and this is after correction edits

someone faked a quote from Horikoshi saying All Might is bi, and it broke my friend’s heart to find out it was fake, b/c she was so, soso happy to hear about it, b/c she’s also bi

guys…. don’t post/create fake stuff like that b/c you’ll get people’s hopes up, and then they’ll come crumbling down when they find out it’s fake. especially on places that are supposed to have official, confirmed information.

you’ll always have your headcanons and the content you create. but please don’t post or make fake stuff like that claiming that Horikoshi himself said it. it’s not fair to anyone, and you may hurt others in the process.

(for those curious: this is the post in question. the original translation of “breaking up” was a mistranslation that’s been corrected in other translations, including the official, and someone edited the wikia with a fake quote and no source. also, please, DO NOT go after the person who posted the quote b/c they had no idea it was fake when they posted it. it’s not their fault)

A way to get rid of blue lines in Clip Studio paint in case you use lined paper or sketch in blue.

After you scan your image in and rotate it to how you like. We first want to make the lines and blue pop out a little more if they aren’t already.

Now go to Tone Curve and in the drop down, select Red and drag the left box all the way up, then change the dropdown to green and do the same there.

Now go to Hue/Saturation in the same Tonal Correction menu under Edit and slide the saturation slider all the way to the left

As you can see we’re now left with the lines, but they seem a bit washed out- we can fix that with more editing in the levels.

and done!

Hey noodles! I’m back with another masterpost! I’ve gotten a few asks about how I take photos, so I decided to condense all of this into one post.

all my posts | my masterposts | ask me anything


Lighting:

  • Shoot when it’s light out for best quality photos, because natural lighting is honestly your best friend. Taking them when it’s lighter out will also make it easier to edit them.
  • ** A lesser known tip that I’ve learned myself is to take photos in pure light. My room is pink, so unless I take pictured in the middle of my room at noon they turn out with an annoying purple tint. it’s hard to edit that out, so I sometimes go to other spots in my house to take photos.
  • EXTRA: If you’re taking photos with a screen turn down the brightness. High brightness gives the screen so much glare that you often can’t see anything other than a bright spot.

Taking the photos:

  • I’m using a colorful planner as an example, so I’m using a white background.
  • If your subject is plainer, you can use a brighter background. (I used a sweater)
  • You can also take a picture of your whole desk.
  • EXTRA: lots of pillowcases/sheets=lots of backgrounds!

Editing:

  • I use Aviary and vsco, and I edit the brightness/exposure, contrast, saturation, warmth, and tint. On vsco I add either the filters A6 or OC and add on the following to fit.
  • Brightness/exposure: turn these up depending on how bright your original photos are
  • Contrast: turn this up for clarity
  • Saturation: turn the saturation up because photos will generally look washed out after you turn up the brightness (be careful that it doesn’t look unnatural)
  • Warmth: always turn this down, especially if you take pictures in artificial light.
  • Tint: this is what I use to correct the purple-y tint that a lot of my pictures cave because of the color of my walls (I turn it greener, but I imagine it’ll be opposite if you have a green/blue room).

Here are some more before and afters:

++look at this post for the individual photos

I took these around 5 PM, and you can definitely see the purple I was talking about above.

More masterposts like this:

People who take great photos and links to their original content:

@stillstudies | posts

@littlestudyblrblog | posts

@obsidianstudy | posts

@stvdybuddies | posts

@bookmrk | posts

@academiix | posts

@studie-s | posts

@studyfulltime | posts

@studytherin | posts

@studylustre | posts

@studyquill | posts


An important point:

You don’t have to do this at all to be a good studyblr. Plenty of amazing studyblrs don’t jump through this many hoops every time they want to post. I would actually encourage you to not do all of this every time you want to post. I used to spend hours agonizing over my photos, and, believe it or not, my grades went down! Now I know how to balance the aesthetic and actual studying, but I was so caught up in how my notes looked that I wasn’t studying them. If you like to take pretty notes and photographs, then have fun with it, but definitely don’t feel pressured to do all of this if you don’t want to.

