and people of all religions

special shoutout to all of the str8/Christian ppl in my social work class who felt the need yesterday to tell me that i don’t need labels and that they love gay people despite their sins

Today is International Women’s Day.

Today also marks the show of solidarity for women’s rights by way of a strike: A Day Without A Woman. Women around the world are refusing to take part in both paid and unpaid labor in the name of justice for all gender-oppressed people of all ethnicities, religions, and sexualities. In doing so, they join the ranks of women who have led protests, strikes, and movements throughout history.

Let’s celebrate a few of those women:

Dorothy Height (March 24, 1912—April 20, 2010)

Originally posted by womenthrive

Dorothy Height, former President of the National Council of Negro Women, was one of the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington. She stood near Martin Luther King Jr. during his “I Have a Dream” speech, but did not publicly speak that day. In fact, no woman publicly spoke. “Even on the morning of the march there had been appeals to include a woman speaker,” wrote Height in her memoir. “They were happy to include women in the human family, but there was no question as to who headed the household!“ In 1971, she helped found the National Women’s Political Caucus with other notable feminists like Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.

Marsha P. Johnson (August 24, 1945—July 6, 1992)

Originally posted by dannisue

Marsha P. Johnson spent her entire adult life fighting for the rights of LGBTQ people. She’s credited for being one of the first to fight back in the Stonewall Riots. She started the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries with her friend Sylvia Rivera. Together they provided food, shelter, and care to young drag queens, trans women, and homeless children in need in the Lower East Side of NYC. She fought for what was right, and knew how to live life with exuberance and humor. When asked by a judge what what the “P” stood for, she replied “Pay It No Mind.”

Alice Paul (January 11, 1885—July 9, 1977)

Originally posted by taryndraws

Alice Paul was one of the leading forces behind the Nineteenth Amendment, which affirmed and enshrined a woman’s right to vote. She rallied 8,000 people to march in the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington—no small task in a world before the internet—with an estimated half million people watching the historic moment from the sidelines.

And some good activist blogs to follow:

  • Emily’s List (@emilys-list) slogan is “ignite change.” They aim to do so by backing pro-choice candidates for US office in key races across the country.
  • Women of Color in Solidarity (@wocinsolidarity) focuses on being a hub for the the WOC experience in the US. Original posts, incredibly informative reblogs…this place is wonderful.

a quick post: do not use the term ‘sin’ or whatever the fuck to refer to LGBT couples in fan fiction or cannon or anything just don’t do that to young LGBT kids who see themselves in those characters and don’t do that to all the LGBT people who have been shunned and attacked with religion as an excuse I don’t care if you think it’s funny and I don’t care if you don’t think it’s offensive and I literally!!!!! do not care about the feelings of straight people over LGBT people!!!! and!!! I never will!!!!

"This Generation is too Sensitive"

Things baby-boomers find and/or found offensive.

1) Someone sitting down during a song

2) Interracial couples

3) People asking police not to execute innocent unarmed people

4) Same-sex couples

5) A black president

6) Black people sitting at the front of the bus

7) People saying “Hey if you could say ‘he’ instead of ‘she’ that’d be super"

8) Black people sitting in the same diner as them

9) People not speaking the same language as them at all times

10) Women’s breasts

11) People having a different religion than them

12) Women working

13) People saying “Happy Holidays”

14) Not being allowed to beat and/or rape their wives

15) Corporations not pandering to their religion

16) Black people attending the same school as them

17) Governments not pandering to their religion

18) Indigenous people having rights

19) People calling racists “racists”

20) People having AIDS

21) People calling homophobes “homophobes”

22) Single mothers

23) Schools teaching science instead of their religion’s dogma

24) Atheists

25) Being told they can’t hit their children

26) The mentally ill not being locked up and tortured

But suuuuuuure this generation is the easily offended one.

Reblog If Your Blog is A Safe and Welcoming Place For People of All Races, Genders, Ethnicities, Religions, and Sexual Orientations
170304 Fancafe Update

“We are extremely sorry for our insensitive actions and use of blackface in our video while portraying Bruno Mars. There is no excuse for what we did and there are not enough words to explain how regretful we are. We are heartbroken to have hurt our international K-Pop fans so deeply.

