and the woman who plays jane

On playing LGBT characters
  • Interviewer: tell us a bit about your character.
  • Actress: oh I play a brilliant lesbian surgeon who is just getting into a new relationship with a beautiful and strong woman.
  • Interviewer: ohhhhh, I'm so sorry for you.
  • Actress: pardon me?
  • Interviewer: I didn't realize you were going to die on the show
  • Actress: I didn't say that.
  • Interviewer: yeh, yeh you did.
  • Actress: No. I said I was playing a lesbian character
  • Interviewer: ...
  • Actress: .... oh

friend: hey, what’s up

me: Nick never loved me. He loved a girl who doesn’t exist. A girl I was pretending to be. The Cool Girl. Men always use that as the defining compliment, right? She’s a cool girl. Being Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker and dirty jokes, who plays videogames and chugs beer, loves threesomes and anal sex and jams chilidogs into my mouth like I’m hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang-bang –while remaining a size 2, because cool girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool girls never get angry at their men, they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner. Go ahead! Shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the cool girl. I waited patiently-years-for the pendulum to swing the other way, for men to start reading Jane Austen, organize scrapbook parties, and make out with each other while we leer. And then we’d say, yeah, he’s a cool guy. Instead, women across the nation colluded in our degradation! Pretty soon every girl was Cool Girl, and if you weren’t, then there was something wrong with you.But it’s tempting, to be Cool Girl. For someone like me, who likes to win, it’s tempting to be the girl every guy wants.When I met Nick I knew that’s what he wanted. For him, I was willing to try. I couldn’t have been Cool Girl with anyone else. I wouldn’t have wanted to. Nick teased things out in me I didn’t know existed: A lightness, a humor, an ease. And I made him smarter, sharper. I forced him to rise to my level. I was happier for those few years, pretending to be someone else, than I ever have been before or after. But then it had to stop, because it wasn’t me! I hated Nick for being surprised when I became me. He couldn’t believe I didn’t love wax-stripping my pussy raw and blowing him on request. That my fantasy baseball team was not a labor of love. It had to stop. Committing to Nick, feeling safe with Nick, being happy with Nick, made me realize that there was a Real Amy in there, and she was so much better, more interesting and complicated and challenging, than Cool Girl. But Nick wanted Cool Girl anyway. Can you imagine, finally showing your true self to your soulmate, and having him not like you? 

So in case some of you guys haven’t heard the recent news regarding Thor 3- as of now Natalie Portman/Jane Foster is NOT returning to reprise her role as Jane.

But Marvel does have a actress by the name of Tessa Thompson (who is a woman of color) who’s rumored to play Valkyrie. And given the recent and ongoing fiasco that is the Stucky fandom…PLEASE protect Tessa and Valkyrie at all costs, of course she’s already getting some negative feedback from the Jane/Thor stans.

You know it will get worse- so I encourage you guys to call them out on their bullshit on sight, thank you.

what if captain america was literally just… a woman with a buzzcut.

look @ this giant woman, going to the front even though the US thinks women are only good to be propaganda pieces and ornamentation.

just like a really vintage dyke who is super protective of other women and cuts her own hair with a straight razor; she and her “roommate” probably went drinking at the butch/femme bars, even though stevie could only handle a couple of drinks before she was out cold.  look at this tiny sneezing butch. 

captain america as played by gwendoline christie

(jane buchanan barnes is, like, kristen stewart)

I am on a quest! For the PERFECT Pride and Prejudice cast! I’ll be reviewing the characters from one of my favourite books, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and selecting the actor who played the character the best! 

Colin Firth 

You know him as Darcy, in fact everyone does. In the mid to late 1990s, every woman was head over heels in love with Firth as Darcy in one form or another. The 1995 adaption of Pride and Prejudice started a nationwide trend for period dramas and excessive side burns. It even inspired a cult classic in it’s own right, “Bridget Jones’s Diary”, and in the film adaption, Mark Darcy was played by none other that Firth himself.