3

@harrypotternetwork creation event harry ships: hinny

instagram au: after ginny’s fifth season with the harpies and first world cup title, the two take a well deserved holiday and harry can’t help but post pictures of it (correction: of ginny) all over instagram

2

“If efforts never lied, the one who practices the most would win time after time. But, as of course, no matter how hard a person works, if they can’t win, they can’t win. And conversely, much younger athletes may overtake them forcefully. Therefore, efforts do lie. But that doesn’t mean efforts are in vain. It is precisely because efforts lie that we are prompted to think about how to work hard in a different way, and find the correct direction in which to expend our efforts.” – Yuzuru Hanyu

I’m listening to ttazz after 59 and ??????????? let me talk about this for a second since it was addressed by the mcelroys and had a lot of missing context to these interpretations. 

folks the reason taako’s ethnicity is important to be mexican (and I mean specifically mestizo mexican) isn’t because justin named his god damn wizard after tacos. in fact his name has zero to do with why I interpret him as mestizo. the reason is that part of taako’s arc is to invent in this world the concept of tacos, which is a traditionally mexican style dish. this was explicitly stated to be part of taako’s development from episode 1. 

it’s not that big of a deal (under these circumstances, imo, but correct me if I’m wrong) that a mestizo character is named after mexican food, taako’s a vain character and in the context of the story I can completely see him naming a dish after himself. what is a big deal is having someone outside of that ethnicity invent something from a culture that doesn’t belong to them. that’s honestly worse than having mestizo characters named after latinx food. 

[don’t comment on this if you aren’t latinx, ok to rb for everyone | this post has been edited to be more culturally appropriate] 

In the light of the latest 2CT revelation...

just a friendly reminder that in this panel from the bonus chapter (vol.22) Vincent literally said

“But I do hope that you’ll follow the fate of my sons through to the end.”

[*Note: the picture above is not the original page from YP, but I edited (corrected) it because their translation of this line was inaccurate.]

And here’s the original Japanese text in case you need further proof:

「貴方達はどうか私の息子達の行く末を見守ってやってほしい」

(“Please watch over the fate of my sons.”)


And here they are, Vincent’s sons:

“I’m home”

“This can’t be true”

- chapter 129


Bonus:

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▌That butler, resting//scans & translations

My personal translations for the mini comic published with the Kuroshitsuji Book of the Atlantic blu-ray limited edition set, featured here. It is a side-story to accompany the Campania chapters of the manga series.

I cannot edit scanlations. You may access my scans below to accompany my translations. I only request that you do not repost any of my posts or edit over the Japanese text for your own scanlations without my consent or credit. This is from my personal collection and that is my only request; please respect my work since I usually only translate for myself ♞ 

【 That butler, resting 】-「枢やな描き下ろしコミック」- enjoy after the jump!

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8

It’s not that he doesn’t make mistakes, and he’s quick to let taunts get to him. But he’s the second-strongest after Azumane, and most importantly, his ability to perform when he’s cornered doesn’t deteriorate. That mental strength… Those are unmistakably the qualities of an ace. 

Cursed Child rant

Alright, Witches, Wizards, Muggles, and magical creatures big and small, hold onto your broomsticks because I’m about to tell you why I do not like Harry Potter and the Cursed Child nor accept it as canon. 

Spoilers ahead. Obviously. but c’mon who hasn’t read it or been spoiled by now Also, it got super long. 


Let’s start off by saying: it’s been months since I read it. If I get some things off a little, go ahead and tell me; I’ll edit the rant and correct it. If you just don’t agree with me… that’s great for you. Okay? We good? That’s all the disclaimer you’re getting. Moving on! 


Where do I begin? Um… Let’s recap shall we? 

It starts with Albus Severus Potter (who’s name I still cannot get over) meeting and becoming friends with Scorpius Malfoy. 

Okay. Great. We’ve all wanted that for years. No problem. 

We’ve also played with the idea of Albus in Slytherin for years. I have no problem with that either. 

What I do have problems with is the way Albus is treated after he is put in Slytherin. He’s the outcast of his family. He’s the “disappointing son”. After Harry’s canon “the bravest man I knew was Slytherin” speech (don’t get me started on Snape), I expected a bit better treatment of Slytherins. But Albus is Slytherin and looked at sideways by the entire cast, except Scorpius. This could easily become a rant about Slytherin’s and stereotypes and treatment, but I give enough of those already. 

