school just to see my buddies, and we’d go get high in the parking lot. I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

He wasn’t in L.A. for even a month when he got a call from home. His parents were divorcing. Evans never saw it coming.

Family and love and the struggles therein are part of what attracted Evans to Gifted.

“In my own life, I have a deep connection with my family and the value of those bonds,” he says. “I’ve always loved stories about people who put their families before themselves. It’s such a noble endeavor. You can’t choose your family, as opposed to friends. Especially in L.A. You really get to see how friendships are put to the test; it stirs everyone’s egos. But if something goes south with a friend, you have the option to say we’re not friends anymore. Your family—that’s your family. Trying to make that system work and trying to make it not just functional but actually enjoyable is a really challenging endeavor, and that’s certainly how it is with my family.”


the plane, a decision is made.

“I want to see you jump first,” Evans shouts my way.

Of course he does.

Like any respectable and legal skydiving center, Skydive Perris, which is providing us with this “experience,” doesn’t just strap a chute on your back. First, you go to a room for a period of instruction. Then you go to another room, where you sign away your rights.

You may be wondering how the star of a billion-dollar franchise with two pictures to shoot gets clearance to jump from an airplane—never mind the low rate of fatalities, as Evans has presented it. So am I.

“Well, they give you all these crazy insurance policies, but even if I die, what are they going to do? Sue my family? They’d probably cast some new guy at a cheaper price and save some money.”

Thinking the answer is almost certainly going to be no, I ask Evans if he’s ever gone skydiving before. Turns out he has, with an ex-girlfriend. Turns out that ex-girlfriend is now married to Justin Timberlake. Evans and Jessica Biel dated off and on from 2001 to 2006. They took the leap together when Biel hatched the idea for one Valentine’s Day. According to media accounts, Evans was recently dating his Gifted costar Jenny Slate, who plays the teacher. “Yeah,” he says, “but I’m steering clear of those questions.” You can almost feel his heart pinch.

“There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around.”

We end up broadly discussing the unique challenges an international star like Evans faces when it comes to dating, specifically the trust factor. Evans supposes that’s why so many actors date other actors: “There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around,” he says. “Letting someone go to work with someone for three months and they won’t see them. It really, it certainly puts the relationship to the test.”

In Gifted, there’s a moment when Slate’s character asks Adler what his greatest fear is. Frank Adler’s greatest fear is that he’ll ruin his niece’s life. Evans’s greatest fear is having regrets.

“Like always kind of wanting to be there as opposed to here. I think I’m worried all of a sudden I’ll get old and have regrets, realize that I’ve not cultivated enough of an appreciation for the now and surrendering to the present moment.”

Evans’s musings have something to do with the fact that he has been reading The Surrender Experiment. “It’s about the basic notion that we are only in a good mood when things are going our way,” he says. “The truth is, life is going to unfold as it’s going to unfold regardless of your input. If you are an active participant in that awareness, life kind of washes over you, good or bad. You kind of become Teflon a little bit to the struggles that we self-inflict.”

He continues: “Our conscious minds are very spread out. We worry about the past. We worry about the future. We label. And all of that stuff just makes us very separate. What I’m trying to do is just quiet it down. Put that brain down from time to time and hope those periods of quiet and stillness get longer. When you do that, what rises from the mist is a kind of surrendering. You’re more connected as opposed to being separate. A lot of the questions about destiny or fate or purpose or any of that stuff—it’s not like you get answers. You just realize you didn’t need the questions.”

This here—this stuff about surrendering, letting life unfold, taking the leap—this is why he wanted to go skydiving. It’s why that sixteen-year-old took the leap and did the summer in New York; it’s why he took the leap and turned down the nine-picture deal; it’s why he got Dodger. Surrender. Take the leap.

And so I go first.

Oh, one important detail: Novice jumpers like Evans and me, we don’t jump solo. Thank God. Each of us is doing a tandem jump. Each of us is strapped with our back to a professional jumper’s front. I’m strapped to a forty-four-year-old dude named Paul. Considering what’s about to happen, I figure I should know a little something about Paul. He tells me he used to own a bar in Chicago. Evans is strapped to a young woman named Sam, who looks to be twenty-something. She’s got a purplish-pink streak in her black hair and says things like “badass.” In fact, Sam introduced herself  by saying, “I’m Sam, but you can call me Badass.”

At the plane’s open door, my mind goes to my wife and two teenage sons, to those I love, and to the texts I just sent in case my chute fails. Then Paul and I—well, really mostly Paul—rock gently back and forth to build momentum to push away from the plane, to push away from all that seems sane.

Three.

Two.

One.

Holy fuck.

HOLY FUCK. This is what I scream as we free-fall from 12,500 feet, at more than a hundred miles an hour, toward the earth. Which I cannot take my eyes off of. I think about nothing. Not living. Not dying. Nothing. I simply feel . . . I have let go.

Suddenly, it all stops. I’m jerked up. Paul has pulled the chute, and it does indeed open. This is fantastic, because it means we have a much better chance of not dying. But it’s also kind of a bummer. I had let go. Of everything. I had chosen to play those odds Evans had talked about. I had embraced jumping and letting life unfold.

Now I had been jerked back. I would land. Back on the earth I had been so high above and from which I had been so far removed. Back in all of it.

Once I’m on the ground, safe and in one piece, a staffer runs over and asks how I feel. I say, “I feel like Captain America.”

The staffer runs over and asks Evans the same question. He says he feels great. Then he’s asked another question: What was your favorite part?

“Jumping out,” he says. “Jumping out is always a real thrill.”


This article appears in the April '17 issue of Esquire.

Inside the super-sized Glee reunion on The Flash-Supergirl musical crossover

Darren Criss is singing his heart out. Grant Gustin and Melissa Benoist are tap dancing. “It’s literally a Glee episode,” Gustin jokes. No, the Fox series hasn’t been revived. The trio are actually reuniting for the first time since their days on the Emmy-nominated hit series for a different kind of musical — and Criss may finally get his revenge.

His Glee character, Blaine Anderson, received a slushy facial from Gustin’s Sebastian Smythe back in 2012, but now the tables have turned, with Criss assuming the mantle of the dastardly DC Comics villain Music Meister in the highly anticipated Flash/Supergirl musical crossover. “It is funny that the last time I worked with Grant, he was the bad guy and he was singing at me, and now I’m the bad guy singing at him,” Criss says. Though it’s a different set, with the quick turnaround and prep, Criss concurs that this all feels familiar. “It’s just Glee,” he says.

In the March 21 episode of The Flash, Barry (Gustin) and Kara (Benoist) find themselves trapped in a movie musical of the Meister’s creation — an hour that has been years in the making. “We’ve always talked about doing it, from the very beginning, more in a joking way,” says executive producer Andrew Kreisberg. Gustin, however, was initially curious. “I didn’t ever think it would be a real thing, so when they told me it was real, I was like, ‘How?!‘”

Here’s how: As the Scarlet Speedster and Girl of Steel experience turmoil in their interpersonal relationships, they’re whammied by the Music Meister, a less mustache-twirling, more manipulative villain who causes victims to break into song. The character was famously voiced by Neil Patrick Harris in the Batman: The Brave and the Bold animated series. “I have made a pretty decent career of only taking over roles as made famous by child stars,” jokes Criss, who also played the titular wizard in the Harry Potter musical.

“I could not be happier that he’s here,” gushes Benoist, whose Glee character Marley Rose was mentored by Blaine. “He’s killing this role. He’s bringing such a fun energy, the way he did on Glee as well.”

Being fans of movie musicals as kids, the power-stripped heroes end up trapped in a golden-age send-up involving rival gangs and their kids falling in love — though expect many of the couples to come with a twist. The only way out? Follow the Meister’s script till the end. It may be a prison to them, but it’s heaven to Benoist. Noting she was born in the wrong era, the actress takes delight in the vintage ambience while sitting on a ’40s-era nightclub set. “Not that I don’t love the [Supergirl] suit, but it just feels good playing the same character in a completely different setting,” she says. “I’m eating this up.”

The Glee alums aren’t the only big names attached to the special episode. In a nod to Kara’s favorite film Wizard of Oz, everyone else in the vocally impressive cast is playing a character within this movie, from Jesse L. Martin, Victor Garber, and John Barrowman as rival mob bosses to Jeremy Jordan’s club pianist and Carlos Valdes’ aspiring artist busboy. Cherry-picking the movie musical genre — West Side Story, Singing in the Rain, and Guys and Dolls among the show’s inspirations — the hour also features some original songs, including “Runnin’ Home to You” from Oscar-winning La La Land duo Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, as well as the bubbly and playful Rachel Bloom co-penned tap duet “Super Friend.” “It’s a goofy song and it’s very consistent with that style of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” Gustin says.

“We were approached by Rachel Bloom, who reached out to us and she really wanted to write a song for us,” Kreisberg explains. “And Greg [Berlanti] had a relationship with Pasek and Paul, so we sat down with them — we hadn’t even seen La La Land with them, but Greg had been such huge fans of theirs.”

The episode also includes several covers, among them the Benoist solo “Moon River,” and an ensemble performance of Jackie DeShannon’s “Put a Little Love in Your Heart” that brings the denizens of the ’40s nightclub to their feet as the Meister conducts Jordan, Valdes, and John Barrowman in an epic, upbeat dance number choreographed by Glee’s Zachary Woodlee. “Some things are just star-crossed,” Valdes says of his two worlds — superheroes and musicals — colliding. “Some things are just destined and written in the stars. This felt like one of those instances where it was just something that was going to happen.”

Jordan concurs: “Ever since they announced the cast of our show — plus the casts of Flash and other shows having so many musical theater people in them — it was only a matter of time before they harnessed those talents and made something into it.”

All involved have unquestionable talents when it comes to singing, but Barrowman says the DeShannon piece doesn’t play to his strengths: “I’m exceptionally confident vocally, but they show me the dance steps and I’m not a hip-hopper, no way,” says Barrowman, who practices his moves on set between takes. “I panicked.” Still, Barrowman was determined to be involved once he learned of the crossover. “I hadn’t heard anything and I just basically then said, ‘I think you would be daft or stupid not to have me in this, really,‘” he says. “But they planned on it all along.”

On the flip side, Gustin says he was excited about slipping back into his dance shoes. “More than anything else, my true foundation was tap dance,” the actor says. “It’s been cool to get back to it.” Adds Benoist: “It’s funny how things stay in your muscle memory. It was fun to pick it back up again and see your body and be like, ‘Oh, we remember how to do this.'”

With everyone in one room, Barrowman admits, “I’m a bit fan-boying out to be honest,” explaining that he watched his castmates’ former projects Glee and Smash. “What a nerd,” Jordan responds upon hearing the news. “He plays it super cool backstage, so you wouldn’t know he was geeking out.”

Beyond Glee, the hour marks an even bigger reunion as Gustin and Supergirl‘s Chris Wood — who, along with co-star David Harewood, will guest in the crossover, but not sing — went to school together, while Criss counts Valdes, Pasek, and Paul as classmates. “It’s been a very sentimental crossover on so many levels,” Criss says. “Every day, every scene my mind is being blown. I can’t believe I’m here with Melissa Benoist and Carlos Valdes. ‘How do you guys even know each other? Oh, that’s right, you’re both superheroes!'”

Fun fact: Another classmate of theirs, Andy Mientus, also previously played a villain on The Flash, with Criss joking it’s about damn time he appeared in the Berlanti-verse. “I was wondering why everybody else I knew had been on the show but me,” Criss says with a laugh. In truth, Kreisberg says Criss was destined to play this role. “Darren so brings him to life,” the EP says. “I’m not sure who we would have gotten to do it if Darren had said no, but it turned out to be one of those things where we wanted Darren and Darren actually wanted the part. It was very kismet.”

Should the crossover prove successful, Kreisberg even has hopes for a sequel, and Criss would be elated to return to the wild, wild world of singing superheroes. “I would have liked to have written some songs,” quips the actor and musician, who landed the role too late in the process to do so. “I want to come back, I’m not done — then I’ll have my true payback!” Watch out, Flash!

The musical crossover will kick off at the end of Supergirl‘s March 20 hour, with the majority of the action taking place during The Flash‘s March 21 episode, both airing at 8 p.m. ET on The CW.

batb things i liked (spoilers, sorry)

‘I SAW BEAUTY AND THE BEAST TWO NIGHTS AGO AND I STILL CAN’T HELP GUSHING OVER HOW BEAUTIFUL THE MOVIE WAS


-i wanted to scream the moment i saw the castle in the beginning

-that prologue??? i like how they kept adam’s real face a mystery, as he was hidden behind the layers of make up. 