Lets analyse Firth’s Darcy to see what makes him so iconic,

PROS

  • Wet shirt
  • Very funny and vulnerable when he wants to be 
  • So angry

CONS

  • Has a bit of a dad vibe
  • Tainted forever by Mamma Mia 
  • So angry

Matthew Macfadyen

He played Darcy in the beautifully shot 2005 adaption with Keira Knightley, and then went on to star in the BBC drama “Spooks”, but other than that, he hasn’t hit Hollywood hard since. His Darcy was vulnerable and was so obviously in love with Elizabeth that it makes me melt every time I watch it. I have lots of love for Macfadyen, reasons being this scene

which is beautifully filmed and the chemistry is amazing. Oh and this moment

PROS

  • That bit where he says “love” three times and it’s the cutest thing in the world
  • When he roleplays Jane to help Bingley at the end
  • SEXUAL TENSION

CONS

  • Not as pretty 
  • Not as angry
  • No curly hair

Daniel Vincent Gordh

He’s the originally faceless Darcy from Hank Green and Bernie Su’s webseries of Pride and Prejudice. His reveal on the show was one of the tensest moments of my life. This series sent me back onto my Pride and Prejudice obsession, because it was so painfully accurate and so painfully funny. Ashley Clements deserves a shout out for her version of Darcy 

PROS

  • Very cute
  • Never angry
  • So much tension and chemistry with Lizzie

CONS

  • Sometimes a little bit wooden
  • Not really my idea of Darcy
  • The bow ties 

Sam Riley 

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. That is correct, regency deliciousness, and rotting corpses. It’s perfect. The film is relatively new, and is based off the 2009 book of the same name. Sam Riley plays a zombie hunter, weapons master version of the Darcy we all know and love, taking his frustrations and general anger out on the undead. This film has many qualities, but one of its best is the truthfulness to the original whilst still being completely fresh. Take the first proposal scene for instance

PROS

  • THAT PROPOSAL SCENE
  • Right level of constant annoyance
  • Totally in awe of Elizabeth

CONS

  • The voice doesn’t match his face?
  • Darcy’s emo phase
  • Leather jacket?

And the winner is…

Always Firth. He’s synonymous with the role, as soon as the name Fitzwilliam Darcy comes into my head, out he emerges in blazant glory and his wet white shirt. I love Macfayden because I love the 2005 adaption, but Colin Firth has played Darcy twice, and no body can top that.

'Thor: Ragnarok': Now We Know Why Natalie Portman's Jane Won't Be Coming Back
Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman in 2011’s Thor. (Photo: Everett)

Asgardian god of thunder Thor will be getting a new haircut and a familiar sidekick, in the form of Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk, in this fall’s Thor: Ragnarok, the third stand-alone adventure for the Avenger. He’ll also be meeting a new woman, Tessa Thompson’s formidable warrior, Valkyrie. Which raises the question, what happened to Thor’s girlfriend, Dr. Jane Foster, played in the first two Thor films by Academy Award winner Natalie Portman? The answer, apparently, is that the couple chose to part ways.

As reported by Entertainment Weekly, Marvel president Kevin Feige explained that, for Ragnarok, the studio wanted Thor to be on his own for a little while and then to meet a new woman who wasn’t daunted by his superhuman stature. (Marvel isn’t saying whether or not Valkyrie and Thor’s relationship will get romantic.)

“We wanted Thor to encounter somebody that was near his equal,” said Feige. “His relationship with Jane may have evolved in unexpected ways in between The Dark World and Ragnarok, and we wanted to pit him against a character who was much more his equal and, in many ways, his superior.”

The new EW cover with Cate Blanchett, left, Chris Hemsworth, and Tessa Thompson. (Photo: Entertainment Weekly)

The implication of that statement is that Jane — a renowned astrophysicist — somehow isn’t Thor’s equal because she isn’t as physically strong as he is. That’s sure to rankle some, especially in light of Marvel’s long, less-than-stellar history of casting great actresses in thinly sketched love-interest roles. Although, maybe starting fresh with a new character and actress is the best way forward. For her part, Portman seemed well past the Marvel phase of her career last year, frankly telling the Wall Street Journal, “as far as I know, I’m done.”

While Marvel doesn’t seem to have handled the character of Jane very well, we can hope that Thompson’s Valkyrie is a more fleshed-out female part than those found in many prior MCU movies. To read more about Thor and Jane’s breakup, head over to Entertainment Weekly.

Thor: Ragnarok, starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Benedict Cumberbatch, Cate Blanchett, Idris Elba, Jeff Goldblum, Tessa Thompson, Karl Urban, Mark Ruffalo, and Anthony Hopkins, lands in theaters on Nov. 3.

Read more from Yahoo Movies:

Concerning Doctors: Why It’s High Time the Doctor Wasn’t White

During a wee conversation with @oodlyenough, she pointed out that in the run-up to casting a new Doctor there are usually multiple think pieces on why the Doctor should be played by a woman, but few about why the Doctor should be played by a person of colour.

So I decided to write one.