My issues are mostly with Albus’ personality. Now, I didn’t write the character. He’s not mine. I don’t have the authority to tell anyone how he should be. All I can do is have headcanons. But “canon” Albus doesn’t exactly display a lot of Slytherin traits. Sure he sneaks around, but so does Harry, Ron, and Hermione and they’re all Gryffindor. If my memory serves me correctly, Albus goes to Slytherin because he basically thinks, “Well, the Gryffindors I know suck, let’s try Slytherin.”it’s been a while since I read it okay  

Albus is jaded by the time the plot picks up. He doesn’t like flying, isn’t that good at it or Quidditch (which honestly feels like they’re just trying to make him as unlike Harry as possible which I could handle if it wasn’t so badly written), and is basically convinced his life is horrible. (I’ll get into why a little later.) This kid shows no Slytherin traits that I remember. He hardly shows any traits really. I think it was the play format, but Albus becomes a stereotypical teenager who has daddy issues and doesn’t like his life. 

Scorpius I don’t really have a big problem with, besides it going against my personal headcanons. He at least shows a bit more Slytherin traits than jaded Albus. I feel like they were trying to break Slytherin stereotypes with him- which is great and all, but it almost makes me feel like that’s all Scorpius’ personality was. As if he was made to simply disrupt our preconceived ideas of what Slytherin is. I don’t like it. Stereotypes are something I can’t stand, but come on, people, don’t strip my house of what we actually are. 

Okay, moving on from Slytherin. 

Let’s take a step back from the new characters and visit the one’s we already know, we already love. Oh wait, they’ve been ripped to shreds. 

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docs.google.com
CONVENTION SELLERS SPREADSHEET
INFO ABOUT,--> CLICK--> Click on the first cell in a row to expand the text. This sheet is a tool made for artist alley sellers to better manage their business. We' ve been using this setup for about two years now and it has proven invaluable to assessing growth and making future merch decisio...

hello, tumblr! today i come bearing gifts! my wife is an absolute treasure and over the past year+ has been building/perfecting an onsite profit tracking spreadsheet!

provided you give it the correct information it tracks your net income (income after expenses) and also shows you what you are making per hour (plus, you can see where you’re real income is coming from, it’s very humbling and revealing)!

if you have questions, she is myowsers on twitter

CSP Color balances

Hi, this took me over an hour to do this and i swear i have no idea how to do tutorials at all, since anon asked I only have this tip from Clip Studio Paint that can help you finalize your painting without making it looking all muddy.

Click Read More to see the entire progress explained

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Mashima Hiro interview by WebNewtype (2/5/17)

Quick translation so that I can get this up before the movie airs. Please correct me if you spot any errors.

Article ©WebNewtype
Translated by thefairystales | DO NOT EDIT OR REMOVE SOURCE
Please credit by linking back when using. (usage rules)

You not only drew the key visual and designed original characters for Fairy Tail Dragon Cry, but also worked on a storyboard close to 200 pages in length. What made you so involved in the production of the movie?

All I did was to start drawing after the request came (laugh). The request to make a movie came in just when the manga was entering its final part, and I had many ideas floating around in my head. Nothing would begin if no one does anything, and I wanted to give my best since I was asked to be involved in it.

When did talk about writing an original storyboard start?

There was interest expressed in making another movie right after the first movie (Fairy Tail the Movie: Phoenix Priestess) was released. I was also interested, and since I had amassed many ideas that I was not able to use in the manga, I tried to come up with a story leading to a new climax. I was hoping that the release of the movie could coincide with the climax of the manga, even though I did not specifically aim for it to happen.

When the PV of the movie was released, there was also a comment posted of you saying “I want to make a movie that is focused on entertainment.” Which parts of the movie contribute to that?

I came up with the story of Phoenix Priestess while thinking “I want to make all the fans cry”. However, Dragon Cry turned out to be a simple story with its highlight being the intense battles and flashy action scenes. I thought that it would be nice to make a movie that the audience can enjoy without having to think too much while watching. I also drew the key visual, and I wanted the scene where half of Natsu’s body is dragonized to be the focus.

You also commented that there are surprises in the movie.

A certain character’s past, which has not been touched on in the manga, is revealed in the movie. Please watch attentively “to the end”! In addition, there are various references made in the movie, even though many of them have unfortunately been cut… You can see what has been cut by comparing the movie with the original storyboard. The storyboard is merely a draft, and it’s embarrassing to show it to everyone.