-’belle’ ahhhhh 

-i was expecting that emma would have auto-tuned her voice because of the audio they had released months before the premiere, but boy did it surprise me.

-’belle’ was so nostalgic i had to refrain myself from singing along in the cinema.

-maurice wasn’t only an inventor, he was also an artist. and belle wasn’t only a bibliophile, she was also an inventor (witty belle, creating probably the first washing machine)

-emma’s grunt after the line ‘madame gaston, his little wife’

-philippe was loyal af, esp in the scene where maurice was almost trapped by the wolves and philippe had waited for him to jump. if you were to get a horse, pick one that is as loyal as philippe.

-i love how the beast couldnt care less if maurice had used his stuff, had eaten, had heated up by the fire, had trespassed in his castle but lost all his temper the moment maurice had cut a rose from his rose garden. 

-im not sure if its me, or the village felt small and congested, i was hoping for a more field-like village, the one i got used to in the animated version.

-BE OUR GUEST, BE OUR GUEST AHHHHHH and was disney telling us that Aladdin will be the next film to have a live action movie???

-adam’s ‘are-you-fucking-kidding-me’ eye roll at the mention of romeo and juliet being belle’s favorite book.

-’i had an expensive education’ OH YEAH I THINK THE CREATORS OF THE ANIMATED FILM HAD FORGOTTEN THAT HE WAS A PRINCE AND SHOULD HAVE HAD EXPENSIVE EDUCATION (OR AT LEAST HE SHOULD KNOW HOW TO READ)

-’some of them in greek’. ADAM IS A BIBLIOPHILE AND HE GAVE BELLE THE LIBRARY !!!!!!

-belle’s laughter adam gave her the library.

-my poor baby lefou

-i ship gafou im sorry

-ewan mcgregor’s french accent is en pointe???

-AUDRA MCDONALD, JOSH GAD AND HARRIET JONES (SHE PLAYED ADAM’S MOTHER) !!!!!!!! I LOVE THIS CAST 

-i love how adam still dresses like a prince even in his beast form, ummm that waistcoat in something there and the scene where they had walked into the bridge was fine man. 

-that paris scene, thank you so much for giving us so much more than the animated film has given. also, prince adam’s back story about how he has grown to be a spoiled prince. thank you, thankyou, disney.

-EMMA THOMPSON SINGING BATB HUHUHUHU AND THEM DANCING WAS THE MOST NOSTALGIC PART OF THE MOVIE I WANTED TO CRY SO BAD MY TWO SMOL CHILDREN 

-gaston definitely wins asshole of the year, although i like how they put more depth into gaston’s character

-lmao when maurice talked to the driver as if nothing happened, that was hilarious.

-the cursed furniture wouldn’t have been hurt if they had stayed silent and dead, but they had fought to protect adam while he’s lamenting over his loss. his servants loved him albeit his attitude towards them. 

-when gaston showed up with a gun, adam literally did nothing, and you can just see his heart breaking by looking into his eyes

-umm agathe? what are you doing? whose side are you on? is this kind of a test or something?

-’MR. POTTS!’ 

-how old is adam? why is his age not mentioned in the movie? i know he should have someone love him by the age of 21, as from the animated film, but they did not mention it? and why hadnt they mentioned his name???

-’come back, i love you’

-THE MOMENT ADAM TURNED AROUND OKAY DAM ADAM YOU A FINE PRINCE. 

-le fou dancin with stanley made me so happy 

-the growl™

the ‘no longer human’ (2010) that you probably haven’t seen (and nakahara chuuya’s significant role in dazai osamu’s life)

You read that right. ‘Ningen shikkaku’, or as we know it, ‘No Longer Human’ had a movie that came out on 2010, directed by Genjiro Arato and starring Toma Ikuta as Oba Yozo (and to a lesser extent, Dazai Osamu). 

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9

“In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines

Lived twelve little girls in two straight lines

In rain or shine

They left the house at half past nine

The smallest one was Madeline.”

-Ludwig Bemelmans, Madeline, 1939

I would like to share a sampling of the graduation project that I had so much fun illustrating! It’s an old series, but one of my childhood favorites. There has been a TV series and a live action film, but never a modern-ish animated feature, and it was a bit of a passion project to imagine what it would look like, down to the character designs and the actual scenes.

Also, I might have some good news to announce soon… keeping my fingers crossed in the meantime! ♪

Track-By-Track Guide to 'How To Be A Human Being'

“Life Itself”
This one actually started off as a dark, slow, moody track. Quite insular. But eventually we realized there was a cheekiness to the lyrics that we hadn’t really explored, so we injected a sense of optimism into the music. The character that this track is about is a sci-fi obsessed dude who spends most of his time alone inventing strange things and writing stories about ray guns or looking for aliens on Google maps. We made him a website. But that’s what the chords and sound effects were inspired by. Old sci-fi films/series. I also got a bit obsessed with Lollywood music (music from Pakistani films), and thats where the idea for the drums came from.

“Youth”
The idea for this one came from a story someone told me once. They were telling me about their child, and something awful had happened to them. She was crying—but at the same time the memories that they had from that previous life made her so happy—so she was also smiling. That combination of emotions kind of made me feel like my heart was being ripped apart but also optimistic in a weird way. She had found a way to see happiness in this awful thing that had happened to her. That combination of emotions is what this song is getting at. Have a look at this character’s website, too.

“Season 2 Episode 3”
Everyone knows someone like the character from this song. If you don’t, then it’s you. But there are lots of references to different psychedelic cartoons in this one—sonically and lyrically—including Adventure Time. That show is crazy.

“Pork Soda”
I heard a homeless man talking to someone once and say ‘pineapples are in my head.’ In retrospect, I’m pretty sure it wasn’t actually those words, but I thought it was at the time, and it kind of stuck with me. The opening of the song is meant to sound like you’re outside on the street, and you can hear a group of people chanting this song. The drum sounds are made from old bins and trash pieces of metal I found around the studio. Kind of like those street drummers use. All that is meant to set the scene for the story.

“Mama’s Gun”
I don’t use samples very often. I only like using them if they bring something to the table, aside from just music—a context and a further depth to the actual meaning of the song. This song is mainly about mental health, and I remembered this song by The Carpenters called “Mr. Guder.” It fit the atmosphere musically, while the song “Mr. Guder” itself was about an odd character of sorts, and then on top of that, Karen Carpenter’s story added another dimension to the lyrics. if you don’t know the story, you should look it up. It’s important and very sad, and it started a general social dialogue about mental illness which is to this day still a subject matter that we avoid far too much.

“Cane Shuga”
This is the only track on the record that didn’t start with lyrics and vocal melody. It started with the beat and the heavy drums. I let the beat spin and wrote stream of consciousness lyrics through a vocoder for this one to try to capture a certain mentality you might have when you’re a bit fucked up. When you start speaking what seems like gibberish—but maybe that gibberish is actually quite revealing.

”[Premade Sandwiches]”
This is a spoken word interlude. My favorite word in the album is in this: “McFuck.” It’s something that someone’s gotten at McDonald’s. Here it is used in a sentence: “What the McFuck are you eating?”

“The Other Side Of Paradise”
This is musically my favorite track on the record, I think. The chords are quite bizarre, and there are some mad arrangement and structural things going on. And the beat was super fun to make. It’s gonna be fun live!

“Take A Slice”
This track is about someone with a lot of lust. It’s as sleazy as I’ll ever get in lyrics. But everyone has that inside them somewhere, even if it’s only a tiny bit. And it comes out from time to time. For some people, it’s out all the time.

“Poplar St”
This song is meant to open with a kind of musical/lyrical image of a place. A little guitar hook and a floating vocal line that all seems quite peaceful, but things get more and more twisted as the song goes on. The guitar starts doing weirder things, the music builds tension, and then the whole thing flips on it’s head at the end. And you find that maybe that place isn’t what you first expected it was.

“Agnes”
As soon as I started writing it, I knew it would be the album closer. This is my favorite song on the record. And the saddest song I will ever write.

smileaboutit15  asked:

Can you list the shows and movies Katie has been in and tell me which are your favorites. I want to watch more of her stuff.

Hey there! You’ve come to the right place!

I’ll start with those that have yet to be released:

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword - Elsa (May 12, 2017)
Buttons - TBD (I do not believe the release date has been announced)

And for those that have been released, I’ll bold the ones with my favorite Katie characters/performances:

Supergirl - Lena Luthor (2016-)
Frontier - Elizabeth Carruthers (2016-)
Slasher - Sarah Bennett (2016)
Jurassic World - Zara Young (2015)
The Throwaways - Gloria Miller (2015)
Leading Lady - Jodi Rutherford (2014)
Dracula - Lucy Westenra (2013-2014)
Dates - Kate Foster (2013)

Labyrinth - Oriane Congost (2012)
Merlin - Morgana Pendragon (2008-2012)
Through the Storm ( Trid an Stoirm - Animated Short) - Alice/Banshee (2012)
A Princess for Christmas - Jules Daly (2011)
W.E. - Lady Thelma (2011)
The Queen - Princess Margaret (2009)
Freakdog - Harriet Chambers (2008)

Minor Roles (Single Episodes or Scenes)
The Tudors - Bess (2008)
Eden - Dessie’s Girlfriend (2008)
The Roaring Twenties - Vixen (2008)
Damage - Rachel (2008)

Depending on where you are located, a few of these can be found on Netflix. Here in the US, we have Frontier, Leading Lady, Slasher, and Merlin.

The Throwaways is available for free on Crackle.

Videos of her scenes from some of these can be found on youtube of course, but I recommend them in their entirety, especially for her larger roles.

I hope this helps!! 💗 Here’s the link to her IMDB as well.

(A table of contents is available. This series will remain open for additional posts and the table of contents up-to-date as new posts are added.)

Part Six: A Creature Who Is Also A Character

If you’ve read The Horse and His Boy from the Chronicles of Narnia series, you doubtless remember Breehy-hinny-brinny-hoohy-hah (or Bree for short, a lovely call-out from Lewis to Tolkien and The Prancing Pony in Bree). In fact, I don’t think you can read the book without remembering good ol’ Bree with his pride and his snarky comments and growing friendship with Hwin. Both the talking horses of the book are distinct. They have personalities that are easily identified and easily attributed to their experiences growing up. Bree became self-confident from years of captivity as a war horse among non-talking horses that seemed witless to him; by comparison, he was a genius, able to understand what his human riders commanded easier and faster than the other non-talking horses. Hwin, on the other hand, while also captured and raised among non-talking horses, is shy and more logical and reasonable as one of the stable horses for a noble house. These two are fantastic foils to each other throughout the story. But it’s easy to take two talking creatures and build them into full characters–they can tell you about their background and their experiences; they can throw out jokes and win hearts through glorious conversations. Think about other creature companions, though, ones like Hedwig who reveled in flying free and had an attitude sometimes, or the trusting, loving relationship that builds between Jakkin and Heart’s Blood the dragon in Jane Yolen’s The Pit Dragon series.

Each one of the most beloved, best remembered creature companions become favorites because of one thing: They are memorable characters. They have personalities and they are a part of who the main character is. Making sure your creature companions have personalities is an important step toward making your creature worth having. Just with extraneous characters who don’t fill any gap in the plot, creature companions must be put to work, too. To build that relationship both with the plot, the characters, and the audience, start with the small stuff: Who is this creature?

Who are they?

Starting at the very basics of personality, begin by asking yourself who this creature is. Where do they come from? Do they have family? What makes them happy or sad? Even if your creatures are regular animals or are mythical creatures that don’t have the power of speech, I still recommend knowing what makes the creature laugh. Maybe they don’t laugh like we do, but what makes them happy? How do they express that feeling?

Personality is as much expressed by behavior as it is by speech. Be sure you’re taking corresponding animal behaviors into account, including the bits combined to create your mythical creature. There’s a character in an old, old set of children’s books, Gink from Patricia Coombs’ Dorrie the Little Witch series. Gink is a black cat who follows the main character about, and while he has no lines, the cat appears in every picture of every book in the 20-book series. (Though Gink has no specified gender, my own cat Gink was male, so forgive me if I’m mildly biased.) Despite his silent role and few actions that are directly related in the plot (some! He does help from time to time!), Gink becomes an entire character of his own through his behind-the-scenes, background participation in the story with the audience. His curiosity, playfulness, and warnings–in short, his reactions–to Dorrie’s plights give the audience a distinct impression of who Gink is.

Think about when your creature will show affection and how, versus showing annoyance, anger, caution, hunger, and interest. What makes them curious? What will help them become more trusting and how does that trust manifest? What will always draw them in and what will they stay away from? 

