and social sciences

5

The March for Science isn’t just for white lab geeks. It’s about social justice.

  • The March for Science on Saturday is set to be one of the largest interdisciplinary shows of force by biologists, chemists, mathematicians, medical doctors, climatologists and other scientists. 
  • If organizers have done their jobs right, it won’t just be white folks in lab coats.
  • The march will take place in more than 600 locations in the U.S. and around the world on Earth Day. Organizers said it will be “an unprecedented gathering of people standing together to acknowledge and voice the critical role that science plays in each of our lives,” according to an official website. 
  • No doubt, science is at the center of social and racial injustice issues that have sprung up in recent years. Read more. (4/22/17, 10:31 AM)

anonymous asked:

does tony think of peter as a son?

probably not consciously. he treats him kind of like a son sometimes, but that’s not very unusual for tony. tony has to be watched closely or he adopts stray genius children everywhere he goes.

 mostly it’s pretty long distance–he emails and videocalls them, sets up scholarships, funds research, talks them through school problems, introduces them to employers… i know for a fact that at least half of the starkphone beta testers are sleep-deprived students across the country who tony has run into at some convention or facility tour and decided to keep. some of them come to work at Stark Industries eventually, but a fair number go into other fields.

he has a strange ability to pinpoint exactly which kid in any given cluster is an untapped well of talent looking for mentoring. we have a number of bets running on if he’s doing it consciously or not. 

either way, he does it a lot.

he’s not very cuddly or touchy-feely with them, and he gets hilariously defensive if you poke him about it, but he’s actually a really good mentor, and he does really care. i mean, sometimes he uses the ‘do the exact opposite of what i would do’ method of role modelling, but…

What not too many people talk about is how capitalism greatly affects both science and the arts.

By greatly affects i mean purposefully regresses because only certain aspects of both fields are focused on and supported only for their profit-making capabilities and almost never for its necessity, never how it could be used to benefit or enhance humanity, and never for its enjoyment or sense of personal (or communal) self fulfilment.

i cannot stand teachers and schools that care about attendance, if you can get the grades without showing up to the class, the class is useless. If you do not need to show up to learn the material, they should just fucking give you the grade and shut up. Docking people for attendance is fucking making yourself self-important lmao when u clearly aint.

And lets be honest half the time theres a participation part of the class in say a social science class, the participation means listening to people argue about whether or not you’re human. ~wOW SO FUN AND ENLIGHTENING. u sure showed me a lesson about life chad.~

How sleeping helps us learn

Most scientists believe that sleep plays an important role in memory. Getting a good night’s sleep after learning something new seems to help you remember it later, whether it is a new motor skill (like a series of repetitive movements) or a new cognitive skill (like memorizing a poem). The way the brain processes and stores these two types of learning (implicit or explicit) is important to understanding how our brains work with implications for learning, education, and the treatment of diseases involving memory loss.

Knowing that sleep plays a role in all of this is one thing. Understanding exactly how this happens in the brain is another. New research from Edwin Robertson at the University of Glasgow and Jocelyn Breton at the University of California, Berkeley helps clarify the role sleep plays in these two different types of learning.

Participants in the study were asked to play a game like the electronic memory game Simon. They had to push a button on a keyboard that corresponded to one of 4 possible positions of a circle on their screen. All participants received the same 12-item long repeating sequence. In the first group (the explicit learning group), the participants were told that they should try to learn the sequence and were given clues to when the sequence would begin again. In the second group (the implicit learning group) the participants were simply told to push the keys correctly as quickly as possible.

The researchers then used a technique called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) that allows them to temporarily turn off specific neural circuits in the brain to test the role of two circuits in storing the sequence in the brain. After a night of sleep, the participants were then tested to recall as much of the sequence as possible. The researchers found that two independent brain circuits mediate the improvement in explicit and implicit learning that typically occurs with sleep. When the participants learned a skill through the repetitive motion alone, the memory was learned through a circuit in the inferior parietal lobe. When they learned by consciously trying to remember the sequences, the learning was stored through a different circuit in the primary motor cortex. This suggests that awareness of learning, even the same sequence, can alter the circuit supporting learning and subsequent memory enhancement over sleep. Overall, the same memory enhancement over a night of sleep can be achieved through different circuits.

This work was published this week in Nature Human Behaviour.

anonymous asked:

Hi! Do you have any tips for studying for a subject you absolutely despise? ((looking at you Social Science -.-)) anyway, if you would have any tips that would be a great help! Thanks <3

Hey! Omg yes, my little demon was maths + corporations law fml. I’m sure everyone has a subject they absolutely hate with a fervent passion but have to get through. 

Here’s a few tips for studying a subject that you absolutely despise: 

1. Do the bare minimum 

Lol, let’s be honest here. There’s going to be subjects that you love and there’s going to be subjects that you hate. You don’t have to love every subject that you study - all you have to do is pass. 

So, canvass your syllabus/ course outline and see what you’re going to be examined on. Tab the relevant sections of your textbook and ignore the rest. Look at the broad areas of your course and how much weighting they’re given (e.g. the number of weeks dedicated to studying that portion, the assessment %, the type of questions in practice exams). 

Often you’ll find you’ve just condensed the course to about… well ¾ of your textbook/ reading materials. And out of those chapters, its not like you need to memorise all of it - just the key concepts (see: the intro, the conclusion and probably one body paragraph outlining the key example). 