By the time Peter Capaldi leaves Doctor Who, the Doctor will have been played by a white man for 54 years. That’s enough of a reason to argue a casting change—in a perfect world, that would be the only argument you’d need—but what are some other reasons why the Doctor should be a person of colour?  

In-universe, the Doctor should regenerate in to a person of colour because he can. In The Sarah Jane Adventures, the Eleventh Doctor established that he could regenerate in to “someone who looked like [Clyde Langer]”. We’ve also seen via Romana’s first regeneration that bodies of all sizes and species are available to Time Lords. It’s also canon that the Doctor has little control over his regenerations, and thus it’s a little ridiculous (and unbelievable) that he’s always somehow regenerated in to a white person.

Out-of-universe, the first reason is that it would be good for the BBC to make Doctor Who more diverse. Out of 54 years of main companions, only two of them haven’t been white. And as previously mentioned, all twelve Doctors have been white. It’s a sad statistic for such a long-running show, and if allowed to continue it could be a damning one. At the end of the day, the BBC is a business, and if it doesn’t keep abreast of audience desires and trends, it could risk losing that audience. The landscape of science fiction and TV as a whole is changing, and while fans are loyal that loyalty can be stretched thin. The casual audience, tired of a lily white show, could take its viewing figures elsewhere. Star Trek: Discovery is poised to be an incredibly diverse show. HUMANS and Preacher and Luke Cage have POC leads. Sci-fi film is also getting more diverse, with titles like Pacific Rim and Star Wars: Rogue One choosing to cast people of colour. The longer the BBC clings to Doctor Who’s original format, the more backward it will look. The more viewers it will lose. The less merchandise it will sell. And in the end, the less money it will make. It might not be the most palatable point, but it is a valid one.

The second reason is that, when it comes to championing diversity, Doctor Who has been very good at talking the talk but it needs to walk the walk. Doctor Who may be a show about an alien who flies around in a police box, but it’s also about non-violence, and fairness, and inclusion. It celebrates people’s similarities, and their differences, and its chief villains—the Daleks—are creatures who don’t just kill, but seek to eradicate diversity. These messages can come from a white face, but if it’s only a white face then they start to look a bit hypocritical. They also can only be so powerful, as by walking around as a white man the Doctor makes use of white male privilege. The only reason why he has to convince people to listen to him is because he’s a stranger, not because he’s fighting against a prejudice those people might have. Oh, the audience might know that the Doctor is an alien—and thus could face discrimination—but those characters usually don’t. He passes for a human white man. So when he calls for characters to be less prejudiced, it’s from a distance. When he tackles racism, it’s as someone separate from it. While that distance is an interesting story to explore, it would be even more interesting to see the Doctor truly affected by the things he fights for. To have to fight for a voice or fair treatment because it’s being actively denied him, just like it is for real people of colour. Doctor Who already uses its stories in good ways, but it could go further. It could truly embody the messages it sends.

The third reason is that people of colour deserve to have access to the same rich roles that white people do. The Doctor isn’t just an “alien” character or an “eccentric”. He’s a scientist, and a superhero, and an outcast; he’s a teacher, and a student, and a lover, and a friend. He’s a rebel. He’s the smartest person in the room. A character like that shouldn’t only be available to white people. White people shouldn’t be the only ones who get to play rich, multifaceted characters. And audience deserve to see people of colour in those roles. People of colour are constantly asked to identify with white characters, to look beyond a character’s appearance and find commonalities. POC audiences deserve the same ease with fiction that white people enjoy, and white people need to appreciate and connect with stories that aren’t about us. For once, white people need to do the legwork on Doctor Who, while kids of colour get to rejoice in a hero who looks just like them.

The fourth, and final, reason is that it’s vitally important right now that our heroes aren’t white. You can argue that Doctor Who is escapism and doesn’t have to reflect what’s going on in the real world, but Doctor Who is a popular show with a global reach, and it should use that position to its fullest extent. We now live in a world with Muslim bans and rising white supremacy. After Brexit, hate crime rose by 41%. A village in Hungary wants to be white-only. The world is only getting smaller, and consequently we all need to learn to be more accepting, and it’s clear that messages of acceptance coming purely from white faces is not having the desired effect. Captain America has talked about “standing up for what’s right” and is anti-fascism, but clearly our idea of “what’s right” is skewed. Thor understands that having power doesn’t mean using it to oppress people, but that message is clearly getting lost. By having our heroes be people of colour, there’s the hope that our perceptions of POC will change and those messages will truly be heard. Because let’s be honest: what we see in fiction does affect our real-world perception and our real-world actions. Fiction can, whether creators intend it or not, fuel prejudice. Because fiction does not happen in a vacuum. So if your POC characters rarely have dialogue, or are a stereotype, or are never complete, fully human characters—if POC don’t appear in your story at all—then you can’t be surprised if audiences then have trouble relating to real-life people of colour. It’s not a shock that some white people then struggle with the reality of POC’s humanity, and do hateful things. Fiction is complicit in the shaping of our world, and Doctor Who has the chance to shape it into something better. It can hold people up, truly, if the Doctor was a person of colour.