What do they want?

It’s said every character, no matter how little screen-time they receive, should have a goal. Whether that’s getting a coffee or rescuing their family, everyone wants something. If you have a pet at home, you know it’s true even with them. Bruce Coville’s Into the Land of the Unicorns introduces Lightfoot, young unicorn prince whose ideals change as he accompanies the human Cara in her endeavors to save the world of Luster. He begins the tale wanting nothing more than to defy the fate his family has left him. He’s willing to leave every single one of them behind to do it, too, but by the end of the series, that desire has changed. As a character, he evolves, as all good characters should.

Be aware of why your creature is out there and why they’re willing to accompany your characters on whatever it is they’re up to. How does agreeing to do this help them get further toward their want? Maybe it’s just the security of knowing there are others to protect against dangers, or the promise of food at a regular pace, but it could also be their own quest to find something or someone, or even to save their homeland from certain destruction. Wants are small or large, but they must be present if you hope to build off of them and create real, natural, and effective actions for this creature to take.

What’s the worst thing they could face?

You’re going to put your characters through some Things™, and we all know it. Reactions cover a wide spectrum for all characters and your creatures will be no different, because, after all, we want them to be characters, too. So why not treat them that way when making them? You can’t know how broad their reactions will span until you’ve put some thought into the worst thing that could happen. This is more than just their worst fear. It branches into the idea of who they become when faced with difficult situations, as well. What could turn them not only into a cowering creature but also the worst version of themselves? What kinds of tactics would they be willing to engage in if things go horribly wrong? It helps you touch on morals when dealing with these creatures to whom you may not immediately ascribe the idea of having morals. Make them just as round as your real-life humanoid characters by making sure you know what they’re willing to do, how far they’ll go, and where the line is drawn in the metaphorical sand.

Long story short, your creatures are characters too! I can’t be alone in watching a couple of fish in a tank, pointing at one and saying, “That one’s got an attitude!” In a similar way, you should be paying attention to your creatures’ personalities–mainly that they have one. Remember that you don’t want them to be stock characters, so treat them like your other humanoid creatures when creating them. Without distinct personality, they cease to be companions and simply remain cardboard space fillers. They should be important! You want them to be memorable! Work on them like people and help to round them out.

Next up: Speech!

answering asks!

just picked 20 this time. ill open asks again next week

some of the questions i got were answered in the faq too! pls read that before sending questions, even if you think your question wont be there.. it probably is JKFLD;JFS

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Winter Anime Final Impressions

I was supposed to do this like two weeks ago but with Gundam ending so late and me getting swept up with many things, I didn’t have the time, but here’s a quick rundown of the best and worst of the Winter season. I’m gong from best to worst and also since I watched very few shows this season, I ‘m not gonna break them down in best/meh/worst

Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu: Sukeroku Futatabi-hen

A masterpiece to the very end, as heartbreaking as it was full of joy and love. There was this weird insinuation at the end that didn’t sit well with me at all and I’m not sure why they felt the need to do it, but I can overlook it because the rest of the picture is so wonderful and special and heart-wrenching. When Konatsu asked Yakumo to make her his apprentice, I actually cried. What a beautiful show. Don’t let the obscure antique Japanese art keep you from experiencing one of the best anime of this decade.

Ao no Exorcist: Kyoto-hen

I was a bit worried about this one because lately, when an “old” show gets a sequel many years after it last aired, said sequel turns out underwhelming and poorly done. See D.Grayman HALLOW (which also adapted my favorite arc from that manga) and Berserk (production values aside, the decline of this is due to Miura’s gross storytelling, so I guess it was inevitable). But I was more than surprised and ecstatic to see this rendition of the Kyoto arc did justice on the source material, with excellent production values, a good pace and wonderful emotional and action scenes alike. AoEx is one of the finest examples of the battle shonen genre and that translated wonderfully to this new iteration of the anime. I can only hope we’ll see Izumo’s and Shura’s arc eventually too.

ACCA-13-ku Kansatsuka

I was a Little on the fence on this one at the start, but once they laid down all the cards and tied all the loose threads, it became absolutely amazing. I’m sorry I ever doubted you Natsume Ono, your ability to craft smart and fascinating adult stories shall never be questioned again. Definitely worth checking out if you want to try something different to your usual anime genres. Helps that the visuals are really interesting and that Mauve is such a bae. I still feel Jean was the weakest link with his absolute nonchalance, but even that somehow worked at the end. Definitely worth going through the somewhat slow initial episodes.

Yowamushi Pedal: New Generation

NGL i’m not a fan of Kaburagi, he’s so much like Naruko I don’t feel he adds anything to the team. But this is now officially the Teshima show and that compensates for the snooze that is Kaburagi because Teshima has become so fabulous and cool I’m just excited every week to see what he’ll do next. Also the First-year race was a true highlight and I’m very disappointed Sugimoto didn’t make the cut, they did a fantastic job in making him likable, so it was sad to see him lose. Hopefully he’ll get to assist Imaizumi when they’re 3rd years.

Originally posted by animagamefan

Little Witch Academia

This show’s a lot of fun, with really sweet animation and it also sports the Best Girl of the season, Sucy Manbavaaran, although I gotta say there were a bit too many fillerish episodes and it was frustrating to see them take so long to get the plot going. I’m not hating on the show, it is in fact extremely entertaining, but it’s a little lacking on the plot department. Hopefully we’ll get more of that on the second cour.

Classicaloid

I’ve never been happier of not quitting a show as I am about Classicaloid. By episode 3 I was on the verge of giving up because it wasn’t what I had expected, but I kept going and I ended falling so hard in love with this show I’m ecstatic it’s getting a second season. Once I embraced the absurdity, it became the best comedy of the season, and I honestly would watch Schubert’s fishy misadventures for 52 weeks a year. It’s an acquired taste for sure and not easy to recommend, but if you’re willing to let go of all reason, you’re sure to have a good time.

Originally posted by mimimochi

All Out!!

I have a lot of love for this show and its characters (and Sekizan’s ridiculous hair), but I’m afraid the pacing they chose basically doomed them because with the abysmal sales, it seems unlikely we’ll ever see a second season and therefore we’ll never get to see if Jinko does get to Hanazono. It’s a perfectly competent sports series, that does a really good job of developing its huge cast, definitely much better than the likes of Prince of Stride or DAYS, but its inconclusive ending is quite frustrating. I really do hope we get to see more of these boys, but Madhouse’s never been all that good with the whole getting-sequels-done so…

Originally posted by dexicon

Kuzu no Honkai

In spite of its low ranking, this is actually a really good show and a unique take on teenage female sexuality that you wouldn’t normally see in this mostly sexist medium. Hanabi made for a truly interesting protagonist and I liked seeing her explore herself and her relationships. I was however quite disappointed by how little focus we actually had for Hanabi and Mugi’s relationship. I felt there was more telling than showing in that regard, especially in the latter half of the show. The ending was pretty good and mature in spite of everything, and as always, I’m just really fond of all the vaginal imagery in the ED animation. Could’ve done without Moca though.

Originally posted by jyoshikausei

Gundam: Tekketsu Orphans

At the end of the Fall season, I expressed my concern about pointless, meaningless deaths. Clearly the Gundam writers thought I wasn’t concerned enough because the amount of characters that died pointless deaths went on to, I think, the double digits. I wouldn’t have minded the carnage if there had been some sort of payoff to the sacrifices. For example, if Shino hadn’t stupidly and conveniently missed his one shot because the show couldn’t afford to kill Rustal yet. I always felt Orga, Mika and Akihiro had a ton of death flags looming over their heads, but I certainly didn’t expect all three of them to get to the chopping block. Orga’s death was particularly random and pointless, but then again, what they did with Orga in general was very confusing. That he agreed to McGillis’s sketchy propositions to become “king of Mars” never made a whole lot of sense to me and that’s the result we got. I’ll also never get over how creepy and weird the whole Atra giving Mika a baby thing was. In short, I have very mixed feelings about it.

Originally posted by shokugekis

Hand Shakers

I could write thousands of words for everything that was wrong with this series but I think it wouldn’t make justice to the absolute experience that is watching this amazing trainwreck. Go watch it to see a masterclass of how not to anime. Honestly I had such a good time hating this show, it was so horrible in every possible way. Good job GoHands, even animate, who sponsored this show, won’t give it any publicity.

Super Lovers

I’m not sure of how this production team managed to put out 20 episodes of nothing actually happen. Like you just have to give kudos to the writers for managing to simply not do anything over the course of 6~ hours of content. No drama, no decent comedy, no character development, not even relationship development in a BL romance. It’s kind of amazing how pointless the whole thing is. The dog’s still cute and the relationship is still creepy and gross and that’s about all there is to say about this.

Although most of the shows I watched turned out great, it did feel like a weaker season because there wasn’t that much that was interesting (my Wednesdays were literally empty). Or maybe everything looks lackluster in this post-Yuri on Ice world D: But there was Rakugo and rakugo is good and I’m glad we live in an age in which such a niche, quiet and adult artistic show could be made and tell a complete story.

ew.com
Inside the Super-Sized 'Glee' Reunion on 'The Flash'-'Supergirl' Musical Crossover
Good luck staying in your seat during this episode

Darren Criss is singing his heart out. Grant Gustin and Melissa Benoist are tap dancing. “It’s literally a Glee episode,” Gustin jokes. No, the Fox series hasn’t been revived. The trio are actually reuniting for the first time since their days on the Emmy-nominated hit series for a different kind of musical — and Criss may finally get his revenge. 

His Glee character, Blaine Anderson, received a slushy facial from Gustin’s Sebastian Smythe back in 2012, but now the tables have turned, with Criss assuming the mantle of the dastardly DC Comics villain Music Meister in the highly anticipated Flash/Supergirl musical crossover. “It is funny that the last time I worked with Grant, he was the bad guy and he was singing at me, and now I’m the bad guy singing at him,” Criss says. Though it’s a different set, with the quick turnaround and prep, Criss concurs that this all feels familiar. “It’s just Glee,” he says. 

In the March 21 episode of The Flash, Barry (Gustin) and Kara (Benoist) find themselves trapped in a movie musical of the Meister’s creation — an hour that has been years in the making. “We’ve always talked about doing it, from the very beginning, more in a joking way,” says executive producer Andrew Kreisberg. Gustin, however, was initially curious. “I didn’t ever think it would be a real thing, so when they told me it was real, I was like, ‘How?!‘” 

Here’s how: As the Scarlet Speedster and Girl of Steel experience turmoil in their interpersonal relationships, they’re whammied by the Music Meister, a less mustache-twirling, more manipulative villain who causes victims to break into song. The character was famously voiced by Neil Patrick Harris in the Batman: The Brave and the Bold animated series. “I have made a pretty decent career of only taking over roles as made famous by child stars,” jokes Criss, who also played the titular wizard in the Harry Potter musical. 

“I could not be happier that he’s here,” gushes Benoist, whose Glee character Marley Rose was mentored by Blaine. “He’s killing this role. He’s bringing such a fun energy, the way he did on Glee as well.”

Being fans of movie musicals as kids, the power-stripped heroes end up trapped in a golden-age send-up involving rival gangs and their kids falling in love — though expect many of the couples to come with a twist. The only way out? Follow the Meister’s script till the end. It may be a prison to them, but it’s heaven to Benoist. Noting she was born in the wrong era, the actress takes delight in the vintage ambience while sitting on a ’40s-era nightclub set. “Not that I don’t love the [Supergirl] suit, but it just feels good playing the same character in a completely different setting,” she says. “I’m eating this up.”

The Glee alums aren’t the only big names attached to the special episode. In a nod to Kara’s favorite film Wizard of Oz, everyone else in the vocally impressive cast is playing a character within this movie, from Jesse L. Martin, Victor Garber, and John Barrowman as rival mob bosses to Jeremy Jordan’s club pianist and Carlos Valdes’ aspiring artist busboy. Cherry-picking the movie musical genre — West Side Story, Singing in the Rain, and Guys and Dolls among the show’s inspirations — the hour also features some original songs, including “Runnin’ Home to You” from Oscar-winning La La Land duo Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, as well as the bubbly and playful Rachel Bloom co-penned tap duet “Super Friend.” “It’s a goofy song and it’s very consistent with that style of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” Gustin says. 

“We were approached by Rachel Bloom, who reached out to us and she really wanted to write a song for us,” Kreisberg explains. “And Greg [Berlanti] had a relationship with Pasek and Paul, so we sat down with them — we hadn’t even seen La La Land with them, but Greg had been such huge fans of theirs.” 