We love and care so much for all people of every color, race, sexuality, religion, and gender. We love all our fans and are so sorry to have hurt our fans in the black community.

We understand now why our actions were wrong and we never meant to do harm with our video. We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions.

We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.

Thank you so much for bringing this to our attention and allowing us to right the wrongs that we have done.”

— MAMAMOO 

cnn.com
There is an underground network preparing to hide immigrants
Faith leaders in California don't have hope President Donald Trump won't enter churches or places of worship where immigrants may seek sanctuary. So they are building safe houses and preparing rooms to hide immigrants who fear ICE will deport them.
By Kyung Lah, Alberto Moya and Mallory Simon, CNN

A hammer pounds away in the living room of a middle class home. A sanding machine smoothes the grain of the wood floor in the dining room.

But this home Pastor Ada Valiente is showing off in Los Angeles, with its refurbished floors, is no ordinary home.

“It would be three families we host here,” Valiente says.

By “host,” she means provide refuge to people who may be sought by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE. The families staying here would be undocumented immigrants, fearing an ICE raid and possible deportation.

The purchase of this home is part of a network formed by Los Angeles religious leaders across faiths in the wake of Donald Trump’s election. The intent is to shelter hundreds, possibly thousands of undocumented people in safe houses across Southern California.

The goal is to offer another sanctuary beyond religious buildings or schools, ones that require federal authorities to obtain warrants before entering the homes.

“That’s what we need to do as a community to keep families together,” Valiente says.

At another Los Angeles neighborhood miles away, a Jewish man shows off a sparsely decorated spare bedroom in his home. White sheets on the bed and the clean, adjacent full bathroom bear all the markers of an impending visit. The man, who asked not to be identified, pictures an undocumented woman and her children who may find refuge in his home someday.

The man says he’s never been in trouble before and has difficulty picturing that moment. But he’s well educated and understands the Fourth Amendment, which gives people the right to be secure in their homes, against unreasonable searches and seizures. He’s pictured the moment if ICE were to knock on his door.

“I definitely won’t let them in. That’s our legal right,” he says. “If they have a warrant, then they can come in. I can imagine that could be scary, but I feel the consequences of being passive in this moment is a little scary.”

The “Bubble”

I hear a lot of bullshit about living in “bubbles” here in the United States. Specifically, I hear about how we live in liberal or conservative bubbles, where we only hear viewpoints similar to ours, and this is detrimental.

I really hate this bullshit.

I grew up in a predominantly white, predominantly Christian, very affluent suburb. The majority of minority students in my school system were East and South Asian. My extracurriculars kept me surrounded by a similar demographic.

Then I moved to the city. Through my academic and professional life, I began to interact with a shitload of people who were not originally from the United States, but came here to study, to teach, to practice medicine, to do research. I began to interact with people who were born here, but who were first generation Americans.

And just walking around and living in the city, I began to interact with people of all classes, ethnicities, countries of origin, religions, and so on and so forth. It is normal to me to be on the train and hear conversations in Spanish, in Chinese, in Arabic. It is normal for me to see signage in different languages. It is normal for me to pass by stores that sell Indian bridalwear, or a Russian pharmacy, or a Chinese specialty food shop.

Normal. Normal. Normal.

One day this past fall, I was sitting and waiting for the bus. An older woman sat beside me and began to talk to me (at me, to be honest; I don’t make conversation with strangers most of the time). She complained about how climate change meant that she had to drive out to another part of the state to see the leaves change, to experience a proper autumn. She said, despairingly, that you just couldn’t see the change in the city.

I commented that I’d grown up in a rural suburb, where I’d gotten to experience the spectacular leaf change she was talking about, but I preferred to live in the city.

“Why?” she’d asked.

“Well, public transit,” I explained. “I don’t have to have a car anymore. And there are stores everywhere and lots of great places to eat. And it’s much more diverse. I grew up in a mostly white suburb–not very diverse.”

As the bus pulled up, she asked me, “Why would diversity be important?”

I was a little stunned that anyone would even think to ask that question, so I didn’t have a ready response. Luckily, once we got on the bus, the conversation was over, so I could just curl up in a seat and relax till I got to my stop. But her question bothered me, and it wasn’t until the election that I could articulate an answer.