It boils down to this: as a white person, I feel well represented on Doctor Who. It has spent 54 years giving me people to effortlessly identify with, and showing people who look like me saving the world, and that’s more than enough. It’s time for other fans—for POC fans—to have their turn. It’s time for all kids to see themselves as the hero. So when you talk about who you’d like to play the Doctor, I hope that instead of Tom Hiddleston or Ben Whishaw you think of Ace Bhatti or Nikesh Patel. I hope you think of Nathan Stewart-Jarrett, or Gary Carr, or Tom Wu, or Dan Li; Danny John-Jules or Ray Panthaki; Razza Jaffrey or Riz Ahmed. I hope you remember that the Doctor can be anything, and should. Diversity isn’t a dirty word; it reminds us that we’re all human–far more alike than we are different. And if we’re all alike, then there’s nothing there left to hate.

6

TITAN COMICS AND BBC WORLDWIDE ANNOUNCE NEW MINISERIES STARRING THE FOURTH DOCTOR, AS PLAYED BY TOM BAKER!

The Fourth Doctor And Sarah Jane Smith Return
For An All-New Adventure!

(November 10, 2015, London/New York) Titan Comics and BBC Worldwide are pleased to announce a brand-new mini series starring the Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith, as played by Tom Baker and the late Elisabeth Sladen.

This series expands Titan Comics’ hugely popular and critically acclaimed Doctor Who comics line, which already includes adventures from the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors.

Entitled ‘Gaze Of The Medusa’, the five-part series will hit stores in March 2016 and will be penned by Gordon Rennie (Missionary Man, Judge Dredd) and Emma Beeby (Witch Hunter, Judge Dredd) with art by Brian Williamson (The Twelfth Doctor, Spider-Man, X-Men).

The all-new adventure is set in Victorian England, where a mysterious woman commands a hidden army in a house of the blind. Scryclops stalk the streets…and something alien and terrible screams from prehistory – with a hunger that cannot be satisfied!

Issue #1 will come with six covers to collect: a painted cover by fan-favorite artist Alice X. Zhang; a photo variant; art covers by artists Brian Williamson, Jay Gunn and Matt Baxter; and a blank sketch variant.

Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor #1 debuts in comic stores and on digital devices from March 2016.

omg ok so at balls held in public assemblies during austen’s time, young women had to be chaperoned by either their mother or another older woman who wouldn’t dance, just sit down + talk/play cards etc. 

a quote, from a letter jane austen wrote to her sister cassandra in her late thirties: ‘By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon, for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like.’ Jane Austen my not have had any children but she was living the Wine Mum life #confirmed

9

“Unfortunately, nowadays with film you don’t really get the opportunity to shoot chronologically - unless you’re Boyhood. So I did know from the outset that we weren’t going to have that luxury. So the important thing for me was trying to educate myself on the specifics of the disease, and then I worked with a dancer, a woman called Alex Reynolds, who helped train my body to be able to sustain specific positions for extended periods. The reason I did that all in the four months before filming was so when it came to working with Felicity Jones, who was playing Jane, we could actually just play the human story, the emotional story, and I wasn’t thinking about the specifics and ramifications of motor neurone disease.” Eddie Redmayne on becoming Stephen Hawking.

Is the SU team really just gonna brush off the fact that Steven not only ruined a good thing that Ronaldo had going for him, but broke this poor girl’s heart too? A young woman who wasn’t even involved in that asinine conflict but ended up a casualty anyway!!

They play it for laughs, shrug their shoulders, and say “shit happens”; but this was Steven’s fault from the VERY beginning and he didn’t even so much as apologize!

That’s fucked up Steve-o! That’s FUCKED UP!

She secretly fights monsters, saves the world, has a secret bade, has sidekicks and in generally heroic and awesome. For these reasons Sarah Jane Smith (from Doctor Who and the Sarah Jane Adventures) is one of the greatest female superheroes ever. And when she gets done saving the world she still has time to be a mum too, and they’re pretty damn heroic all by themselves.