The episode also includes several covers, among them the Benoist solo “Moon River,” and an ensemble performance of Jackie DeShannon’s “Put a Little Love in Your Heart” that brings the denizens of the ’40s nightclub to their feet as the Meister conducts Jordan, Valdes, and John Barrowman in an epic, upbeat dance number choreographed by Glee’s Zachary Woodlee. “Some things are just star-crossed,” Valdes says of his two worlds — superheroes and musicals — colliding. “Some things are just destined and written in the stars. This felt like one of those instances where it was just something that was going to happen.” 

Jordan concurs: “Ever since they announced the cast of our show — plus the casts of Flash and other shows having so many musical theater people in them — it was only a matter of time before they harnessed those talents and made something into it.” 

All involved have unquestionable talents when it comes to singing, but Barrowman says the DeShannon piece doesn’t play to his strengths: “I’m exceptionally confident vocally, but they show me the dance steps and I’m not a hip-hopper, no way,” says Barrowman, who practices his moves on set between takes. “I panicked.” Still, Barrowman was determined to be involved once he learned of the crossover. “I hadn’t heard anything and I just basically then said, ‘I think you would be daft or stupid not to have me in this, really,‘” he says. “But they planned on it all along.” 

On the flip side, Gustin says he was excited about slipping back into his dance shoes. “More than anything else, my true foundation was tap dance,” the actor says. “It’s been cool to get back to it.” Adds Benoist: “It’s funny how things stay in your muscle memory. It was fun to pick it back up again and see your body and be like, ‘Oh, we remember how to do this.'” 

With everyone in one room, Barrowman admits, “I’m a bit fan-boying out to be honest,” explaining that he watched his castmates’ former projects Glee and Smash. “What a nerd,” Jordan responds upon hearing the news. “He plays it super cool backstage, so you wouldn’t know he was geeking out.”  

Beyond Glee, the hour marks an even bigger reunion as Gustin and Supergirl‘s Chris Wood — who, along with co-star David Harewood, will guest in the crossover, but not sing — went to school together, while Criss counts Valdes, Pasek, and Paul as classmates. “It’s been a very sentimental crossover on so many levels,” Criss says. “Every day, every scene my mind is being blown. I can’t believe I’m here with Melissa Benoist and Carlos Valdes. ‘How do you guys even know each other? Oh, that’s right, you’re both superheroes!'” 

Fun fact: Another classmate of theirs, Andy Mientus, also previously played a villain on The Flash, with Criss joking it’s about damn time he appeared in the Berlanti-verse. “I was wondering why everybody else I knew had been on the show but me,” Criss says with a laugh. In truth, Kreisberg says Criss was destined to play this role. “Darren so brings him to life,” the EP says. “I’m not sure who we would have gotten to do it if Darren had said no, but it turned out to be one of those things where we wanted Darren and Darren actually wanted the part. It was very kismet.” 

Should the crossover prove successful, Kreisberg even has hopes for a sequel, and Criss would be elated to return to the wild, wild world of singing superheroes. “I would have liked to have written some songs,” quips the actor and musician, who landed the role too late in the process to do so. “I want to come back, I’m not done — then I’ll have my true payback!” Watch out, Flash! 

The musical crossover will kick off at the end of Supergirl‘s March 20 hour, with the majority of the action taking place during The Flash‘s March 21 episode, both airing at 8 p.m. ET on The CW.

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lmao like the only time i EVER see hard disney fans even mention ghibli and miyazaki in comparison to disney films is in light of disney’s own mistakes and laziness like damn y’all need to calm down

lemme teach you a lil’ somethin’ somethin’ about stylistic choices in animation and sheer laziness

STYLISTIC choices is about having the full capability of creating characters separate from the previous protagonists while at the same time tying them to the studio that produced them.

And that’s not even scratching the surface.

Considering that a good portion of Ghibli’s library consists of LEAD FEMALE PROTAGONISTS who are usually very young, they need to find a set balance between recognizable and unique.

Ghibli was founded on traditional art and the studio still holds many of those values with it. This is of course including hand-drawn animation in which there is no single model, only the same character drawn over and over again. Is this about CGI vs traditional? No, both can and have provided beautiful films and scenes but it’s not about which one deserves more recognition. It’s about the methods used and how the choices for each one vary. I only bring up the animation methods because it’s part of the reason as to WHY these characters are so simplistic in design.

Still though, they need each lead character to stick to the Ghibli/Miyazaki style to a certain extent. They need to share certain qualities to make them fall in line with the rest of Ghibli’s library.

I mean, they have their differences but they’re obviously Ghibli characters so okay they all have relatively small eyebrows (though considering that they are Japanese that ties in with their ethnicity but OKAY moving on), they all have the eye highlight thing going on, and they all have very non-pronounced noses. I suppose yeah those are all the same. They do shift but those characteristics are roughly the same.

Still though, that isn’t a problem nor is it blatant same-facing. All LAIKA characters have skewed noses, all Dreamworks characters have thin noses, and all Aardman characters have bulgy eyes. Does that mean they’re same-facing? No. It means they’re sticking to stylistic choices to keep themselves separate from the competition.

Don Bluth MADE the choice to stick to a style closely resembling Disney. You know what happened? A whole generation grew up thinking that Anastasia and Thumbelina were both DISNEY films, not Bluth and Fox animation.

There’s a reason why studios tend to go for their own set style.

But hey! Want even more evidence that it’s a stylistic choice?

Because THE VERY SAME CHOICES CAN BE SAID FOR THE DUDES

Save for Haku because he’s a fuckin’ dragon.

While gender is never really brought up in Ghibli films, masculinity and femininity are both neutral here, it’s safe to say that their designs and treatment are both equal. Ghibli isn’t out to make exclusively beautiful/handsome characters, they make them as simple as possible to keep them relatable and much more easier to manage.

The difference here is that Disney has always set out to make their MALES different while sticking their females to the same “doe eyed, small nose, thin lips” ideal. Yes, there is a set Disney style and it has always focused on those features and that necessarily isn’t a bad thing. It’s the Disney style. HOWEVER it seems to only apply to their females. Even worse is their marketing of said females.

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GOTTA KEEP THEM GURLS PURTY

The Disney style has shifted from time to time and it shows evidence that it CAN include more diverse female designs. Both Kida and Calhoun are wonderful examples of this. It’s not as if Disney hasn’t evolved or changed their views on female characters to a certain extent. Unfortunately, said shifts haven’t always worked out in our favor or headed in the right direction. It wasn’t until Tangled that Disney came out with it’s true “get richer quicker” scheme with their female leads.

watch as i shift into MAXIMUM PUNZEL-DRIVE

As of late it’s Disney’s sheer laziness when it comes to female design and their own avarice that has caused SUUUUCH a dramatic shift in how fans are taking the Disney style now. When Ghibli audiences and fans never look at a new movie and go “oh it’s Chihiro but tiny” or “oh it’s Chihiro but on a broom.” That is the set style, not a lazy copy-paste.

But hey, let’s bring in OTHER females to see how this works out. I mean, the Ghibli style is prevalent to ALL of their characters so surely they all the parents look exactly like their children.

Let’s look at these lovely lady leads and compare them to their parents.

Congrats, kids, you’re all adopted!

WEIRDLY ENOUGH all of the characters and their parents (if they have any) share same characteristics while at the same time remaining completely unique to each other. It’s almost as if they also take after their father and/or previous generations of their familly. Haha, genetics!

But okay, let’s be a little more fair with Disney.

Let’s look at two families with two daughters.

Mitosis or go home

There is having stylistic choices and there is being lazy.

There is creating a character with similarities to their parent and there is making a recolor of your lead character.

There is creating simple designs for a traditionally animated film and there is reusing the same model because it worked so well the first time.

There is being a small Tokyo-based studio with 300 employees and there is being a large American animation studio with 800+ employees.

THAT is why no one ever complains about Ghibli’s approach to character design and THAT is why Disney doesn’t even come close to Miyazaki.

Let’s finish this off with some MORE wonderful Ghibli characters (most of which being my personal favorites so they belong on here too.)

Now go watch more Ghibli.

esquire.com
Chris Evans Has No Interest in Walking on Eggshells

CHRIS EVANS IS READY TO FIGHT

His success as Captain America has made Chris Evans one of Hollywood’s sure things, which means he can do whatever he wants with his free time. So why jump out of airplanes and get into it with David Duke?

The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, “Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

While we were waiting to board the plane, Evans told me that as he lay in bed the night before, “I started exploring the sensation of ‘What if the chute doesn’t open?’. . .”

Oh, did you now?

“. . .Those last minutes where you know.” As in you know you’re going to fatally splat. “You’re not gonna pass out; you’re gonna be wide awake. So what? Do I close my eyes? Hopefully, it would be quick. Lights out. I fucking hope it would be quick. And then I was like, if you’re gonna do it, let’s just pretend there is no way this is going to go wrong. Just really embrace it and jump out of that plane with gusto.” Evans also shared that he’d looked up the rate of skydiving fatalities. “It’s, like, 0.006 fatalities per one thousand jumps. So I figure our odds are pretty good.”

Again the crew member shouts, “Who’s going first?”

Again I look at Evans; again he looks at me. The rat is running circles in my belly.

I look at Evans; he looks at me.

Another crew member asks, “So whose idea was this, anyway?”


That’s an excellent question.

I ask Evans the same thing when we first meet, the evening before our jump, at his house. He lives atop the Hollywood Hills, in a modern-contemporary ranch in the center of a Japanese-style garden. The place has the vibe of an L.A. meditation retreat—there’s even a little Buddha statue on the front step.

The dude who opens the front door is in jeans, a T-shirt, and Nikes; he has on a black ball cap with the NASA logo, and his beard is substantial enough that for a second it’s hard to be sure this is the same guy who plays the baby-faced superhero. Our handshake in the doorway is interrupted when his dog rockets toward my crotch. Evans is sorry about that.

We do the small-talk thing. Evans is from a suburb of Boston, one of four kids raised by Dad, a dentist, and Mom, who ran a community theater. The point is, he’s a Patriots fan, and with Super Bowl LI, between the Pats and the Falcons, just a few days away at the time, it’s about the only thing on his mind. You bet your Sam Adams–guzzling ass he’s going to the game in Houston. “Oh my God,” he says, doing a little dance. “I can’t believe it’s this weekend.”

Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

Evans won’t be rolling to SB LI with a posse of Beantown-to-Hollywood A-listers like Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon, and Ben Affleck. For the record, he’s never met Damon, and his only interaction with Wahlberg was a couple years ago at a Patriots event. Evans has, however, humiliated himself in front of Affleck.

Around 2006, Evans met with Affleck to talk about Gone Baby Gone, which Affleck was directing. Evans was walking down a hallway, looking for the room where they were supposed to meet. Walking by an open office, he heard Affleck, in that thick Boston accent of his, shout, “There he is!” (Evans does a perfect Affleck impersonation.)

By then, Evans had hit the big time for his turn as the Human Torch, Johnny Storm, in 2005’s Fantastic Four, but he still got starstruck. As he tells it, “First thing I say to him: 'Am I going to be okay where I parked?’ He was like, 'Where did you park?’ I said, 'At a meter.’ And he was like, 'Did you put money in the meter?’ And I said, 'Yep.’ And he says, 'Well, I think you’ll be okay.’ I was like, this is off to a great fucking start.” Stating the obvious here: Evans did not get the part.

No, Evans will be heading to the Super Bowl with his brother and three of his closest buddies. Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for imposing that suspension on Tom Brady for Deflategate. Grabbing two beers from a fridge that’s otherwise basically empty, Evans says, “I just want to see Goodell hand the trophy to Brady. Goodell. Piece of shit.”

In Evans’s living room, there’s not a single hint of his Captain Americaness. Earth tones, tables that appear to be made of reclaimed wood. Open. Uncluttered. Glass doors open onto a backyard with a stunning view of the Hills. Evans stretches out on one of two couches. I take the other and ask, “Just whose idea was it to jump?” Since we both know whose idea it wasn’t, we both know that what I’m really asking is Why? Why, dude, do you want to jump (with me) from a goddamn airplane? “Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Settling in on the couch, he groans. Evans explains that he’s hurting all over because he just started his workout routine the day before to get in shape for the next two Captain America films. The movies will be shot back to back beginning in April. After that, no more red- white-and-blue costume for the thirty-five-year-old. He will have fulfilled his contract.

“Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Back in 2010, Marvel presented Evans with a nine-picture deal. He insisted he’d sign on for no more than six. Some family members thought he was nuts to dial back such a secure and lucrative gig. Evans saw it differently.