Diversity fosters empathy.

That’s not to say that you can’t be empathetic if you don’t grow up in a diverse area. I didn’t grow up in a diverse area, and I’d like to think I’m still empathetic. But diversity absolutely fosters empathy.

So when people talk about bubbles, I call bullshit. I’m a progressive liberal for a lot of reasons, and one major reason is that I live in a diverse city, and I work in a diverse field. That is not a bubble. That is not the same as being surrounded by like on a regular basis, and being afraid of the Other.

Sharing political ideals is not living in a bubble. Subscribing to factual news is not living in a bubble. Refusing to tolerate fascist bullshit and cutting people out of your life when they espouse it?

Not living in a bubble.

there is nothing at all you can say to a person to change their mind on a belief if they do not wish to change their mind themselves. the only thing that works, is your behaviour, the way you interact with them, your akhlaaq. their fitrat will want to connect with you if it senses humanity. become a decent human being first, then worry about doing inviting others to the right path.

Stop the assumption that polyamory is synonymous with kinkster.

Stop the assumption that polyamory is synonymous with polygamy.

Stop the assumption that it’s okay to go up to any poly person and suggest a three-some, orgy, ect.

Stop the assumption that poly people should be up to having sex with anyone, any way, at any time.

Stop the assumption that poly people are sex machines who are dtf 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Stop the assumption that poly people are broken, or have been (emotionally, physically, mentally, or sexually) abused.

Stop the assumption that being poly is “just a phase” until “that special one” comes along.

Stop the assumption that poly people can’t commit.

Stop the assumption that poly people in monogamous relationships, or who are single “aren’t really poly”.

Stop the assumption that poly people all have the same background, race, religion, gender, and/or sexuality.

Stop the assumption that there is only one way to do polyamory.

Fact: The bisexual community includes people of all genders: male, female, and nonbinary; cis and trans. It includes people of all ages, races, and religions, people who are totally closeted, out to everyone, or somewhere in between. Bisexuals can marry people of any gender. We are monogamous or polyamorous, and sometimes ace or aro. All of us are equally bisexual and all of us belong.

Mamamoo’s apology

“We are extremely sorry for our insensitive actions and use of blackface in our video while portraying Bruno Mars. There is no excuse for what we did and there are not enough words to explain how regretful we are. We are heartbroken to have hurt our international K-Pop fans so deeply.

We love and care so much for all people of every color, race, sexuality, religion, and gender. We love all our fans and are so sorry to have hurt our fans in the black community.

We understand now why our actions were wrong and we never meant to do harm with our video. We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions.

We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.

Thank you so much for bringing this to our attention and allowing us to right the wrongs that we have done.”

— MAMAMOO

edit #2 15/12/2015: the context for this post is that in 2014, while my atheist ass was chilling with my Catholic family, i started thinking about how Christmas, despite being marketed as a non-religious holiday and celebrated in the western world by people of all religions these days, still contains elements that are clearly Christian - the word “Christ” literally being in the name, nativity scenes in Santa parades, songs about the birth of Christ - and wondering if that created any dissonance for non-Christians. i made a flippant post about it which got zero notes.

fast-forward to december 2015, i’ve grudgingly slid into agnosticism over the past year, i find this post in my xmas tag and reblog it, intending to start a conversation with any mutuals online. a few Christian-raised mutuals get the joke and reblog it without commentary. it starts to gather notes and a few people are angry at what they think is a lack of sensitivity towards the fact that Christmas is shoved down everyone’s throats, so i make the first edit (at the end of the post), not realising the original is circulating fast. three days later it has 20k notes and i’m drowning.

this post wasn’t an angry one, it wasn’t mocking or attacking non-Christians. i’m fully aware of Christianity’s frequently violent and hateful history, and the pagan roots of the holiday. i was raised entirely aware of the large gap in what the Catholic Church preaches and what the Catholic Church does, and i have, actually, questioned its teachings for most of my life, identifying as an atheist since i was eight. i haven’t been brainwashed or lied to and i don’t think everyone should have to listen to my “made-up book” (thanks, militant atheist tumblr). i know Santa isn’t in the Bible, thanks for that shocking revelation.