I’ve seen both the original storyboard and the film, and I feel that the original characters Swan, Doll and Gapri are even more charming in the movie as compared to the original draft.

I made additional suggestions after submitting the original storyboard, and also received suggestions from the anime staff. There were many parts of the movie which were touched up after we integrated our ideas. Of the 3 characters mentioned, Swan became an especially good character after that. I have yet to watch the completed film, but I think that it’s an enjoyable movie.

We can also see new settings that have yet to appear in the manga.

Most of these, including the “surprise” that I’ve mentioned earlier, are things that wouldn’t be included in the manga and drawn only for the movie. In that sense, the movie complements the manga and I hope everyone will enjoy it.

You have also worked on the storyboard for the original animation DVDs (OAD) that were bundled with the manga volumes. Were there aspects of that experience that you made use of when you worked on the original storyboard for this movie?

The original storyboard is also a draft proposal, drawn with the expectation that the anime staff would adjust its contents accordingly. I drew it with the same feeling as I would draw the manga. However, doing the anime storyboard was difficult, and I had a tough time! I drew it while timing the seconds with a stopwatch in one hand, and also repeatedly grappled with trying to understand terms that I had just learned while working on it.

You handled the writing of the original storyboard in a similar manner as the manga.

When it comes to the weekly serialization of the manga, there have been times when I was absolutely stuck and and just decided that “I’ll just drag things on till the next chapter for now, and wager on myself (when I work on the chapter for) next week!” (laugh). That wouldn’t work when it comes to the draft of the anime, and I made sure that I handled the story composition and development properly, recalling the days when I was still a rookie.

Please tell us about yourself as well. What are the kinds of things that interest or appeal to you when you come into contact with a piece of work?

I think a good piece of work is one that surprises the audience, and I tend to like those that contain an unexpected twist right at the end. I keep in mind the joy of trying to surprise my readers when I am drawing as well. When I’m developing my story, I don’t foreshadow one event after another, but instead often adopt a pattern where I’ll add in some foreshadowing at parts that I can potentially expand on, and revise it when I expand on the event subsequently. I’ve become good at this since I’ve been doing it for a long time, but there have also been times when sharp readers have pointed out something that had been retconned. I want to work towards being able to draw my manga in such a way that nothing appears to be retconned even if I had revised something retrospectively. RAVE was my debut manga, and I drew it with all the developments firmly set in place. However, serialization of Fairy Tail began with me casually deciding that the story is more or less about wizards going on jobs. It was fun coming up with stories about the various situations they encounter, and I think this style is one that suits me.

Two chapters of Fairy Tail will be concurrently released on 26 April in the combined issue 21.22 of Weekly Shonen Magazine. You are known as someone who works quickly; What is the secret behind that?

I’m not fast at all! It just appears to be that way! I’m happy that people think that way, but my pace of work cannot be considered fast if you were to leap in and see the manga circle from the inside. I have to accelerate my schedule little by little many months before so that I can stock up, and only release 2 chapters at one go when I have a surplus of one full chapter of content. I don’t draw 2 chapters worth of content all of a sudden (laugh).

You also post illustrations of Fairy Tail on Twitter even though you’re busy.

I started it as a form of fan service, and also partly as a hobby because it was a fun. I’m also glad that I get to personally experience the support of many foreign fans through the replies I receive. I’ve heard about having foreign fans from the editorial department, but I thought that they were just paying me lip service (laugh). I worked on the manga with an awareness of the foreign market after that. For example, I try to ensure that the shape of the speech bubbles are more circular rather than elliptical so that it would be easier to fit the English-translated lines. I also take into consideration the difficulties of translation, and stopped including puns that play on the Japanese language.

Fairy Tail has been serialized for 10 years, and next year marks 20 years of your professional debut as a manga artist. Please tell us your feelings about your journey.

This 10 years passed in the blink of an eye. It feels like only so little time has passed, yet at the same time, it has already been 10 years. I was a high school student when I started seriously aiming to be a manga artist, and looking back, I think I was really lucky. I was also aided by the trend of the times. There were hardly any fantasy manga in Weekly Shonen Magazine at the time of my debut, and filling that niche has allowed me to come this far.

Lastly, please leave a message for the fans.