It takes five months to shoot a Marvel movie, and when you tack on the promotional obligations for each one, well, shit, man. Evans knew that for as long as he was bound to Captain America, he would have little time to take on other projects. He wanted to direct, he wanted to play other characters—roles that were more human—like the lead in Gifted, which will hit theaters this month. The script had brought him to tears. Evans managed to squeeze the movie in between Captain America and Avengers films.

In Gifted, Evans stars as Frank Adler. You don’t get much more human than Adler, a grease-under-his-nails boat-engine mechanic living the bachelor life in Florida. After a series of tragic circumstances, Adler becomes a surrogate father to his niece, Mary, a first-grader with the IQ of Einstein. He recognizes that Mary is a little genius, and he does his best to prevent anyone else from noticing. Given the aforementioned circumstances, Adler has witnessed what can happen when a kid with a brilliant mind is pushed too hard too quickly. Then along comes Mary’s teacher. She discovers the child’s gift, and a Kramer vs. Kramer–esque drama ensues.

During a moment in the film when things aren’t going Adler’s way, he sarcastically refers to himself as a “fucking hero.” Evans says the line didn’t lead him to make comparisons between superhero Steve Rogers (aka Captain America) and Everyman hero Frank Adler. But now that you mention it . . . 

“With Steve Rogers,” Evans says, “even though you’re on a giant movie with a huge budget and strange costumes, you’re still on a hunt for the truth of the character.” That said, “with Adler, it’s nice to play someone relatable. I think Julianne Moore said, 'The audience doesn’t come to see you; they come to see themselves.’ Adler is someone you can hold up as a mirror for someone in the audience. They’ll be able to far more easily identify with Frank Adler than Steve Rogers.”


Dodger. That’s the name of Evans’s dog, the one who headbutted my nuts and has since done a marvelous job of making amends by nuzzling against me on the couch. Evans got him while he was filming Gifted; one of the last scenes was shot in an animal shelter in Georgia. Evans had wanted a dog ever since his last pooch died in 2012. Then he found himself walking the aisles of this pound, and there was this mixed-breed boxer, wagging his tail and looking like he belonged with Evans.

Dodger is not exactly a name you’d think a die-hard Boston sports fan would pick. His boys from back home have given him a ton of shit over it. But he has not abandoned his Red Sox for the L.A. team. As a kid, he loved the Disney animated movie Oliver & Company, and his favorite character was Dodger. Anticipating the grief he was going to get from his pals, Evans considered other names. “You could name your dog Doorknob,” he says, “and in a month he’s fucking Doorknob.” Evans’s mom convinced him to go with his gut.

Right around when Evans was wrapping Gifted and heading back to L.A. with Dodger, the 2016 presidential campaign was still in that phase when no one, including the actor—a Hillary Clinton supporter—thought Trump had a shot. He still can’t believe Trump won.

“I feel rage,” he says. “I feel fury. It’s unbelievable. People were just so desperate to hear someone say that someone is to blame. They were just so happy to hear that someone was angry. Hear someone say that Washington sucks. They just want something new without actually understanding. I mean, guys like Steve Bannon—Steve Bannon!—this man has no place in politics.”

Evans has made, and continues to make, his political views known on Twitter. He tweeted that Trump ought to “stop energizing lies,” and he recently ended up in a heated Twitter debate with former KKK leader David Duke over Trump’s pick of Jeff Sessions for attorney general. Duke baselessly accused Evans of being anti-Semitic; Evans encouraged Duke to try love: “It’s stronger than hate. It unites us. I promise it’s in you under the anger and fear.” Making political statements and engaging in such public exchanges is a rather risky thing for the star of Captain America to do. Yes, advisors have said as much to him. “Look, I’m in a business where you’ve got to sell tickets,” he says. “But, my God, I would not be able to look at myself in the mirror if I felt strongly about something and didn’t speak up. I think it’s about how you speak up. We’re allowed to disagree. If I state my case and people don’t want to go see my movies as a result, I’m okay with that.”

Trump. Bannon. Politics. Now Evans is animated. He gets off the couch, walks out onto his porch, and lights a cigarette. “Some people say, 'Don’t you see what’s happening? It’s time to yell,' ” Evans says. “Yeah, I see it, and it’s time for calm. Because not everyone who voted for Trump is going to be some horrible bigot. There are a lot of people in that middle; those are the people you can’t lose your credibility with. If you’re trying to change minds, by spewing too much rhetoric you can easily become white noise.”


Evans has a pretty remarkable “How I got to Hollywood” story.

During his junior year of high school, he knew he wanted to act. He was doing it a lot. In school. At his mom’s theater. He loved it. “When you’re doing a play at thirteen years old and have opening night? None of my friends had opening nights. 'I can’t have a sleepover, guys; I have an opening night tonight.' ”

That same year, he did a two-man play. For all of the twenty-plus plays Evans had done up to that point, preparation meant going home, memorizing lines, and doing a few run-throughs with the cast. However, for this play, Fallen Star, he and his costar would rehearse by running dialogue with each other. Hour upon hour, night after night.

Fallen Star is about two friends, one of whom has just died. As the play opens, one of the characters comes home after the funeral to find his dead friend’s ghost. Evans was the ghost. Waiting backstage on opening night, he knew he didn’t have every line memorized, but he had the essence and emotion of the play down. Onstage, he remembers, “I was saying the lines not because they were memorized but because the play was in me. I was believing what I was saying.”

He was hooked. He wanted to do more of this kind of acting—real acting. He wanted to do films, in which the camera was right on him and he could just be the character, rather than theater, in which an actor must perform to the back of the room.

A family friend who was a television actor advised Evans that if he wanted to go to Hollywood, he needed an agent. Toward the end of his junior year, he had a ballsy request for his parents: If he found an internship with a casting agent in New York City, would they allow him to live there and cover the rent? They agreed. Evans landed a gig with Bonnie Finnegan, who was then working on the television show Spin City.

“I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

Evans chose to intern with a casting agent because he figured he had more of a chance to interact with other agents trying to get auditions for their clients.

The kid was sixteen years old.

Finnegan put Evans on the phone; his responsibilities included setting up appointments for auditions. By the end of the summer, he picked the three agents he had the best rapport with and asked each of them to give him a five-minute audition. All three said yes. After seeing his audition, all three were interested.

Evans went with the one Finnegan recommended, Bret Adams, who told Evans to return to New York for auditions in January, television pilot season. Back home, Evans doubled up on a few classes the first semester of his senior year, graduated early, and went back to New York in January. He got the same shithole apartment in Brooklyn and the same internship with Finnegan. He landed a part on the pilot Opposite Sex. Even better, the show got picked up and would start shooting in L.A. that fall.

“I know I’m going to L.A. in August,” Evans says, recalling that period. “So I go home and that spring I would wake up around noon, saunter into high school just to see my buddies, and we’d go get high in the parking lot. I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

He wasn’t in L.A. for even a month when he got a call from home. His parents were divorcing. Evans never saw it coming.

Family and love and the struggles therein are part of what attracted Evans to Gifted.

“In my own life, I have a deep connection with my family and the value of those bonds,” he says. “I’ve always loved stories about people who put their families before themselves. It’s such a noble endeavor. You can’t choose your family, as opposed to friends. Especially in L.A. You really get to see how friendships are put to the test; it stirs everyone’s egos. But if something goes south with a friend, you have the option to say we’re not friends anymore. Your family—that’s your family. Trying to make that system work and trying to make it not just functional but actually enjoyable is a really challenging endeavor, and that’s certainly how it is with my family.”


In the plane, a decision is made.

“I want to see you jump first,” Evans shouts my way.

Of course he does.

Like any respectable and legal skydiving center, Skydive Perris, which is providing us with this “experience,” doesn’t just strap a chute on your back. First, you go to a room for a period of instruction. Then you go to another room, where you sign away your rights.

You may be wondering how the star of a billion-dollar franchise with two pictures to shoot gets clearance to jump from an airplane—never mind the low rate of fatalities, as Evans has presented it. So am I.

“Well, they give you all these crazy insurance policies, but even if I die, what are they going to do? Sue my family? They’d probably cast some new guy at a cheaper price and save some money.”

Thinking the answer is almost certainly going to be no, I ask Evans if he’s ever gone skydiving before. Turns out he has, with an ex-girlfriend. Turns out that ex-girlfriend is now married to Justin Timberlake. Evans and Jessica Biel dated off and on from 2001 to 2006. They took the leap together when Biel hatched the idea for one Valentine’s Day. According to media accounts, Evans was recently dating his Gifted costar Jenny Slate, who plays the teacher. “Yeah,” he says, “but I’m steering clear of those questions.” You can almost feel his heart pinch.

There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around.”

We end up broadly discussing the unique challenges an international star like Evans faces when it comes to dating, specifically the trust factor. Evans supposes that’s why so many actors date other actors: “There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around,” he says. “Letting someone go to work with someone for three months and they won’t see them. It really, it certainly puts the relationship to the test.”

In Gifted, there’s a moment when Slate’s character asks Adler what his greatest fear is. Frank Adler’s greatest fear is that he’ll ruin his niece’s life. Evans’s greatest fear is having regrets.

“Like always kind of wanting to be there as opposed to here. I think I’m worried all of a sudden I’ll get old and have regrets, realize that I’ve not cultivated enough of an appreciation for the now and surrendering to the present moment.”

Evans’s musings have something to do with the fact that he has been reading The Surrender Experiment. “It’s about the basic notion that we are only in a good mood when things are going our way,” he says. “The truth is, life is going to unfold as it’s going to unfold regardless of your input. If you are an active participant in that awareness, life kind of washes over you, good or bad. You kind of become Teflon a little bit to the struggles that we self-inflict.”

He continues: “Our conscious minds are very spread out. We worry about the past. We worry about the future. We label. And all of that stuff just makes us very separate. What I’m trying to do is just quiet it down. Put that brain down from time to time and hope those periods of quiet and stillness get longer. When you do that, what rises from the mist is a kind of surrendering. You’re more connected as opposed to being separate. A lot of the questions about destiny or fate or purpose or any of that stuff—it’s not like you get answers. You just realize you didn’t need the questions.”

This here—this stuff about surrendering, letting life unfold, taking the leap—this is why he wanted to go skydiving. It’s why that sixteen-year-old took the leap and did the summer in New York; it’s why he took the leap and turned down the nine-picture deal; it’s why he got Dodger. Surrender. Take the leap.

And so I go first.

Oh, one important detail: Novice jumpers like Evans and me, we don’t jump solo. Thank God. Each of us is doing a tandem jump. Each of us is strapped with our back to a professional jumper’s front. I’m strapped to a forty-four-year-old dude named Paul. Considering what’s about to happen, I figure I should know a little something about Paul. He tells me he used to own a bar in Chicago. Evans is strapped to a young woman named Sam, who looks to be twenty-something. She’s got a purplish-pink streak in her black hair and says things like “badass.” In fact, Sam introduced herself  by saying, “I’m Sam, but you can call me Badass.”

At the plane’s open door, my mind goes to my wife and two teenage sons, to those I love, and to the texts I just sent in case my chute fails. Then Paul and I—well, really mostly Paul—rock gently back and forth to build momentum to push away from the plane, to push away from all that seems sane.

Three.

Two.

One.

Holy fuck.

HOLY FUCK. This is what I scream as we free-fall from 12,500 feet, at more than a hundred miles an hour, toward the earth. Which I cannot take my eyes off of. I think about nothing. Not living. Not dying. Nothing. I simply feel . . . I have let go.

Suddenly, it all stops. I’m jerked up. Paul has pulled the chute, and it does indeed open. This is fantastic, because it means we have a much better chance of not dying. But it’s also kind of a bummer. I had let go. Of everything. I had chosen to play those odds Evans had talked about. I had embraced jumping and letting life unfold.

Now I had been jerked back. I would land. Back on the earth I had been so high above and from which I had been so far removed. Back in all of it.

Once I’m on the ground, safe and in one piece, a staffer runs over and asks how I feel. I say, “I feel like Captain America.”

The staffer runs over and asks Evans the same question. He says he feels great. Then he’s asked another question: What was your favorite part?

“Jumping out,” he says. “Jumping out is always a real thrill.”


My Life As A Teenage Robot: My Thoughts and Why This Show Needs A Reboot!

So today is a very special post in my opinion! 

Recently, I believe a week ago, I rediscovered one of my favorite shows that I used to watch when I was little! 

That show… well you already know because of the title of my post! LOL!

So yeah, I am now part of this fandom! 

So I remember so much about this show!!! 

I remember XJ9! AKA, Jenny! 

I also remember all of the beautiful designs of the whole setting, and of course the weapon designs! 

I remember the level of awesomeness and fun that this show has!

This show, in my opinion, is basically a Superman type of story. 

