and other ones will not even show

Confession: Isabela is sosososoooooo important to me. She has confidence in herself and doesn’t take anyone’s shit. She showed me that you need to love yourself, something that I really needed to hear when I was playing DA2, but no one was there to tell me that. Those were pretty rough times, but I won’t go into details. Also, she’s not nearly as shallow as some claim her to be (even if she says so herself). As much as I love the other LIs, she will always be my favourite.

So D.O. is the only member who didn’t show his powers. He is also the only member who was calm and didn’t run. Instead, he got a freaking car. He has the marbles at the end even. So my theory is that D.O. was controlling all of EXO since the beginning. He was the one who put them in the maze. In other words…D.O. IS EVIL IN REAL LIFE AND IN THE CONCEPTS! SATANSOO RULES EVERYWHERE!

OKay, we are already having drama…

If you do not like the video, fine, it is really understandable because no one can take such emotional and disturbing scenes. If you like it, good for you.

But if you do not, you cannot just simply send hate to the band. I am absolutely sure they did not mean to offend anybody with their video, especially Bill. Perhaps they just showed another way of living, trying to persuade others to stop using drugs and to renounce at that kind of life. If you find yourself in this situation, then you can see their video as a motivational one. Yes, you can “feel it all” by using drugs/ cutting/ prostitution/ etc, but as you all saw in the video, everything has its negative effects.

SO please, do not blame the band for what you have seen!

and even more, you do not have the right to dispute over Bill’s sexuality after that raping/prostituing scene.

anonymous asked:

Yeah and i also love that they seem to be a lot closer lately? At least that's my impression.

(This is about TaeKey, I think…)

I think they’ve always been close! 

Since debut days, Kibum has always been fond of Taemin and has always had a sweet spot for him. Taemin definitely gets away with things that other members could never do in front of/with Kibum XD Kibum is just really forgiving when it comes to Taemin and it shows, even if in the last years he has been trying to hide it and stop spoiling Taemin, it’s still evident when you see them interact. If you compare old moments and new ones, and pay attention to Kibum’s expression when he looks at Taemin, you’ll realize that it hasn’t changed. Kibum always listens to Taemin speaking with this expression and then you can see it written all over his face that he still thinks Taemin is the cutest thing that has happened in all his life (you can see the same exact reactions in this video) LOL 

Sometimes I feel like he has an hard time stopping himself from squealing at Taemin, like he did here

Kibum acts in a cuter or “softer” way around Taemin and is affectionate towards him in a very caring way, that is hardly shown around anybody else: x, x, x, x, x (he’s carressing his hair), x (forever caressing his hair).

On the other hand, Taemin tries to catch Kibum’s attention by pranking him or being cute around him All.The.Time. No shit. Just some examples: x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x.

They also kept this hold habit of never really holding hands and doing this instead

And Kibum is probably going to carry Taemin around forever lmao Even though Taemin tries it too sometimes XD

Then there’s also their less platonic side: x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x (taemin trying to kiss key for a moment there), x, x, x. People often say TaeKey is the crack ship of SHINee, that there can’t be nothing beyond family like relationship between them, but I don’t agree. Maybe when Taemin was still a kid, but because Kibum allows Taemin to do everything he wants and Taemin maybe innocently or maybe not so innocently spoils that privilege, their dynamic is unique and extremely interesting to me ♥__♥

- Admin V

invaliduser118 asked:

Do you usually come across crappy kickstarters that are trying to fund movies? Do you see any ground rules in regards to funding a movie that would keep it from being sleazy/making the person behind it look like a jerk? Also, do you have collection of sad dog photos? I don't really need to see one, I'm just curious.

off the top of my head:

1. you should own the intellectual property of whatever you’re making a movie about. i know that sounds basic, but the most recent movie kickstarter as of writing is this random goober asking for $2 million to make a movie about the TV show Charmed

2. you should have done all the necessary pre-production work before even posting it. you should have a script, a budget, a grasp of what equipment and locations you’ll need. in other words, you should show that you have a feasible plan for using strangers’ money to make your movie, that you aren’t just going to buy an expensive camera and drive around with your stoner friend bryce and “let magic happen”

3. you and your collaborators should know what the hell they’re doing. if you want money to rent or buy professional film equipment, you should know how to use it

4. put a lot of effort into the kickstarter video. if you’re saying you know how to shoot, light, write, edit, etc, then you should prove that by making a video that doesn’t look like it was shot in a cave in waziristan.

5. please have made other films, shorts, skits, etc that you can show your potential donors. at the very least, have storyboards

6. don’t do shit about zombies or video game’s or other nerd crap

that’s it i guess. good luck with your movie!!!!!

Ok, I just want to say something because I see people who are thinking that the Bethfoot shot could have been deliberate because tptb were worried about all the spoilers leaking so they asked Emily to come down to Georgia and be caught to throw people off.

Keep reading

Chaos is an Angel
read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1GxQXvW

by thepeachtree

When Dean is kicked out of his dad’s house, he goes to live with his Uncle Bobby. He starts a new high school, where he meets Castiel Novak, who’s actually more of a good guy than he’d like others to believe.

“Even though I’m nice to you, I’m still a badass.” Castiel pouted one day, while he and Dean were watching TV at Cas’ house. “I think you’re forgetting that I had a rock hard reputation before you showed up.”

Dean had just rolled his eyes. “Says the one who likes to be the little spoon, has a bee plushie in the back of his closet and cried last night when we were watching that documentary on ancient Egypt.”

“I’m a rebellious, punk badass and don’t you forget it.” Cas had replied, jabbing Dean with his elbow. “And it’s not a bee plushie, it’s a gang symbol.”