to everyone who took the post in the spirit in which it was intended: thank you for your stories about how you celebrate Christmas, they’re really sweet. i am genuinely happy that Christmas is a holiday celebrated by a wide variety of people for a wide variety of reasons. i’m going to publish the stories i already have, but i can’t guarantee i’ll publish anymore (though this post seems to be slowing down, thank God).

this is the last thing i ever want to say about this, so if i get any more hate about it i’ll just link to this post. merry Christmas everyone, and a happy New Year.


what’s christmas even like in non-christian families? in completely non-religious families? like what do you tell your children? “well, kids, we’re eating a whole lot of food and spending a fuckton of money spoiling you because some other people somewhere believe their holy lord and saviour and the greatest person to walk the earth was born 2000 years ago. here’s a playstation.”


edit: all sarcasm in this post was directed at the commercialisation of this day, which i am fully aware is due to the actions of the race who forced this religion on nearly the whole world in this first place. it wasn’t directed at non-christians and i would genuinely like to know how non-christians who celebrate christmas explain the holiday to their children, if anyone would like to share.

The word ‘Judaism’ is not parallel to the word 'Christianity.’ It is, rather, parallel to the word 'Hellenism.’ Just as Hellenism is the culture of the Greek people, so is Judaism the culture of the Jewish people. A culture is much more than a religion. It embraces all the customs and creativity of a community. Judaism, as the culture of the Jewish people, is as comfortable with Yiddish jokes as with the psalms. It is as interested in folk customs as in rabbinic laws. It is as fascinated with the secular present as with the religious past. The celebration of Judaism pays tribute to all of Jewish culture.
—  Sherwin Wine

I don’t celebrate Easter (in the Christian way) but I’m watching an Easter ceremony on tv and it’s so beautiful. I don’t understand non-religious people who sh*t on religion because as long as people aren’t using it to hurt others then why would you have a problem with a bunch of people that have found happiness and hope in something they fully believe in? It’s genuinely so moving to see all these people of different ages singing together and taking the time out to attend. I hope it’s not out of line to say that it’s also really beneficial to people who aren’t religious? Not to try to change the meaning of the celebration, but even to someone who has no religion at all, there is something so inspiring and uplifting about seeing people come together to celebrate and give thanks. 

We’re so lucky to have people of all different religions here (in the UK) and I think it enriches us. We should appreciate that we’re all different, that some of us believe and some of us don’t, and that the ones that do have different ways of expressing that. 

Sorry this post is kind of unnecessary, but basically the point is that religion can be really beautiful and helps a lot of people, so I don’t see why those of us that are non-religious have to try and put it down or ‘disprove’ it, so long as it’s not hurting anyone. 

I am very fascinated by religion, as you can tell. So I try to have characters–Stormlight is a good example. I wanted to have characters who are on all different types of spectrums. You’ve got Kaladin who’s agnostic. It’s basically the classic “I don’t know if there’s a god. If there is, I’m angry at him.” You’ve got Dalinar, who’s a reformist. He’s a Martin Luther, he’s a Mohammed, he’s a Joseph Smith. You know, “Religion is not doing what it needs to right now, we need to expand this.” You’ve got someone like Navani who’s a traditionalist, who wants the old religion to really work, who is trying to reconcile this. You’ve got Jasnah who is straight-up atheist. And then you’ve got someone more like Taravangian who would claim to be an atheist, but what he’s done is taken something nonreligious and ascribed religion to it, sort of like Confucianism, where something that was a philosophy is turning into a religion. And I try to get people on all sides of this thing. And also the religions. You’ve got the Alethi, you’ve got the Passions, you’ve got different ways to approach it, because I think that makes for a more interesting story when you like all these people and then they disagree.

and another thing, before anyone starts to say that islam is a religion of misogyny.

islam =/= eastern culture.

please stop generalising “islam as being the religion all poc follow”. people in the east are not all muslims. they can be of so many several different faiths, and they all have the EASTERN CULTURE which is the common factor.

and the eastern culture, not islam the religion, but EASTERN CULTURE, has generally always been a terribly terribly sexist culture. we can admit to that, because it is true, and the history of our culture shows that the eastern culture has always been a very sexist culture with the way our woc have been treated in the past, and unfortunately, still are today.

but islam? or any other religion? no. religion is not misogynistic. it is culture that is.