All those extra readings? Fuck it. That set of extra essays or ‘areas of academic interest’? Screw that. If its not going to make up a huge portion of your examinable content, leave it to one side. 

Condense the course to the bare minimum you need to study so that you can pass. Sure, it’ll be an ugly, barely scraped through pass, but hell that’s all you need.

Use that time for a subject you enjoy. 

PASS, THEN MOVE ON.

2. Leech off someone who enjoys the subject (this includes your teacher)  

Sometimes, its a matter of finding what other people love about it. Finding a friend or another student who is passionate about the subject you hate, asking them what the enjoy about it or heck, just seeing their enthusiasm may help you appreciate the subject. Sure, you’re not going to love it but heck, at least you understand the appeal.

+ people who are passionate about a subject tend to love sharing their knowledge. Engage in casual conversation, ask them questions about areas you’re struggling with etc. 

And they may even point to an area or a niche area of the subject that may pique your interest. This leads me to my next tip…. 

3. Putting it into context 

Sometimes we hate a subject when we can’t put it into context - e.g. “what the fuck is the point of learning how to transform a fucking graph!” 

Ask someone what they love about a subject. Maybe they know an advanced application of what you’re learning that leads to an area of interest. 

Google shit. Youtube shit. Maybe you’ll find a small aspect that may help you appreciate the subject. Because the mere study of the subject doesn’t necessarily reflect its practical application. For example, I found contract law extremely boring and dry – it wasn’t until I started working in the area and realised how these contracts affected the buildings/ events/ my general day to day life that I really began to enjoy contract law. 

4. Be strict with your time

When you have a subject you hate, its easy to put it off to one side. Be strict with your time. Allocate a set time period to do your required homework/ reading etc. Clear your desk of any other subject, books etc phone. Anything not related to that subject goes out the fucking door. 

Start small - maybe 30 mins. After your allotted time is up - MOVE ON. The pomodoro method may help in this regard (see an intro post to the method by @etudiance

When you start out, it may be that you spend those 30 mins staring blankly at a book. But by day 6, with routine and time, you’ll eventually start slowly chipping away at what you need to do. 

As to the sequence…. I liked sticking it in between studying two subjects I enjoyed. So I could start my study session with something I liked, then do my allocated hour of doom and have something to look forward to later. 

5. Find a different way to study the same shit 

This depends on your study method tbh. But perhaps find a new way to study what you don’t enjoy - whether that be swapping out those flashcards for a mindmap, dictating as opposed to writing shitones of notes, youtubing videos on the concept etc. 

However, this doesn’t mean procrastinating. Don’t kid yourself - spending ‘3 hours to tidy up your desk before you start work so you can be productive later’ isn’t going to achieve your goal. You’re just putting off your work. Same with re writing the heading of your notes 10 times so you can get the right colours and fonts. 

Rather, space that ‘productive procrastination’ out between your study. Have a 30 min ‘preparation session’ before you study where you clean your desk, get all your supplies, draw up your headings. If you don’t finish, tough - relegate the rest of that prep in your breaks. Move on and get cracking with studying. 

6. Reward yourself! 

After you’ve finished that chapter? DO SOMETHING YOU LIKE. NON STUDY RELATED. Preferably healthy. 

+ heck, sometimes the motivation that comes with nailing 3 exam questions in a row is enough to keep your confidence and momentum up. 

Here’s a few more pointers from some other studyblrs! 

If you want specific resources re: social science give me another shout and I can dig some up (wasn’t sure what level you’re studying at), or check out some studyblr community lists etc (e.g. @studyblrindex) and I’m sure there’s someone who will be happy to help out (OR SCREAM INTO THE ABYSS TOGETHER W. YOU) 

All the best!  

medium.com
The ‘Alt-Left’ Only Exists To Liberals
Intellectual dishonesty: avoiding critically honest and comprehensive approach to a matter because it may introduce an adverse effect on…
By Devyn Springer

My Latest: On the myth of the “Alt-Left,” identity politics, and liberalism. 

The conflation of the left with liberalism is a method of neoliberalism in the preservation of capitalism. It is within this conflation of leftism and liberalism, whether subconsciously through lack of proper political education or purposefully for the obfuscation of their own centrist positionality, the liberal creation of the “alt-left” is part of the historical assault on the left by those willfully apt to compromise with fascism. This conflation, or equalization if you will, of the left with the alt-right — or, as most leftists refer to them, neo-nazis — illuminates the dedication to inaction that is so deeply inherent to liberal politics.

[…]

To claim an “alt-left” is to position something as “alternative” to a main framework of larger ideology. However, this logical progression falls flat when examining what exactly this particular “alt-left” is alternative to: the center.To whom does the “alt-left” exist? Liberals, who sit at the center, comfortable in their inaction and collusion with the right. Liberals, who Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously described as preferring “a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice.” The “alt-left” is not a problem, James Wolcott, because it does not exist. If anything, liberals operating under the framework of neoliberalism, more dedicated to capital than protecting the lives of the marginalized, are the biggest problem to my liberation as a Black queer socialist warrior. So please, continue to cheer ‘go, State, go[sic]’ as you vilify the only functioning piece of resistance in a country built on the degradation of my ancestors, and is sustained through my exploitation.

I’m just so terrified that my children will never be able to experience nature as it is with all the animals and diversity and plants and insects and forests and snow because this generation didn’t wake up.