Words: 20941, Chapters: 1/1, Language: English



read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1GxQXvW

Okay, please please please do not take this as offensive but does anyone else realize sex is almost never seen as a ‘love’ thing on this show?

I mean people on this show have sex for various reasons but it’s almost never about love and just wanting to be close to someone. Even when the people on the show are ‘in love’ (V and Kev, Fiona and Jimmy/Steve for example) the sex scenes aren’t about the two people making love. It’s about making a baby, or kinky sex, or one of them wants the other to hurry up because the other has to make lunch for the kids……99.999 % of the time the sex scenes  aren’t about intimacy. I guess that’s why it doesn’t bother me that we don’t see gallavich  ‘doing it/having sex/making love’, whatever you want to call it. We know it’s happening, lol. When it is happening though, it’s because they are actually having a emotional as well as physical connection……unlike most of the other couples reasoning for doing the dirty, lol. So, I don’t know sue me, lol (not really I have very little, lmao) it doesn’t bother me not to see full blown sex scenes with our favorite guys. I’d rather know that the emotional intimacy is there while their having sex and not see it…….then see it and have that connection diminished. *shrugs*

Interviewing ultra-secretive Steven Moffat about Sherlock is a tricky endeavor, given that the writer-producer would prefer to say nothing at all about what will happen in the show’s hugely anticipated fourth season. But during our wide-ranging recent interview, the Sherlock co-creator gave us a few hints about what to expect when the BBC/PBS Masterpiece fan-favorite series returns. Plus, he addressed the long wait between seasons, took a little dig at that other Holmes show—CBS drama Elementary—and even gave a suprirsingly passionate defense of Fifty Shades of Grey.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So, what do you feel comfortable telling us about season 4—or “series” 4, as it’s called in the U.K.?
STEVEN MOFFAT: There are answers coming to questions which nobody has asked. There’s one thing that no one has really brought up…

Can you say what the question is?
No. We’ve actually set up something, I think—[co-creator Mark Gatiss] and me, we’re very exultant about a little thing we’ve set up that no one is talking about.

The episodes get so heavily analyzed it’s surprising that fans have overlooked something.
It’s not that we’re being clever. We never know. Sometimes people go mad for one thing we think is quiet trivial and completely ignore something we think is standing right in front of you.

What distinguishes season 4 from previous years?
We haven’t started writing it yet, so it’s early. The first series was all about the beginning of their friendship. Second about the formative stages, the love and fear and loss and all that. The third was good days, me and my pal and my pal’s wife. Those are golden days. The missing element in a lot of Sherlock Holmes adaptations is allowing it to be funny. There’s a lot of humor in Sherlock Holmes, and it’s ignored in a lot of adaptations. [Season 4] is going to be… I suppose you’d say… consequences. It’s consequences. Chickens come to roost. It’s dark in some ways—obviously it’s great fun and a Sherlock Holmes romp and all that—but there’s a sense of… things… coming back to bite you. It’s not a safe, sensible way to live. It’s hilarious and exhilarating some days, but some days it’s going to be bloody frightening.

Is it more serialized than previous seasons?  
Probably. A lot of serialization is latent, isn’t it? It’s hidden. Series 3 doesn’t look very serialized, but you look back at how much we’re setting up Mary [Amanda Abbington] to be who she turns out to be. It will be three stand-alone films, 90 minutes each, and an ongoing mystery, as there sort of always is.

How will fans feel after watching it?
Hmmm… desperate for series 5. We’re certainly going to put them through the mill. It’s going to be more of an emotional upheaval. Hopefully enjoyable and fun, all the things Sherlock must always be. It will be tough at times. Maybe that’s the word? A tougher series.

Intense?
Intense is probably right. You can sort of see that in the way series 3 went. It’s great that he’s back and John’s [Martin Freeman] got a wife and Sherlock [Benedict Cumberbatch] likes her and isn’t it adorable, and then it all goes to hell. Remember where we left them.

Season three was known for having some bold tonal shifts. There was the meta-fun of “The Empty Herse,” the rom-com of “The Sign of Three,” the thriller of “His Last Vow.” In season 2, “The Hounds of Baskerville” was a bit of a horror story. I’m wondering if you’re doing the Sherlock version of other genres in series 4?
To a degree, you always do, yes. We’re trying to [be] as varied in tone as the stories are. Everybody tends to think of the Hollywood version of Sherlock Holmes. The films tend to be like Hound of the Baskervilles, with horror and crime. You go to the stories and Moriarty is only in one of them. Quite often, Sherlock is investigating small domestic crimes, and quite often there’s no crime at all, and there’s a lot of humor. So “The Sign of Three” you might think is a huge departure for Sherlock Holmes if you don’t know Sherlock Holmes very well. But it’s not. The mysteries he solves, and the level of humor and the interaction with Sherlock and Watson is sort of right.

Last season in particular, I felt like you were almost trying to break Benedict Cumberbatch by giving him tougher and tougher challenges, acting-wise, and then watching him pull it off. Have you found new ways to stretch and challenge Holmes for series 4, and is that something you consciously think about?
The reason we still have Benedict and Martin is we still give them acting challenges. Otherwise they wouldn’t come and play with us. They don’t need the money. What we give them in terms of money isn’t something they’d regard as a significant fee anymore. We’re making this in a shed in Wales. We think really carefully about giving them something to play because they’re both amazing actors. Normally if you watch a show, [the characters] tend to narrow as the people who make the show tend to know what works. When I was doing series 3, I went and looked at Martin and Benedict’s other performances to remind myself of what else they do. I watched the British The Office again.

So good.
So unbelievably good. I hadn’t quite realized the extent he plays the lead in that. It reminds you that he’s got all that too. I can bring in other colors to it.