A creature that is either from a different world or a creature that is built to defend the human race, is now part of human life, and gets to discover what humans are actually like. 

So that is really interesting and it also makes the main lead very relatable and likable.

So before this post, I researched this show again and watched some old episodes. I even watched the video “107 Facts ‘My Life As A Teenage Robot’ That You Should Know About.”

So… what do I think about the show?

Well, it’s really really good! 

So what is so good about this show you may ask?

Well, lets list my reasons why! 

1. The beautiful 2D hand drawn animation! 

2. The character designs are very unique and creative! 

3. The characters are funny, likable, and relatable! 

4. The action scenes are fun! 

5. The settings are unique and creative! 

6. And the story about a robot girl who wants to be a regular teenager is very intriguing and interesting! 

It’s just really interesting, and Rob Renzetti, the creator of the show, wanted this show to continue! 

But unfortunately, that never happened. 

Because according to wikipedia and tvtropes, it was cancelled by Nickelodeon due to low ratings from season 2. 

Season 2 ended in 2005 and season 3 never aired until 2008! 

And the finale of the show didn’t really feel like a finale. It just felt like a random episode that could’ve been put in any other episodes, not the series finale!

I wish it continued!!! 

It’s such a very cool concept and it can be rebooted today! 

And before I tell you more reasons why, I wanna tell you something about one particular ship that I am loving for this show!

And Jenny is one of my many fictional character crushes!!! 

So what is the ship?

Sheldon X Jenny!

So this kid above is Sheldon Oswald Lee.

He is the main supporting character of the series.

He is friends with Jenny and he has a huge crush on her throughout the whole show! 

He at times would fall under the geeky kid who stalks the main female character trope. 

Well he does that, but only for a few episodes.

Everything other than that, he is a very nice and sweet guy towards Jenny! 

He is cute, funny, likable, and just a very fun character! 

And the show was short lived and we the fans never saw them being a couple. 

Turns out, according to the wikipedia page, the creator himself have stated that if the show lasted longer, the two would’ve been a couple! 

THAT IS WHAT I WANT TO SEE IF IT EVER GETS A REBOOT!!! 

This reboot can have better animation and there can be new stories! 

I would recommend this show being on Disney XD!

With its lineup of great shows like Star vs. The Forces of Evil, Gravity Falls, Wander Over Yonder, and the upcoming DuckTales reboot, this reboot can be added to this channel as one of the great animated shows of the modern era! 

That’s my take! 

Comment about your thoughts! 

@rsn2000 @elijah-dawg-one @dr-dylex @briam516 @eclecticcoyote @glitter-and-death @kandeekorn @marvelandponder @skeletonguys-and-ragdolls @renegade-timel0rd

Girls Need Heroes, Too: In Defense of Magical Girls

Of all the different types of anime, the magical girl anime is probably the sub-genre that is most looked down upon. Magical girl animes are bright and colorful, they always involve middle- or junior-school-aged girls gaining superpowers and having dramatic transformation scenes, and there’s plenty of fan service in terms of skimpy outfits and simpering looks.

Originally posted by thedragoon

People, even the more open-minded anime watchers, have a tendency to dismiss magical girl animes due to what they perceive as a standard storyline and stock characterization; they’re blinded by the plethora of pink, the frills and short skirts, and the girlish laughter, and they miss the more serious and frequently dark side of these shows.

Originally posted by kagenui

Like any television show, anime or otherwise, magical girl animes have stories and messages that are both entertaining and relevant. Few shows have as much optimism and determination as magical girl animes, yet these shows also provide a realistic (at least as realistic as you can get on shows where girls are granted magical powers to fight the forces of evil) look at the sacrifices and pain that heroes must face. Magical girl animes are able to blend important lessons with joy and levity, and there are a number of reasons that they’re worth watching.

One of my favorite things about magical girl animes is the way they portray friendship. Even if a magical girl starts out on her own, it’s inevitable that she’ll end up surrounded by a team of other magical girls and occasionally a token magical boy. Like any story involving teamwork, there’s going to be some conflicts and some drama, but ultimately, it’s the strength of the team and their friendship that helps them save the day.

Originally posted by ladyofacat

Originally posted by fyeahsailormoon

Magical girls don’t always start off as friends-in fact, they sometimes start off as annoyances at best and flat-out adversaries at worst-but there are few things that bring people together quite as well as having to save people (or the city or the earth or the universe or all of space and time; you get the idea).  

Originally posted by sylneon

Originally posted by chatnoirs-baton

But despite the task of working together to save the day, the friendships in magical girl animes are always realistic. As I said, magical girls don’t always get along with one another. Becoming a magical girl is rarely a choice; it’s typically the result of some outside circumstance such as a perceived aptitude for being a hero, an accident, or a grand destiny, and as a result, the chosen girls are very different types of people with different personalities, motives, and attitudes towards their new role.

Originally posted by madokamagicaruinedmylife

Originally posted by densetsu-sailor-moon

The resulting clashes are typically the direct result of these differences, yet as the girls work more and more as a team, these conflicts become less and less common. It’s hard to rely on someone to have your back without forming some sort of more personal bond, and eventually, even those magical girls who would rather work alone find themselves forming friendships with their fellow magical girls. There are still plenty of ups and downs, but that’s true of any friendship, magical or otherwise, and these shows aren’t afraid of portraying the good times along with the bad, giving viewers a well-rounded look at the personal relationship of magical girls. Yes, there may be more makeovers or shopping trips or sleepovers than other animes, but these types of scenes go to show that magical girls and other heroes have lives outside of saving the day, and they enjoy the time they have with their friends doing things they enjoy.

Originally posted by checkyesbraixen

Originally posted by theonewhohelptosetthesun

Originally posted by homurahyakuya

Originally posted by heartcoma

But that doesn’t mean these magical girls don’t enjoy kicking some bad guy butt. They’ve got superpowers and awesome weapons and they know how to use them. Magical girl animes are really at the top of the list in terms of girl power. These ladies can fight, they can strategize and plan, they can work as a team and take down any villain or monster that stands in their way, and they look cute while doing it.

Originally posted by weissrose

Originally posted by psychopass

Originally posted by nicorobin

In the world of superheroes, there are infinitely more men than women, leaving young girls at a bit of a loss in terms of role models. Magical girls provide female heroes for people to look up to and admire. Magical girls fight for a cause, they don’t compromise their values, and they’re willing to sacrifice themselves to save others. They’re just as capable and worthy of admiration as any guy hero, yet they’re often brushed aside because of their girlishness.

Originally posted by nenecchi

Originally posted by rusianmio

Originally posted by httptsunderethighs

Which is really a shame, because these magical girls are proof that you can be girly and still totally kick butt. Whether it’s straight-up physical combat, mastery of weapons-everything from guns to swords to archery to a yoyo- or actual magical powers such as control over an element, these ladies are fearsome and powerful. 

Originally posted by ladynoir-aka-life

Originally posted by anime

Originally posted by every-rabbit-is-trans

But sometimes they’re powerful enough to hurt more than they help, particularly when it comes to getting hurt themselves. Magical girls sometimes find themselves in situations that their weapons and skills can’t overcome, and they must sacrifice some part of themselves, be it their magical girl status, a physical ability, or their humanity itself. These are frightening and painful decisions to make, yet magical girls never seem to back down from making them. They know what has to be done, and they’re willing to do whatever it takes to save the day. 

Originally posted by panzoom

Originally posted by asami-snazz

Originally posted by sirens-coven

Originally posted by homuraholic

Originally posted by rito2ru

Originally posted by yazzydream

Knowing that being a magical girl of any kind would have its downsides might deter some from accepting such a role, but those who do become magical girls always do so because they believe in what being a magical girl embodies. Even more, they have hope that their sacrifices and pain will make the world a better place. No matter how dark things may get, it seems like magical girls have an ability for endless hopefulness: hope that evil can be overcome, hope that people can change, hope that their choice to do the right thing will be enough.

Their hope is not always realistic and it’s not always rewarded, yet their unfailing willingness to hope for something better even when all seems lost is admirable. Just seeing magical girls pushing back against their enemies no matter what makes viewers believe that their own problems can be overcome. Even when everything seems to be falling apart, there’s hope that tomorrow will be better, and people have a tendency to forget that. Luckily we have characters like magical girls to remind us to be hopeful and to do whatever we can to bring hope to others.

Magical girl animes truly have a lot to offer everyone. There are complex characters, twisted and dramatic storylines, and epic fight scenes. Many of the shows have fantastic animation as well, along with great scores and visually-stunning transformation sequences.

Originally posted by mysweet-milkshake

Originally posted by purple-link-pone

Originally posted by lightgeline

Critics aren’t wrong when they say magical girl animes are usually fluffier and more lighthearted than other animes or other animated shows, but that’s not what makes these animes so good. These fluffy moments provide a brief respite between the truly hard choices, the sacrifices and the losses.

Magical girl animes show that girls can be just as good as the boys. They can be just as tough, just as powerful, just as heroic. And they can do it all while wearing a combat skirt and heels, something I’d love to see their male counterparts attempt. Magical girls and magical girl animes deserve the same acknowledgment and appreciation as their contemporaries for being unabashedly what they are: celebrations of the great things girls can do with hope, determination, and a bit of magic.

Originally posted by unicorns-ate-my-memories

Winterhawk Mini Bang

Here it is folks all the works from the minibang! All the fics have art accompanying them. Take a look through these works and give the authors and artists some love. Please remember to check the archive warnings and be sure to read all the tags before you start reading.

Standby (T) Words: 2,387 by @mollynoble

Tags: AU - Modern Setting, Veteran Bucky, Veteran Clint, brief mention - anxitey

Clint and Bucky meet when they become trapped in an elevator. Clint is an idiot, but Bucky likes him anyways.

[Art] by @torii-storii

birdboy and grumpycat17 (T) Words: 2,020 by @varilia

Tags: Friends to Lovers, Interplanetary Travel, “The Space Between Us” AU

Clint was born on Mars. Only, like, two people on Earth know that, and his best– only– friend, James, is not one of them. When given the opportunity to visit Earth, and therefore James, Clint is eager to tell James the truth: about where he’s from, and the fluttery feelings that he gets whenever talking to James.

[Art] by @sian1359

Americana is for Lovers (M) Words: 8,232 by @ccbytheseashore

Tags: road trips, americana, sexual content, developing relationships, getting together

Please tell me you are still alive, read Steve’s text.
In Virginia, Bucky replied.
The hell are you doing in Virginia?
Would you believe me if I said trying to find a foam sculpture of Stonehenge?
Tony said to make sure his car comes back in once piece. Please don’t shoot each other.

Clint and Bucky set off on an adventure to find an infamous work of Americana history, but find literally everything else (including love, and a Magic Fingers) instead.

[Art] by @bvckyboy

My Depths for You (M) Words: 7,287 by @shellsxo

Tags: Domestic Fluff; Domestic!Bucky; Domestic!Clint; Anniversary

Somewhere down the line, Bucky Barnes had become the sun, and Clint’s life had begun revolving around him. Neither had expected their feelings to become so strong, to grow in strength or in depth. But it had.

Lilac Alstroemeria Aster (T) Words: 7,303 by @jenjo93

Tags: No powers AU. Bucky works at a flower shop; Clint is a human disaster by day, vigilante by night

On the surface, Clint Barton shares nothing with Bucky Grant, the cute florist he helped save from thieves. Bucky has a business, owns more than one outfit, and looks to have a stable life. Worlds away from Clint’s drama-filled past. Bucky being kidnapped reminds Clint why he doesn’t put his heart on the line anymore.

[Art] by PlaidHunters

Edge of our Hope (T) Words: 5,956 by @punxbarton

Tags: Pacific Rim AU, mention of past character death, mention of past loss of limb

Nobody wonders whether Clint and Bucky are drift compatible. They clearly are. Which is the problem, since Clint already has a drift partner, and Bucky can’t ever pilot again. Well, it’s the problem for some people. Not for them. Never for them.

[Art] by @bizrreer

Still Breathing (T) Words: 8,241 by @victorianbreaker

Tags: Canon-typical Violence, vague Mentions of suicidal thoughts, blood

Clint just wanted to get away. He didn’t want to hurt any one. But he keeps seeing blue…I dodged a bullet and I walked across a landmine / Oh, I’m still alive / Am I bleeding am I bleeding from the storm? / Just shine a light into the wreckage, so far away, away…‘Cause I’m still breathing / 'Cause I’m still breathing on my own / My head’s above the rain and roses / Making my way away / My way to you

[Art] by @theassassinhawk

Not Such a Risk (M) Words: 3,311 by @aw-hawkeye-no

Tags: Dom/Sub, Bondage, dom!Clint, sub!Steve, Sub!Bucky

“Buck, I gotta ask – are you here of your own free will, or did Clint kidnap you and force you to watch Dog Cops?” Steve smirked as he glanced from Bucky to Clint.“Hey!” Clint objected just as Bucky said, “Bit of column A, bit of column B.”Clint huffed indignantly. “As I remember it, I was minding my own business when you barged in here and started questioning my eating habits.”