It makes me sad that in a world where a character like that, played by a woman in her 60s, can be such a major hit but we still have this mentality that to be an appealing super hero (or character generally) you MUST be male you MUST be young you MUST be single and childfree and there is little leeway outside that.

No middle aged character can be appealing? No characters who’re married can be appealing? No characters who have children can be appealing?

That’s bullshit and limiting

okay but seriously WATCH UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT

1) PRODUCED BY TINA FEY

2) STARRING ELLIE KEMPER, WHO YOU MAY KNOW AS ERIN FROM THE OFFICE OR THE CHEMISTRY TEACHER FROM 21 JUMP STREET

3) CO STAR TITUSS BURGESS IS A WONDERFUL GAY BROADWAY ACTOR PLAYING A WONDERFUL GAY ASPIRING BROADWAY ACTOR

4) ELLIE KEMPER PLAYS KIMMY SCHMIDT, WHO LONG STORY SHORT REFUSES TO BE DEFINED BY HER PAST AND IS ADORABLE WHILE BEING BADASS

5) LOVE OF MY LIFE CAROL KANE AS ANOTHER SEMI CO STAR, WHO YOU MAY KNOW AS OSWALD COBBLEPOT’S MOTHER ON GOTHAM OR MIRACLE MAX’S WIFE IN THE PRINCESS PRIDE (seriously though does this woman age? I  don’t think so.)

6) JANE KRAKOWSKI, JENNA MARONEY ON 30 ROCK, PLAYS A CARICATURE OF A RICH NEW YORKER AND I LOVE AND HATE HER AT THE SAME TIME.

7) ONE OF THE LINES OF THE THEME SONG: FEMALES ARE STRONG AS HELL

8) DID I MENTION IT’S A NETFLIX SHOW? NBC PASSED ON IT (dummies) AND SO NETFLIX PICKED IT UP AND ALL OF S1 IS ON WATCH INSTANTLY.

SERIOUSLY JUST WATCH IT YOU WILL FEEL SO HAPPY ABOUT LIFE

Reasons to watch Blindspot
  • The lead is a kickass woman who’s tattooed from head to toe with clues about future crimes, but cannot remember anything about her past. She suffers from depersonalization and PTSD, but is basically a fucking Navy SEAL. She questions her own identity and morality but her first instinct is to help people.
  • That lead is played by Jaimie Alexander. Come on!
  • The male lead (played by Sullivan Stapleton) respects and believes in Jane. He doesn’t belittle her or baby her. He’s the same with all of the other strong women in his life. And there are many. Also he’s a really tough guy who’s good at his job but loves his family and has a soft spot for kids. Be still my heart!
  • It has a seriously kickass, interesting, amazing plot.
  • There’s loads of action.
  • Eye candy galore in pretty much every member of the cast.
  • The main members of the FBI team consist of 4 women and 2 men. FOUR WOMEN… TWO MEN! That’s twice as many women as men, fam!
  • That leader of that FBI team is a black woman, one of the main agents is a Latina, and another main agent is a black man.
  • Patterson is fucking adorable. Think Garcia from Criminal Minds but not as flirty and also in the form of Ashley Johnson.
  • NAKED. TATTOOED. JAIMIE ALEXANDER!
  • Seriously, watch Blindspot. It’s on NBC Mondays at 10 pm EST.

Jane the Virgin star Gina Rodriguez told TIME last fall that the CW’s charming and groundbreaking new series — which was just renewed for a second season — wouldn’t be a clear-cut story about right and wrong. “There is no black and white, there is definitely grey,” the recent Golden Globe winner said of the show, about a young woman who’s accidentally artificially inseminated during a hospital mix-up. “You start to see how every character, ‘good’ or ‘evil,’ gets redeemed.“

No character on the show, which returns from its winter hiatus on Jan. 19, embodies those words better than Petra Solano, the cheating, soon-to-be-ex-wife of Jane’s love interest, played by Israeli actress Yael Grobglas. Between Rodriguez and Justin Baldoni’s pecs, Jane the Virgin has plenty of breakout talent, but Grobglas’ role as the scheming yet sympathetic foil to Rodriguez’s Jane has turned Petra into one of television’s most amusingly complex comic villains. Fans love to hate her, yet as Jane delves deeper into Petra’s backstory — and shows off her lighter side — they’re starting to love to love her as well.

“I was expecting so many hate tweets, but all I’ve gotten was, ‘She’s so evil, but I really like her and don’t know why!’” Grobglas says. “You never know if you want her to find true love and live happily ever after, or if you want her to be a complicated villain.”