This might be a trickier question than I’m intending it to be: Given the popularity of Andrew Scott’s character, have you ever regretted “killing” off Moriarty?
We knew we had to be bold about that. We knew what we wanted to do. Moriarty is only in one story, “The Final Problem,” and has a flashback appearance in another. The story of Sherlock Holmes isn’t Sherlock vs. a criminal mastermind. It just isn’t. So we wanted to have a huge story for “The Final Problem,” but kill him… we knew what we wanted the consequences of that moment to be. Andrew became a star overnight. He became a star based on the smallest amount of screen time ever—he’s not actually in it that much. He’s hardly in the first series at all. Even “The Reichenbach Fall,” when I was doing a pass on [the script], I added a couple scenes because he’s got to show up more. He’s always asking, “Do I get a flashback? Am I going to show up again?”

Last year the distribution window between Britain and U.S. premiere of Sherlock was shortened, but there was still a bit of a gap. Recently HBO announced that Game of Thrones will premiere simultaneously in 130 countries. You would think Sherlock could premiere simultaneously in two countries, right?
I really, really do think it should. I think it’s absolute bloody nonsense. The audience is not prepared to wait. [Somebody] recently said, “If I want something and it’s not available, I think it’s the vendor’s fault.” With Doctor Who we pretty much have that—certainly with Britain and America, it comes out the same day. Doing that ended an awful lot of the piracy. Yes, it should be. But that’s a question for PBS and Masterpiece.

You mentioned your budget. I wondered whether, given how the show is this international sensation, the new season has a bigger budget.
The reality is no. I’m fighting tooth and nail on both shows to get enough money to make them. It’s hugely frustrating and annoying at times because they couldn’t be more successful.

Last I checked, you were swayed that a Sherlock and Doctor Who crossover is not a good idea and won’t happen. Any movement on that?
My instinct—and this is probably from years of doing Doctor Who—is I’m just such a tart. If people want to, we should give it to them. But I got persuaded by Mark, Benedict, [executive producer Sue Vertue] and Martin saying, “Look, it will never be as good as they think it’s going to be,” and then I say, “Yes, but we’ll just bang it out and make it as good.” “Yeah, but you can’t give everybody everything they want all the time.” I’m in the camp of giving them everything they want. But I think they’re sane and right and I’m just a tart.

What’s the best or funniest piece of Sherlock fan fiction or fan art you’ve seen?
I don’t know the funniest. There’s been some eye-watering stuff of Benedict and Martin together. A load of it has been superb. There’s a tendency to disparage it. I don’t agree. Even the slash fiction, that’s a great way to learn to work. No one really does three-act structure, but just trying to put words that make somebody else turned on, that’s going to teach you more about writing than any writing college you can go to. It’s creative and exciting. I refuse to mock it—because I’m a man who writes Sherlock Holmes fan fiction for a living!

It’s how we ended up with Fifty Shades of Grey, after all.
People want to be mocking of that. But bloody hell, that’s amazing—that [EL James] turned her fandom of something into something that’s an industry in itself. Why are we not applauding until our hands bleed? No, we mock her. We say, “Oh, it’s not very good.” Except she managed to write something that everybody wants to read. It’s “not very good”? By what standard is it not good if loads and loads of people love it? “Why don’t you f–k off!” It’s not for me, but I think she’s awfully clever.

Sherlock had record ratings in the US last season ,opening to 4 million viewers. The passion for this show is very strong among U.S. fans. Yet I’m surprised the ratings are not higher, even with piracy, given that so many of our hit shows are crime dramas that people don’t talk about nearly as much. That more people watch Elementary is kind of annoying.
Well, you bring us back to piracy don’t you? I don’t know what the real ratings for Sherlock in America are—or Doctor Who. There are an awful lot of people watching it by means they’re not happy to put their hands up about. Which, again, is the vendor’s fault. It’s our fault. We don’t want to arrest them, we want to charge them money. I think an awful lot more people in this country have seen Sherlock than is ever admitted, as with Doctor Who. A long time ago—and Netflix muddied the water even further—we lost the ability to know how many people watch a TV show. We don’t really know. Benedict is one of the most famous people in the world, and he’s largely famous wearing the coat and the scarf. [Sherlock is] what he’s famous for. I’m not having a pop at Elementary, but Benedict is a lot more famous than anybody on their show. He can walk down fewer streets [without being mobbed] in America than the other guy.

Any guest stars lined up for series 4?
Not yet. But as Mark always says, it’s better to be a star-maker. We found all these people, Benedict, Scott, Lara Pulver. These people launched careers on the basis of doing the show. It’s tough because we got Benedict and Martin—they’re probably the two biggest British film stars. If you pay extra money to cast somebody famous, are they actually going to provide you with one single extra viewer?

It will have been a bit of wait, though.
[Fans] get very cross that we don’t make more. Had we made this as a conventional series it would be over. Because Benedict and Martin are never going to agree for the rest of their lives to do any series for runs of six or 12. They don’t need the money and they want a bigger variety of jobs. The only version of Sherlock you’re gonna get is this one. I think that’s a pretty good deal. Compare us to Guy Richie’s Sherlock Holmes: We’ve made 10, he’s made two. Or how often you get a James Bond film. You’ll get a longer-lasting, richer experience the way we’re making it.

to everyone who can’t understand why we are sad

imagine that you have a favourite tv-show which tells a story of 5 friend, how they meet, how they bacome friends, how they become a family. you get to know their inside jokes, relationships between each of them, their personalities, ups and dows of their journey together. that tv-show is the one thing that makes you happy, it’s the light of your life. you laugh with them, you cry with them, you can’t get enough of them. you feel like you’re their friend, part of them, even though in reality you don’t know them but you’ve gotten so close to them and you know each of them so well it feels like you are there with them. suddenly, one of them leaves the show and lefts other 4 alone. you’d be sad, wouldn’t you?
this is what is happening to us right now, but in real life

Q. Have you and the other principals on the show stayed in touch over the years?
A. Yeah I live next to Chris when I’m out here. We’re neighbors. Gillian and I have an email relationship. I maybe see her once or twice a year. Maybe if we do a convention — well, I’ve done one.
Q. When was that?
A. About a year and half ago in New York.
Q. Were you talking about a new version even back then?
A. We always talk about it. It’s always like, yeah let’s do that. But then everybody has their own things that they’re doing and it’s so hard to get everybody in the same place at the same time. We managed to that this time around, just barely.