Or, Clint has been acting as Steve’s and Bucky’s dom for weeks now, but the three of them have never done a scene together.

[Art](nsfw)by @xbittenx

Save Me. (T) Words: 4,867 by @hodginsismylife

Tags:  Not Captain America: The Winter Soldier Compliant, Swearing, Canon-Typical Violence.

Clint Barton just wanted an easy recovery after being braiwashed, he didn’t want to be kidnaped by HYDRA, he didn’t ask for any of this.

[Art] by @marvel-4-life

How to Mate Your Cyborg (G) Words: 2,092 by @nightshadezombie

Bucky and Hagrid spend every Tuesday and Thursday morning at the Midnight Roast, studying and sampling Wade’s questionable baked goods. And maybe pining over Wade’s Other Favorite Cyborg. BTW, Wade totally ships it, guys.

[Art] by fitzz106

 The deals you  made (T) Words: 6,321 by @aijja

Tags: Canon-Typical Violence, Implied/Referenced Torture, AU-Canon Divergence, Fae & Mythical Beings

Bucky is ten when he meets a boy who helps him win a prize for Steve. There’s handshake to agree to a contract, due sometime in the future. They never meet again. Or at least, Bucky doesn’t remember it.

AKA. Don’t make deals with people who appear from thin air.

[Art] by @sian1359

Through the Streets of Long Gone Dreams (T) Words: 10,937 by @rivulet027

Tags: Nightmares, PTSD, Recovering Memories

Bucky’s having trouble sleeping until Lucky decides to adopt him. Now Bucky isn’t sure if he’s sleeping better because of a dog or the archer that comes with the dog.

[Art] by @placna

This Is Where We Start Again (G) Words: 3,377 by @jeminamoonnight

Tags: Kidfic, Accidental baby acquisition, body dysphoria, deaf!Clint

When Clint brings home a baby and wants to keep her, Bucky must confront his  lingering body issues and whether or not he’s ready for the challenges of parenthood. 

[Art] by @fee-does-band-art

Empyrean (T) Words: 2,694 by @icantseemtomiss

Tags: Minor violence, mentions of past abuse. Alternate Universe- Greek,Mythology.

There’s plenty of things you get taught how to handle; like your pet hamster dying, or your girlfriend breaking up with you. But no-one ever teaches you how to handle the Greek god, Apollo, attaching himself to your soul.

[Art] by @pathulu

I Slept With An Assassin and Now I Have Feelings (T) Words: 3,911 by @useless-empty-brain

Tags: Canon-Typical Violence, mentions of brainwashing, getting together.

Years ago Clint and the Winter Soldier are given the same target and meet. Instead of eliminating the competition, the Soldier is intrigued by the disaster who beat him to the target. Through years of mind wipes disjointed images of blond and arrows keep coming back. When he breaks the mind control permanently, he wants to find Steve and the guy who kept sneaking around Hydra’s mind wipes.

[Art] by @mariana-oconnor

Like That Counting Crows Song (T) Words: 4,643 by @madetobeworthy

Tags: No Warnings, fluff, mutual healing, slow burn but it forgot to be slow

Clint’s life is a series of unfortunate events that somehow peaked at his apartment getting blown up. Bucky doesn’t really want to get caught up in his mess, but it’s hard to avoid the homeless guy sleeping on your couch when all you want to do is watch Netflix.

[Art] by @girlouttaplace

Springfield (T) Words: 1,779 by @precise-desolation

Tags: Slow build, Service dogs, PTSD

There was a man who walked  his dog every morning in the park where Clint went for his run.  Of course, Clint knew that was perfectly normal.  It was the dog’s service animal vest that caught his attention.  He had the guy figured for ex-military, he just hadn’t figured him for the Winter Soldier, the ghost sniper.  Or, well, former Winter Soldier.  It was a spur of the moment decision to buy the guy a coffee from the stand they both frequented.  He had wanted to ask about the dog.  He didn’t expect that it would become anything more.

[Art] by @mollynoble

Words Left Unsaid (M) Words: 2,067 by @i-will-always-kneel-for-smut

Tags: Swearing, Not Captain America: Civil War (Movie) Compliant, Not Avengers: Age of Ultron (Movie) Compliant

Clint agreed to an afternoon sparring session with Natasha. Little did he know that by the end of the day he’d be responsible for a former Hydra agent…and one of Steve Rogers oldest friends.

[Art] by @meesedraw

The Barton-Barnes shelter of abandoned animals (G) Words: 1,960 by @asamandra

Tags: barton farm, clint and his strays

For once it’s not Clint who brings in another stray… and Clint is not amused when he finds out what kind of stray it is.

[Art] by @aw-hawkeye-no

As Lucky Would Have It. (T) Words: 6,698 by @dapperanachronism

Tags: Fluff, Angst, Get-Together, Anxiety, Lucky is the best dog,

He tells himself a lot of things. Things like he’s not a burden, things like he’s getting better, things like he’s awake in the middle of the night by choice, just because he enjoys prowling around the tower at night when it’s quiet. It’s the truth, if not the whole truth. What is also the truth is how much he enjoys finding Clint curled up on the living room floor next to a scruffy dog that Bucky knows doesn’t live in the tower with them.

[Art] by @placna

Just a Fool (Whose Luck Has Turned) (E) Words: 4,965 by @words-aremy-weapons

Tags:  Second-hand embarrassment

Clint makes a fool of himself over the comms during a mission, going into vivid detail of everything he feels for Barnes. Embarrassment makes him hide away, until Barnes forces him to come clean about everything.

[Art] by  PlaidHunters

Strike at the Heart of (T) Words: 20,528 by @captn-sara-holmes

Tags: Canon Divergence - Post-Avengers (2012), Clint Barton Feels, Everyone Has Issues, unhealthy platonic relationships, Trust Issues, Emotional Manipulation, Angst and Humor, BAMF Clint Barton, Mind Games. Mind Control, Yasha, STRIKE!Clint, Clint is actually fine, psychological evaluations are not for everyone

The Avengers think he’s traumatized, Fury thinks he needs a break, Natasha wants him to recover. Well, screw those guys. Clint is going to go and make some new friends that appreciate how badass and competent and not-messed-up-after-Loki he is. It goes great, until it doesn’t.

[Art] by @cratercreator

The Broken and The Brave (T) Words: 5,892 by @somnambulist-x

Clint Barton is acquitted after killing the Hulk.No, after killing Bruce Banner.After killing his friend.And Bucky could understand Barton’s next move and as the archer left the city and drove west in his disastrous Dodge Challenger, Bucky grabbed his backpack, hopped on his bike and followed him.He wasn’t going to stop Barton, he wasn’t going to catch him and bring him back…He was simply going with.

[Art] by @mollynoble

5 Times an archer walked into a bar (And one time the bar came to him) (T) Words: 1,553 by @adamsgirl42

Twist on the film "He’s just not that into you”

[Art] by @bizrreer

Dog Cops, Pickpockets, and Love, Oh my! (E) Words:3,634 by PlaidHunter

Tags: sex, blow jobs, rimming, cute dog cops, star wars

“I stole your wallet because I was desperate for money a few years ago and I’ve finally gotten my life under control but the guilt hasn’t left me because you looked like a really sweet person so I went to the address on your driver’s license to return it and apologize but when you answered the door you took one look at me and shouted, “YOU!” and punched me in the face!“

[Art] by @fadesealcat

Five dates Bucky didn’t realize he went on, and the one he planned himself (T) Words: 11,750 by @redsector-a

Tags: Oblivious Bucky, Slow Build Romance, Bucky Feels, Clint is a good boyfriend (even when Bucky doesn’t know he’s his boyfriend), Steve Rogers is a Good Bro, Fluff

To say that Bucky was surprised when Clint kissed him was an understatement. But it was nothing compared to the shock he felt when he learned they’d been dating for months without him realizing it. Clint gets whisked away for a mission before they have time to talk and Bucky is left to figure things out on his own - hindsight being 20/20 he can’t help but wonder how he missed things the first go around.

I think the Voltron team is cornering themselves

I don’t understand what team Voltron is trying to do. In my eyes, they kinda backed themselves into a corner when it comes to Shiro’s death.

The Voltron team is known for sticking to the original Voltron defender of the universe. Not exactly, but they have many similarities, and members of the Voltron team say it themselves in the Netflix Voltron 84’ series. If you don’t know already, in the 84’ version of Voltron {SPOILERS- not really??} Sven (original Shiro) dies, leading Keith to becoming the leader of Voltron and piloting the black lion. It’s very possible that the Voltron team could decide to go on a similar route, killing off Shiro.. but should they?
Most likely, you thought to yourself “no! If they kill off space daddy™ I’ll fucking END MYSELF-” that exact reaction is why it is a poor choice to kill off Shiro.


Nobody wants Shiro to die. You can lie to yourself all you want about how it would be badass for Shiro to die because not only is it paying respects to the original, but it would show that team Voltron ain’t fuckin’ around, and are willing to kill off one of there main character. But for the positives, the negatives are pretty hard hitting. Voltron demographic wether they like it or not, are primarily teens and young adults. It may not be the original demographic, I’m not sure but that’s what it is now. Im very certain they know this, and knowing this killing Shiro would be a VERY bad idea. Killing someone like Shiro that is very obviously a fan favorite, would be catastrophic- pissing there fans off to a whole new level. The amount of harassment they would go through if they decided to pull this, wouldn’t amount to any sort of defense, not even loyal fans that wouldn’t mind his death could stop the armada of anger.


On the other side of the spectrum, if they don’t decide to kill Shiro, the emotional scenes of Shiro talking with Keith about how if he dies, Keith would lead Voltron (Season 2; Episode 3: Shiro’s Escape) and the scene where Shiro tells Keith that one day he WILL lead Voltron (Season 2; Episode 8: the Blade of Malmora) would be completely meaningless.
Now there’s a certain rule I personally follow when it comes to watching a TV series, even animated ones.. every scene is done on purpose. This rule has only failed me maybe once or twice on shows that aren’t really canonical, but Voltron is. Every scene in a show is meant to serve some kind of purpose, and what other purpose would a scene like the one in Blade of Malmora serve? Hell, the entire episode is about Keith needing to control himself, and Shiro says in the beginning “you’ll have to control your emotions if your going to lead this group (Voltron) someday.” This branches off to a whole other topic- personally, I don’t think Keith is ready to lead Voltron.. I don’t think they should have him lead Voltron for a couple YEARS (in show years.) he seems too young and inexperienced to lead a group- Shiro said it himself, he’s gotta control his emotions, and I get that the entire episode was about that- but I doubt one episode is enough. He still shows signs of being too quick on the trigger- and the amount of backlash from Lance- imagine him thinking “how come Shiro doesn’t trust me to lead Voltron? How come he trusts Keith?” Wouldn’t be surprised if Lance grew spiteful. The thought of it gives me heartache..

But anyways back to my point.

The scene serves a purpose, and if they decide not to kill him the scenes would be meaningless yadayadayada- which I’m guessing would also piss off the fandom, but not by much. At least not as many as if they where to kill him off.

The ONLY way out of that corner I can see for them wouldn’t even really solve the issue, just cover it with a really good bandaid. The only way I see possible is if Keith is “leader” of Voltron for a temporary span of time. It would explain there previous issue of having those scenes exist, but at the same time it would be really unfulfilling for them to say things like “if I don’t make it- I want you to lead Voltron” but it would also make sense since he also says “someday” not really pertaining to it being at all permanent. It’s a very back and forth argument but overall, it would make more sense then either of the other two options by supporting both of them equally.

My assumption for season 3 is; Keith might be leader of Voltron for a while, and during this time, we’ll also see what Shiro is dealing with and where he is. It would be like showing two stories at once, as shiro would have no connection to the group until the end of the season.. this probably won’t happen, they’ll probably just pull a season 2 and get him back 3 episodes in, which I wouldn’t mind honestly- it’s all up to interpretation I guess.

‘cause when you walked into the room just then

theatre au collab with @alrightpotter. here’s her part.

a/n: lucie, my love!!! happy birthday!!! i’d want to know you if you reached peak gay or became buffy summers dog or could only eat car tires. i love you badly. id probably give up weetbix for you. have the best day in the world.