If you enjoyed watching Dragon Cry, that is because of the effort put in by the anime staff. Please convey your comments to them. The Fairy Tail manga is also heading towards its climax. I would be glad if you continue reading till the end!

Every time I see someone giving writing advice, I always see the same thing:

OUTLINE.

Now, this obviously works for a great many writers. It does not work for me. I know, for I have tried it. Outlining is the fastest way for me to guarantee that the story will not be written. Once I know the entire story from beginning to end, I no longer have to tell it to myself. And writing down the basic plot–well, it’s writing it down. Writing is the last part of my process, not the first. Once I get to the writing down part…this is what I have settled on. Writing out an outline of a plot before I start writing a story locks me into that plot and makes it harder for me to think spontaneously about what needs to happen, both to develop the characters and to surprise the readers.

And don’t even get me started on those 100-question interviews with your characters. 

Mind you, I do plan stories–eventually. I visualize stories like they’re movies. I have shot and re-shot scenes a thousand times in my head to see if this will dovetail neatly with the previous scene or if it will be awkward. I run through dialogue while I’m washing the dishes. But none of the scenes or settings or dialogue are things that I’m committed to…not until I start writing the story. My mental storyboarding still involves planning, but it doesn’t make me feel restricted like an outline does.

I don’t believe that “pantsers,” as writers who don’t outline are called by many in the writing community, are worse writers than those who do outline. What I do believe is that people want to know how writers write. And you see, there are a lot of books about how to become a better writer.

Here’s the problem:  My writing process is not very complicated. I start with a character or two and a) a terrible situation, b) a what if, or c) something cracktastic that doesn’t sound like it could possibly make sense and then make sense of it (like the Hamlet/Cthulhu Mythos crossover I wrote once). There is a lot of staring at a blank screen, grumbling, letting my mind drift while playing hidden object games, and thinking out stories while taking clothes out of the dryer, washing dishes or rolling up bandages. You’d be hard pressed to turn that into an essay, let alone a book.

Books by outliners generally talk about a thousand things that they do before they get started. The plot structure. The characters’ personal histories. The themes. The research (which they always do beforehand, rather than, as I do, before and during). The editing (which they all insist must be done afterwards, and not, as I do, during, because I find it less stressful to correct and rewrite as I go along, and afterward, after at least one person has had a chance to proofread it).

Outlining just sounds more serious. More organized. And because you can outline so many aspects of a story, almost all writing books are written by outliners…to the point where some writing books speak disparagingly of those who do not, treating us as lazy and inefficient. 

And honestly, I understand this. Many writers of such books seem to gravitate naturally to outlines, so of course that seems best to them. Complicating matters is the fact that, as I said, pantsers tend not to author books on how to write, so the outliners have nothing to compare their method to. Outlining is praised highly from one end of the community to the other–so, the attitude runs, why doesn’t everyone do it? it works, doesn’t it?

Yes. It works for many people. But not all. I suspect that there are as many writing processes as there are people.  And you know what? That’s fine.

So to those who hate outlining, who feel straitjacketed by it, whose minds tangle and snarl when they try to employ it…you’re not alone. And you’re not a bad writer. You’re a writer. Do what works for you.

On Editing

This was forwarded to me by a former colleague who attended a course on how to publish/edit a book. You probably already know most of these tips, but there might be something you’ll find helpful, who knows…

QUESTIONS TO ASK DURING FIRST PHASE OF EDITING

GENERAL STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK (what the story is and how it is being told):

  • What is the book about? What is the driving force behind the narrative?
  • Who is the audience for this book?
  • Is it based on real experience?
  • Does the story work? Are there any parts that feel unconvincing or where the narrative drags? 
  • Are there any parts I don’t understand?
  • What is the trajectory or the shape of the story?
  • Does the story start in the right place?
  • How quickly do I become immersed in the book?
  • Are there any points where my immersion in the story is broken, or I lose interest?
  • Do I believe in what I’m reading?
  • How satisfying is the ending? Does it feel inevitable?
  • Does it feel like anything is missing?
  • Is there anything extraneous (characters, detail, unnecessary plot points)?
  • What is the narrative point of view (first person, second person, third person)? Does it change? Is it consistent? Does it work? What might be lost or gained if the story were told another way?
  • Is the tense consistent? If it changes, is it necessary?
  • Does coincidence feature as a plot device? If so, is there another way to engineer the same events?

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