David Duchovny, New York Times, March 27, 2015

Sherlock season 4: 'Frightening, tough, emotional upheaval'

BY JAMES HIBBERD

Interviewing ultra-secretive Steven Moffat about Sherlock is a tricky endeavor, given that the writer-producer would prefer to say nothing at all about what will happen in the show’s hugely anticipated fourth season. But during our wide-ranging recent interview, the Sherlock co-creator gave us a few hints about what to expect when the BBC/PBS Masterpiece fan-favorite series returns. Plus, he addressed the long wait between seasons, took a little dig at that other Holmes show—CBS drama Elementary—and even gave a suprirsingly passionate defense of Fifty Shades of Grey.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So, what do you feel comfortable telling us about season 4—or “series” 4, as it’s called in the U.K.?
STEVEN MOFFAT: There are answers coming to questions which nobody has asked. There’s one thing that no one has really brought up…

Can you say what the question is?
No. We’ve actually set up something, I think—[co-creator Mark Gatiss] and me, we’re very exultant about a little thing we’ve set up that no one is talking about.

The episodes get so heavily analyzed it’s surprising that fans have overlooked something.
It’s not that we’re being clever. We never know. Sometimes people go mad for one thing we think is quiet trivial and completely ignore something we think is standing right in front of you.

What distinguishes season 4 from previous years?
We haven’t started writing it yet, so it’s early. The first series was all about the beginning of their friendship. Second about the formative stages, the love and fear and loss and all that. The third was good days, me and my pal and my pal’s wife. Those are golden days. The missing element in a lot of Sherlock Holmes adaptations is allowing it to be funny. There’s a lot of humor in Sherlock Holmes, and it’s ignored in a lot of adaptations. [Season 4] is going to be… I suppose you’d say… consequences. It’s consequences. Chickens come to roost. It’s dark in some ways—obviously it’s great fun and a Sherlock Holmes romp and all that—but there’s a sense of… things… coming back to bite you. It’s not a safe, sensible way to live. It’s hilarious and exhilarating some days, but some days it’s going to be bloody frightening.

Is it more serialized than previous seasons?  
Probably. A lot of serialization is latent, isn’t it? It’s hidden. Series 3 doesn’t look very serialized, but you look back at how much we’re setting up Mary [Amanda Abbington] to be who she turns out to be. It will be three stand-alone films, 90 minutes each, and an ongoing mystery, as there sort of always is.

How will fans feel after watching it?
Hmmm… desperate for series 5. We’re certainly going to put them through the mill. It’s going to be more of an emotional upheaval. Hopefully enjoyable and fun, all the things Sherlock must always be. It will be tough at times. Maybe that’s the word? A tougher series.

Intense?
Intense is probably right. You can sort of see that in the way series 3 went. It’s great that he’s back and John’s [Martin Freeman] got a wife and Sherlock [Benedict Cumberbatch] likes her and isn’t it adorable, and then it all goes to hell. Remember where we left them.

Season three was known for having some bold tonal shifts. There was the meta-fun of “The Empty Herse,” the rom-com of “The Sign of Three,” the thriller of “His Last Vow.” In season 2, “The Hounds of Baskerville” was a bit of a horror story. I’m wondering if you’re doing the Sherlock version of other genres in series 4?
To a degree, you always do, yes. We’re trying to [be] as varied in tone as the stories are. Everybody tends to think of the Hollywood version of Sherlock Holmes. The films tend to be like Hound of the Baskervilles, with horror and crime. You go to the stories and Moriarty is only in one of them. Quite often, Sherlock is investigating small domestic crimes, and quite often there’s no crime at all, and there’s a lot of humor. So “The Sign of Three” you might think is a huge departure for Sherlock Holmes if you don’t know Sherlock Holmes very well. But it’s not. The mysteries he solves, and the level of humor and the interaction with Sherlock and Watson is sort of right.

Last season in particular, I felt like you were almost trying to break Benedict Cumberbatch by giving him tougher and tougher challenges, acting-wise, and then watching him pull it off. Have you found new ways to stretch and challenge Holmes for series 4, and is that something you consciously think about?
The reason we still have Benedict and Martin is we still give them acting challenges. Otherwise they wouldn’t come and play with us. They don’t need the money. What we give them in terms of money isn’t something they’d regard as a significant fee anymore. We’re making this in a shed in Wales. We think really carefully about giving them something to play because they’re both amazing actors. Normally if you watch a show, [the characters] tend to narrow as the people who make the show tend to know what works. When I was doing series 3, I went and looked at Martin and Benedict’s other performances to remind myself of what else they do. I watched the British The Office again.

So good.
So unbelievably good. I hadn’t quite realized the extent he plays the lead in that. It reminds you that he’s got all that too. I can bring in other colors to it.