Godric’s Post                                                                              8th February 2009

Film: The Wind In the Whomping Willows
Director: Bathilda Bagshot
Plot Summary: 4 friends go for a picnic. Boredom ensues.

I’ve never liked Bathilda Bagshot, and yes this may have been because of an incident at one of my parents’ house parties where she literally hissed at me when I reached for another baked potato, but the point still stands. She continues rely on prolonged dialogue scenes that don’t move the plot along and stretch to the point of absurdity, until the viewer is begging for a change in scene, shot, anything, only to presented with (unbelievably) yet more boredom.  

So put aside whatever resentment you’re harbouring that I just name dropped Bathilda Bagshot and that she used to come to my house, and wallow in how wasted my Friday night was watching this garbage. My personal highlight was the closing credits, because it meant I could at last be free from this endless hell of four people sitting in a wood, talking about sandwiches and grass for two hours straight.

Naturally I imagine some people enjoyed the film, (Bagshot does know her way around a camera, I’ll give her that, the cinematography was flawless.) however dear, cherished, hopefully-subscribed-and-not-reading-this-on-the-free-trial-reader, I must ask: who doesn’t like a little during movie commentary? Before Friday I would have said no one, but after Friday I would have to say no one, with the exception of uptight, haughty gingers.

Rather like Penelope Clearwater’s unfortunate character in The Wind in the Whomping Boredom, I too found myself being falsely accused of a crime I did not commit. In Clearwater’s case (she shines in the film, despite Bagshot’s insistence she be holding a mirror in every scene) it was of stealing the picnic sandwiches. Mine was the slightly more serious charge of ‘injuring’ a fellow reviewer.

I want it stated for the record that no such injury occurred, and that as far as I am aware popcorn is rarely classified as an assault weapon, but I am willing to hear argument on the matter. However I could be wrong because the reviewer in question seemed to genuinely enjoy the Wind In the Whomping Waste of Time, so maybe it wasn’t her eye that should be examined, but her brain.

In summary: this film has done the impossible and been even more tedious than Bagshot’s last effort, A History of the Snake Inside Me, which I didn’t think possible. My nine-year-old criticisms rarely stand up to scrutiny but I think my judgement of Ms Bagshot being The Worst has proven correct. Furthermore, I want it noted for no particular reason at all that if at any point I am contacted by a lawyer about paying medical bills for a non-existent injury, I will do something else ‘ridiculous’ and ‘childlike’ like toilet papering a Certain Reviwers house or broadcasting my witty and hilarious movie commentary over a loudspeaker during each and every film I will ever attend from this point on.

(the editor Remus J. Lupin wishes to clarify for legal reasons that comments above are aimed at no particular individual, all wishes views presented are the writer and the writers views alone, and to please not sue the paper)


Godric’s Post                                                                                  3rd March 2009

Film: 101 Fantastic Beasts
Director: Newt Scamander
Plot Summary: CGI animals have a good time. Audience have a good time.

Scamander has always had a talent for animation, even his questionable films like Beasts Which Are Fantastic If Only We Knew Where To Find Them (nonsensical, long-winded title) and The Porpentina Goldstein Story (thought it was going to be about hedgehogs. It was not.) should be seen purely for their onscreen beauty alone.

Thankfully, 101 Fantastic Beats wasn’t a repeat of the Hedgehog Incident but rather exactly what it says on the tin, 101 Fantastic Beasts romping around the city and having a jolly good time, until one of them dies and the entire world becomes a bleak hell-scape that you are desperate to escape because you can’t stop crying.

Unfortunately my screening experience of this charming film was somewhat hindered by the near constant stream of insults and accusations of ‘eye assault’ from a Certain Reviewer which culminated in said reviewer tipping popcorn that Was Not Hers across The Innocent Victims Lap.

The reviewers in question needn’t have ever spoken again but because a Certain Reviewer had slandered another Wholly Blameless Reviewer in her paper, which the Wholly Blameless Reviewer’s Mother reads, some things had to be sorted out. And those things were trying to get the Certain Reviewer to print a retraction so the Wholly Blameless Reviewers Mother would stop bloody going on about it.  

On top of this Wholly Blameless was mocked mercilessly for showing emotion during what ranks as one of the most heart-breaking scenes of all time, next to such movie moments as the ending of Dead Poets Society and the shooting of Bambi’s mother in Bambi. Obviously a Certain Reviewer needs to borrow a heart so she doesn’t have to poke fun at others for having what she does not: feelings. Wholly Blameless would be happy to lend her some of his, as he’s just good like that and not at all the ‘slice of expired a*shole’ he’d previously been accused of being.

101 Beasts has heart (unlike Certain Reviewer’s) and is appropriate for the whole family excluding twelve year olds, because obviously they’re terrible and you’d never want to take them anywhere anyway, so it’s a win-win.

(The editor wishes to clarify that the writers list of saddest movie moments is flawed because it has left off the Jack death scene from Titanic because the writer thinks ‘Cameron clearly emotionally manipulated the audience’ and ‘there was plenty of room for both of them on that door’ because the writer is an imbecile. The editor cannot believe he is the film critic.)


Godric’s Post                                                                                  11th April 2009

Film: The Cupboard Under The Stairs
Director: Gilderoy Lockhart
Summary: You really don’t want to know.

Gilderoy Lockhart has won two Oscars, and yet every time I watch one of his films I have to forcefully remind myself that it wasn’t shot by a nine-year old with a camcorder who uses their dog as a sound assistant. The dullness of the film will stun and bewilder all who see it, as it defies reason why such a thing should be made.

True Hairy Chins Shouldn’t Be Seen By The Public was wildly funny (despite meaning to be a serious documentary), but aside from that I can’t think of a Lockhart film I’ve ever enjoyed aside from classics like Gadding With Ghouls and Travels With Trolls which hardly look like Lockhart films at all, despite him having directed them.

Cupboard Under The Stairs is so mind-blowing ridiculous, from the wooden dialogue to the extended shots of director and star Lockhart doing mind-numbingly boring tasks while smiling garishly, that when I found myself sitting next to a Certain Reviewer I didn’t even bother to move but rather stayed if only to have something to do. A slight physical fight broke out, and by fight I mean a Certain Reviewer hit me for a comment I made about the twenty second long director credit, so obviously I pinched her, and then before I knew what was happening we had been thrown out.

I don’t want you to think, dear reader who has clicked on this review and therefore pays my rent, that I might have acted unprofessionally by getting thrown out a movie twenty minutes in. I want to clarify: I absolutely acted unprofessionally. There is no ‘might’ about it. But my point still stands: the film was garbage, and that fact that I could tell this from only the first twenty minutes is further evidence of its garbagery.

Now I know at this point you’re all clambering to hear more about the two hours I spent alone with a Certain Reviewer, as for some bizarre reason, you’re all incredibly interested in our relationship built off pure loathing and irritation. Well, prepare yourselves readers, because a Certain Reviewer’s favorite filmmaker is not only Wes Anderson (!! There should be a limit to the amount of pastel on a screen at one point). But she also hasn’t read the best novel of all time, The Great Gatsby, and then told me that that ‘wasn’t that weird’ and asked me to ‘close my mouth’ because ‘its been two minutes’ and its ‘getting weird’.

However she did earn points back by liking Star Wars (if she hadn’t, I may have committed a crime worse than Cupboard Under the Stairs’ acting) and she also noted that Leonardo DiCaprio in Romeo + Juliet was her sexual awakening, and I to felt a deep attraction to DiCaprio and still do despite his insistence on growing a beard every few years. She laughed at this, but I think it was a laugh of agreement, so therefore it wasn’t bad.

Cupboard Under the Stairs was one of the worst atrocities committed to film, but a Certain Reviewer agreed that Han shooting first was an important part of his character, so all is not wrong with the world.


Text from James Potter to Sirius Black: do u think i look like leonardo dicaprio

Sirius Black: no

Sirius Black: is this bc evans said she liked him

James Potter: absolutely not


Text from James Potter to Remus Lupin: do i look like leo dicaprio

Remus Lupin: firstly, dont call him leo

Remus Lupin: and secondly, obvsly not

Remus Lupin: no two people have ever looked more different

James Potter: fuck u


Text from James Potter to Peter Pettigrew: do i look like leo dicaprio

Peter Pettigrew: no u look like u have a thing for evans

Peter Pettigrew: sirius told me to say that

Peter Pettigrew: whos evans

James Potter: do u not even read my fuckin column pete

Peter Pettigrew: it costs four pounds a week to subscribe to ur shitty paper i don’t have that kind of money


Godric’s Post                                                                                     3rd May 2009

RED CARPET WATCH

The Godric’s own Sirius Black, gossip columnist extraordinaire, was sent to the Red Carpet premiere of A Streetcar Named the Knightbus and reported back to us on all the hot gossip and glamour of the night.

In what may have been my favorite red-carpet to date, not in the least because Rita Skeeter was thrown out for badgering guests only ten minutes in, but because the greatest thing in the world happened. It was so great in fact, that I managed to look past the colossal injustice of me not being invited to walk the carpet myself, which was clearly a mistake (the editor Remus J Lupin would like to clarify it was not) and have a roaring good night.

May I just clarify that by roaring good night I mean I got absolutely plastered (The editor wishes to state that The Godric does not promote drinking) so the night comes back to me in bits, and from what I can remember everyone looked great. I can’t remember what the film was about, or even if they let me in (editor: they did not.) but even if it wasn’t I’m sure the film was good too. (editor: it was average)

But as I mentioned above, the best thing in the world happened, and that was that The Godric’s very own film critic James Potter got to walk the red carpet. He will tell you this is because his insightful and poignant columns are finally getting the attention they deserve. Any sane person would then loudly talk over him and say the real reason is because he’s become rapidly more popular with the introduction of a Miss Lily Evans, also a film critic, into his weekly reviews. Or, as James calls her, A Certain Reviewer. (editor: for legal reasons the editor must assert that A Certain Reviewer could be any individual and to please not sue the paper for defamation.)

Turns out Miss Evans had a popularity boost as well, because she was also on the red carpet, looking ravishing in a backless teal ballgown, and honestly, readers, it was a sight to see Evans in that dress. Potter obviously thought so to, as he spent the entire night staring. And not subtle staring. Obvious, in-awe, I-can’t-believe-a-person-can-look this-good, staring.

Now, once I’d gotten over the fact that not once in our ten-year friendship had James ever given me that look, I was absolutely thrilled. I had a thirty pound bet going that they’d be together by May and I’d just won, if that look was any indication. (the editor: it was twenty pounds.)

Furthermore, Evans and Potter spent the entire night talking, not even noticing how the cameras had utterly latched on to them despite having no idea who they were, purely based on the looks they were giving each other. It was a sight to behold, seeing two utterly oblivious people in formalwear hold a conversation probably about the merits of dressing gowns (they talk about weird stuff like that) while what felt like the entire world took photos.

Now I’m aware I’m meant to be discussing the gossip and glamour from the whole night and not just two D-list celebrities who happen to both be my friends. But consider this: I do not care. These photos are modern art. Both so clearly have a crush on each other it’s embarrassing. Even Moony would have to agree (the editor: I do.). Anyway, in summary of the night: I bet everyone reading this that they’ll be screwing in a month. Mark my words.

[image: a man in a suit and a woman in a dress, against a while backdrop with A Street Car Named the Knightbus film logo printed across it. Her head is turned towards him, laughing, holding a delicate purse. He is looking at her, mouth parted, like she is the first girl he has ever seen. Something to be looked at just to make sure she didn’t disappear, blown by the wind, like in a dream. A dream girl- except not. A real girl, in a real dress, in a real place. He can’t quite believe it. A hundred camera flashes go in the background.]


Text from Sirius Black to James Potter: so whens the wedding

James Potter: i fuckin hate u


Sirius Black renamed the group james’ got the hots for evans

James Potter: this is cyber bullying

James Potter: im calling netsafe

Remus Lupin renamed the group netsafe cant help the fact that ur in love with evans

James Potter renamed the group stop now

Sirius Black renamed the group not a chance mate


Sirius Black created the Facebook Page Lily Evans and James Potter should get it on

This page received 17,798 likes.


Text from Lily Evans to Sirius Black: im going to fucking maim u. take it down.

Sirius Black: sent a link

Lily Evans: if that’s a link to the fucking page i will cut your balls off

Sirius Black: its not

Sirius Black: on an unrelated note do not click on that link it is a virus I just remembered


Remus Lupin created the Facebook Page Lily Evans and James Potter should get it on part two because lily made us delete the last one

This page received: 21,104 likes.


(don’t forget to check out ellie’s part here)