This might be a trickier question than I’m intending it to be: Given the popularity of Andrew Scott’s character, have you ever regretted “killing” off Moriarty?
We knew we had to be bold about that. We knew what we wanted to do. Moriarty is only in one story, “The Final Problem,” and has a flashback appearance in another. The story of Sherlock Holmes isn’t Sherlock vs. a criminal mastermind. It just isn’t. So we wanted to have a huge story for “The Final Problem,” but kill him… we knew what we wanted the consequences of that moment to be. Andrew became a star overnight. He became a star based on the smallest amount of screen time ever—he’s not actually in it that much. He’s hardly in the first series at all. Even “The Reichenbach Fall,” when I was doing a pass on [the script], I added a couple scenes because he’s got to show up more. He’s always asking, “Do I get a flashback? Am I going to show up again?”

Last year the distribution window between Britain and U.S. premiere of Sherlock was shortened, but there was still a bit of a gap. Recently HBO announced that Game of Thrones will premiere simultaneously in 130 countries. You would think Sherlock could premiere simultaneously in two countries, right?
I really, really do think it should. I think it’s absolute bloody nonsense. The audience is not prepared to wait. [Somebody] recently said, “If I want something and it’s not available, I think it’s the vendor’s fault.” With Doctor Who we pretty much have that—certainly with Britain and America, it comes out the same day. Doing that ended an awful lot of the piracy. Yes, it should be. But that’s a question for PBS and Masterpiece.

You mentioned your budget. I wondered whether, given how the show is this international sensation, the new season has a bigger budget.
The reality is no. I’m fighting tooth and nail on both shows to get enough money to make them. It’s hugely frustrating and annoying at times because they couldn’t be more successful.

Last I checked, you were swayed that a Sherlock and Doctor Who crossover is not a good idea and won’t happen. Any movement on that?
My instinct—and this is probably from years of doing Doctor Who—is I’m just such a tart. If people want to, we should give it to them. But I got persuaded by Mark, Benedict, [executive producer Sue Vertue] and Martin saying, “Look, it will never be as good as they think it’s going to be,” and then I say, “Yes, but we’ll just bang it out and make it as good.” “Yeah, but you can’t give everybody everything they want all the time.” I’m in the camp of giving them everything they want. But I think they’re sane and right and I’m just a tart.

What’s the best or funniest piece of Sherlock fan fiction or fan art you’ve seen?
I don’t know the funniest. There’s been some eye-watering stuff of Benedict and Martin together. A load of it has been superb. There’s a tendency to disparage it. I don’t agree. Even the slash fiction, that’s a great way to learn to work. No one really does three-act structure, but just trying to put words that make somebody else turned on, that’s going to teach you more about writing than any writing college you can go to. It’s creative and exciting. I refuse to mock it—because I’m a man who writes Sherlock Holmes fan fiction for a living!

It’s how we ended up with Fifty Shades of Grey, after all.
People want to be mocking of that. But bloody hell, that’s amazing—that [EL James] turned her fandom of something into something that’s an industry in itself. Why are we not applauding until our hands bleed? No, we mock her. We say, “Oh, it’s not very good.” Except she managed to write something that everybody wants to read. It’s “not very good”? By what standard is it not good if loads and loads of people love it? “Why don’t you f–k off!” It’s not for me, but I think she’s awfully clever.

Sherlock had record ratings in the US last season ,opening to 4 million viewers. The passion for this show is very strong among U.S. fans. Yet I’m surprised the ratings are not higher, even with piracy, given that so many of our hit shows are crime dramas that people don’t talk about nearly as much. That more people watch Elementary is kind of annoying.
Well, you bring us back to piracy don’t you? I don’t know what the real ratings for Sherlock in America are—or Doctor Who. There are an awful lot of people watching it by means they’re not happy to put their hands up about. Which, again, is the vendor’s fault. It’s our fault. We don’t want to arrest them, we want to charge them money. I think an awful lot more people in this country have seen Sherlock than is ever admitted, as with Doctor Who. A long time ago—and Netflix muddied the water even further—we lost the ability to know how many people watch a TV show. We don’t really know. Benedict is one of the most famous people in the world, and he’s largely famous wearing the coat and the scarf. [Sherlock is] what he’s famous for. I’m not having a pop at Elementary, but Benedict is a lot more famous than anybody on their show. He can walk down fewer streets [without being mobbed] in America than the other guy.

Any guest stars lined up for series 4?
Not yet. But as Mark always says, it’s better to be a star-maker. We found all these people, Benedict, Scott, Lara Pulver. These people launched careers on the basis of doing the show. It’s tough because we got Benedict and Martin—they’re probably the two biggest British film stars. If you pay extra money to cast somebody famous, are they actually going to provide you with one single extra viewer?

It will have been a bit of wait, though.
[Fans] get very cross that we don’t make more. Had we made this as a conventional series it would be over. Because Benedict and Martin are never going to agree for the rest of their lives to do any series for runs of six or 12. They don’t need the money and they want a bigger variety of jobs. The only version of Sherlock you’re gonna get is this one. I think that’s a pretty good deal. Compare us to Guy Richie’s Sherlock Holmes: We’ve made 10, he’s made two. Or how often you get a James Bond film. You’ll get a longer-lasting, richer experience the way we’re making it.

x

Sherlock season 4: ‘Frightening, tough, emotional upheaval’

Interviewing ultra-secretive Steven Moffat about Sherlock is a tricky endeavor, given that the writer-producer would prefer to say nothing at all about what will happen in the show’s hugely anticipated fourth season. But during our wide-ranging recent interview, the Sherlock co-creator gave us a few hints about what to expect when the BBC/PBS Masterpiece fan-favorite series returns. Plus, he addressed the long wait between seasons, took a little dig at that other Holmes show—CBS drama Elementary—and even gave a suprirsingly passionate defense of Fifty Shades of Grey

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: So, what do you feel comfortable telling us about season 4—or “series” 4, as it’s called in the U.K.?
STEVEN MOFFAT: There are answers coming to questions which nobody has asked. There’s one thing that no one has really brought up…

Can you say what the question is? 
No. We’ve actually set up something, I think—[co-creator Mark Gatiss] and me, we’re very exultant about a little thing we’ve set up that no one is talking about. 

The episodes get so heavily analyzed it’s surprising that fans have overlooked something.
It’s not that we’re being clever. We never know. Sometimes people go mad for one thing we think is quiet trivial and completely ignore something we think is standing right in front of you.

What distinguishes season 4 from previous years?
We haven’t started writing it yet, so it’s early. The first series was all about the beginning of their friendship. Second about the formative stages, the love and fear and loss and all that. The third was good days, me and my pal and my pal’s wife. Those are golden days. The missing element in a lot of Sherlock Holmes adaptations is allowing it to be funny. There’s a lot of humor in Sherlock Holmes, and it’s ignored in a lot of adaptations. [Season 4] is going to be… I suppose you’d say… consequences. It’s consequences. Chickens come to roost. It’s dark in some ways—obviously it’s great fun and a Sherlock Holmes romp and all that—but there’s a sense of… things… coming back to bite you. It’s not a safe, sensible way to live. It’s hilarious and exhilarating some days, but some days it’s going to be bloody frightening.

Is it more serialized than previous seasons?  
Probably. A lot of serialization is latent, isn’t it? It’s hidden. Series 3 doesn’t look very serialized, but you look back at how much we’re setting up Mary [Amanda Abbington] to be who she turns out to be. It will be three stand-alone films, 90 minutes each, and an ongoing mystery, as there sort of always is.

How will fans feel after watching it?
Hmmm… desperate for series 5. We’re certainly going to put them through the mill. It’s going to be more of an emotional upheaval. Hopefully enjoyable and fun, all the things Sherlock must always be. It will be tough at times. Maybe that’s the word? A tougher series.

Intense?
Intense is probably right. You can sort of see that in the way series 3 went. It’s great that he’s back and John’s [Martin Freeman] got a wife and Sherlock [Benedict Cumberbatch] likes her and isn’t it adorable, and then it all goes to hell. Remember where we left them.

Season three was known for having some bold tonal shifts. There was the meta-fun of “The Empty Herse,” the rom-com of “The Sign of Three,” the thriller of “His Last Vow.” In season 2, “The Hounds of Baskerville” was a bit of a horror story. I’m wondering if you’re doing the Sherlock version of other genres in series 4?
To a degree, you always do, yes. We’re trying to [be] as varied in tone as the stories are. Everybody tends to think of the Hollywood version of Sherlock Holmes. The films tend to be like Hound of the Baskervilles, with horror and crime. You go to the stories and Moriarty is only in one of them. Quite often, Sherlock is investigating small domestic crimes, and quite often there’s no crime at all, and there’s a lot of humor. So “The Sign of Three” you might think is a huge departure for Sherlock Holmes if you don’t know Sherlock Holmes very well. But it’s not. The mysteries he solves, and the level of humor and the interaction with Sherlock and Watson is sort of right.

Last season in particular, I felt like you were almost trying to break Benedict Cumberbatch by giving him tougher and tougher challenges, acting-wise, and then watching him pull it off. Have you found new ways to stretch and challenge Holmes for series 4, and is that something you consciously think about?
The reason we still have Benedict and Martin is we still give them acting challenges. Otherwise they wouldn’t come and play with us. They don’t need the money. What we give them in terms of money isn’t something they’d regard as a significant fee anymore. We’re making this in a shed in Wales. We think really carefully about giving them something to play because they’re both amazing actors. Normally if you watch a show, [the characters] tend to narrow as the people who make the show tend to know what works. When I was doing series 3, I went and looked at Martin and Benedict’s other performances to remind myself of what else they do. I watched the British The Office again.

So good.
So unbelievably good. I hadn’t quite realized the extent he plays the lead in that. It reminds you that he’s got all that too. I can bring in other colors to it.

This might be a trickier question than I’m intending it to be: Given the popularity of Andrew Scott’s character, have you ever regretted “killing” off Moriarty? 
We knew we had to be bold about that. We knew what we wanted to do. Moriarty is only in one story, “The Final Problem,” and has a flashback appearance in another. The story of Sherlock Holmes isn’t Sherlock vs. a criminal mastermind. It just isn’t. So we wanted to have a huge story for “The Final Problem,” but kill him… we knew what we wanted the consequences of that moment to be. Andrew became a star overnight. He became a star based on the smallest amount of screen time ever—he’s not actually in it that much. He’s hardly in the first series at all. Even “The Reichenbach Fall,” when I was doing a pass on [the script], I added a couple scenes because he’s got to show up more. He’s always asking, “Do I get a flashback? Am I going to show up again?”

Last year the distribution window between Britain and U.S. premiere of Sherlock was shortened, but there was still a bit of a gap. Recently HBO announced that Game of Thrones will premiere simultaneously in 130 countries. You would think Sherlock could premiere simultaneously in two countries, right?
I really, really do think it should. I think it’s absolute bloody nonsense. The audience is not prepared to wait. [Somebody] recently said, “If I want something and it’s not available, I think it’s the vendor’s fault.” With Doctor Who we pretty much have that—certainly with Britain and America, it comes out the same day. Doing that ended an awful lot of the piracy. Yes, it should be. But that’s a question for PBS and Masterpiece.

You mentioned your budget. I wondered whether, given how the show is this international sensation, the new season has a bigger budget.
The reality is no. I’m fighting tooth and nail on both shows to get enough money to make them. It’s hugely frustrating and annoying at times because they couldn’t be more successful.

Last I checked, you were swayed that a Sherlock and Doctor Who crossover is not a good idea and won’t happen. Any movement on that?
My instinct—and this is probably from years of doing Doctor Who—is I’m just such a tart. If people want to, we should give it to them. But I got persuaded by Mark, Benedict, [executive producer Sue Vertue] and Martin saying, “Look, it will never be as good as they think it’s going to be,” and then I say, “Yes, but we’ll just bang it out and make it as good.” “Yeah, but you can’t give everybody everything they want all the time.” I’m in the camp of giving them everything they want. But I think they’re sane and right and I’m just a tart.

What’s the best or funniest piece of Sherlock fan fiction or fan art you’ve seen?
I don’t know the funniest. There’s been some eye-watering stuff of Benedict and Martin together. A load of it has been superb. There’s a tendency to disparage it. I don’t agree. Even the slash fiction, that’s a great way to learn to work. No one really does three-act structure, but just trying to put words that make somebody else turned on, that’s going to teach you more about writing than any writing college you can go to. It’s creative and exciting. I refuse to mock it—because I’m a man who writes Sherlock Holmes fan fiction for a living!

It’s how we ended up with Fifty Shades of Grey, after all.
People want to be mocking of that. But bloody hell, that’s amazing—that [EL James] turned her fandom of something into something that’s an industry in itself. Why are we not applauding until our hands bleed? No, we mock her. We say, “Oh, it’s not very good.” Except she managed to write something that everybody wants to read. It’s “not very good”? By what standard is it not good if loads and loads of people love it? “Why don’t you f–k off!” It’s not for me, but I think she’s awfully clever.

Sherlock had record ratings in the US last season ,opening to 4 million viewers. The passion for this show is very strong among U.S. fans. Yet I’m surprised the ratings are not higher, even with piracy, given that so many of our hit shows are crime dramas that people don’t talk about nearly as much. That more people watch Elementary is kind of annoying.
Well, you bring us back to piracy don’t you? I don’t know what the real ratings for Sherlock in America are—or Doctor Who. There are an awful lot of people watching it by means they’re not happy to put their hands up about. Which, again, is the vendor’s fault. It’s our fault. We don’t want to arrest them, we want to charge them money. I think an awful lot more people in this country have seen Sherlock than is ever admitted, as with Doctor Who. A long time ago—and Netflix muddied the water even further—we lost the ability to know how many people watch a TV show. We don’t really know. Benedict is one of the most famous people in the world, and he’s largely famous wearing the coat and the scarf. [Sherlock is] what he’s famous for. I’m not having a pop at Elementary, but Benedict is a lot more famous than anybody on their show. He can walk down fewer streets [without being mobbed] in America than the other guy.

Any guest stars lined up for series 4?
Not yet. But as Mark always says, it’s better to be a star-maker. We found all these people, Benedict, Scott, Lara Pulver. These people launched careers on the basis of doing the show. It’s tough because we got Benedict and Martin—they’re probably the two biggest British film stars. If you pay extra money to cast somebody famous, are they actually going to provide you with one single extra viewer?

It will have been a bit of wait, though. 
[Fans] get very cross that we don’t make more. Had we made this as a conventional series it would be over. Because Benedict and Martin are never going to agree for the rest of their lives to do any series for runs of six or 12. They don’t need the money and they want a bigger variety of jobs. The only version of Sherlock you’re gonna get is this one. I think that’s a pretty good deal. Compare us to Guy Richie’s Sherlock Holmes: We’ve made 10, he’s made two. Or how often you get a James Bond film. You’ll get a longer-lasting, richer experience the way we’re making it.

27.3.2015 (x)

What is the one thing that no one has brought up yet?! I just can’t think what it could be. I need to know! Moffffffffffattttttt! *shakes fist*

it kinda sucks because after years and years I’m finally getting comfortable with my body and really appreciating and valuing all my progress and hard work I’ve had over the past few years and am starting to actually wear clothes that show things off instead of covering myself up and hiding in clothes all the time and I even tried on a bathing suit the other day and thought I looked hella cute and I haven’t worn a bikini and thought I looked cute since like freshman year of high school but LOL that’s all going to go out the window the second I land in Korea yay……

miscellaneous au’s
  • ♡ person a is a dance instructor and person b can’t dance for shit but their best friend is getting married and insists that the whole wedding party must learn a giant and highly embarassing group dance as well as basic dance styles. person a takes person b on as their personal project.
  • ♡ person a runs the only ‘50′s style diner in town until person b shows up and opens their own ‘20′s style diner just down the street with, and loath person a is to admit it, better coffee and even better decorations. battle of the oldie diners ensues as they try to one up each other.
  • ♡ person a works for the local police department with the K-9 unit and person b works are a parademic. both admire the other from afar and all their colleagues remark on how well they pull together as a team under high stress situations. person a gets extremely hurt in one situation and admits to person b their feelings just before they pass out.
  • ♡ person a and person b were childhood enemies and fought to one up the other in literally everything they did (dodgeball was deadly). turns out that they both went into training to join the local police force and both become new members. needless to say the competitiveness still takes hold. 
  • ♡ person a owns a karaoke bar and person b comes in almost everynight with their group of friends to drunkenly sing david bowie songs. one night person b manages to get person a to sing a song with them and person a kisses them afterwards.
  • ♡ person a works as a dj for a strip club, person b is the new dancer.
  • ♡ person a is a fashion designer and person b is the newest model to the scene that’s taking over by storm and will be joining person a’s team of models.
  • ♡ person a works at an old diner that is really popular with the local biker gang and they totally have a thing for person b, who is in said biker gang. bonus: person a has to manouver around on rollerblades and constantly falls in front of person b but person b finds it entirely too endearing.
  • ♡ high school au: person a is the nerdy music kid who can play piano and guitar and person b is the dancer kid whom person a has had a crush on since kindergarten. person a writes a song for person b and person a’s friends make sure person b is there to hear it.
  • ♡ person a works as a nature photographer and person b is the local expert on all the hiking trails and other beautiful spots of the small town that person a has stumbled upon. they fall in love while hiking around and person a takes just as many pictures of person b as they do of the nature.

Look, it’s because of bootlegs that we have recordings of Richard Burton in Camelot, Elaine Stritch in Company, the original production of Follies, and a host of other historically important shows and artists, so no matter your arguments against it, I’m always gonna value them at least for what they do for historical preservation.

Yes, bootlegs do not provide an accurate depiction of what the actual theatrical experience is like (though if we want to go down that route, cast albums and pro-shots kinda really don’t either), and yes, you really wouldn’t want a person’s experience with a show to be a somewhat crappy unprofessional recording. But if 50 years from now that’s the only record of that production available? Fuck, I’ll take it any day.

Theatre is important. Even in all its ephemeral glory, it should be preserved. And even as they’re a deeply flawed and imperfect solution to that problem, bootlegs are still a solution.

Possible changes are coming...

When I created this Tumblr page, my intentions were to share my love of underwear with others, either by taking pictures of me in my underwear highlighting my favorite ones from my current collection or by sharing my underwear experiences from the perspective of a straight guy. I had hoped that I would inspire other straight guys to come forward and profess their love for underwear as well. In a world primarily inhabited by gay/bi men, it’s a daunting task, even scary at times, for a straight guy to show their love of underwear publicly. I’m happy to report I’ve had a handful of straight guys come forward. A couple of them even posted pictures on their own pages of themselves poising in their undies. I also motivated a few gay & bi men do the same. I’m ecstatic I was able to inspire anyone, straight/gay/bi, etc to post pictures of themselves in their favorite undies and share them with the world. It’s a liberating experience for them and I’m happy that a few took the scary jump with me.

However, in the past 45 days that I’ve been posting, I lost the integrity of my own page. I allowed myself to turn it into something that wasn’t a part of my original mission. I want this page to be about my love and the love my followers have for underwear by posting pictures and sharing experiences.

There’s another straight guy on Tumblr whose page I follow. His page is great because he solely posts pictures of himself in his underwear and gives a background story with each pair. He gave me an eye opening experience through a conversation we had yesterday. He had proactively reached out to me because he saw that my wife didn’t know about my Tumblr page. He confessed that he too went down that road when he started a few years back and wanted me to know he had concerns because his own personal experience didn’t end well and caused distrust in his marriage. He was reading my mind because truth be told, I haven’t felt myself for the past week. I thought it was stress from work, but after my conversation with this follower, it was apparent that the source of my anxiety was that I was keeping a secret from my wife, my best friend.

With all of this said, I’m making changes. I’ve received an unusual amount of anonymous messages this week. At least 15 a day just from anonymous people, which is way more than I ever have. Here’s the deal. I’m a people pleaser. I’ll do anything to keep people happy, even if it means undue stress or anxiety to me or possibly losing the integrity of something I’m trying to accomplish on my Tumblr page. I need to stop that. As you know, when you respond to a message from an anonymous person, it posts your response publicly. There were a couple anonymous messages that I responded to that I shouldn’t have, but I only did because of my desire to keep people happy and interested. I’ve since deleted those posts. Also, there were a lot of anonymous messages that I didn’t respond to because the comments/questions/propositions were enough to even make the devil blush! However, I also want to make it known that many of the other anonymous messages I received were completely harmless, I just decided not to reply.

I enjoy getting all types messages from both my followers and anonymous followers. I want to make that very clear. One of my favorite things is receiving messages from followers. However, I want you to also know that going forward if I feel the message isn’t geared towards underwear, it’s not getting posted publicly. So that means if anyone sends me an anonymous message that I feel doesn’t uphold the integrity and mission of my page, I’m not responding to it because I don’t want it posted publicly, not because I didn’t enjoy getting a message from you. Conversely, if you send a message that’s not an anonymous message and I still feel that it doesn’t fit the mission of my page, I will definitely respond to you, just not publicly. I think my followers know by now that I enjoy getting messages from them!

Lastly, I’m seriously contemplating closing down shop regardless. The other straight guy that I mentioned tried really hard to convince me otherwise and had some really great advice and convincing arguments as to why I should continue posting, but at the end of the day, I’ve had anxiety about my page. Partly due to the fact I was publicly responding to things I shouldn’t have and partly due to the fact that I have one secret from my wife. I want to come forward to my wife and tell her about this page and why I’m doing it, but first I need to see if I can regain my integrity and get this page back on track with its mission.

I’m not sure when I’ll be ready to have the conversation with my wife, but it will be soon. If she’s at all uncomfortable about it, I’ll be deactivating my page immediately because she’s my everything. So if you log on one day and see that I’m gone, you’ll know why!! Haha. But if she’s open to it, I can only hope I can continue with my mission and create a page that can be enjoyed by all my undies fools!!

Thank you for your understanding and for reading this exceptionally long post!

Another fic trope I wish had a specific, unifying tag on AO3 so that I could find them all in one place: 

Person hooks up with celebrity they don’t recognize. Better yet, two celebrities who don’t recognize each other hook up. Then one person’s best friend catches them looking all well laid the next morning and is just like “You did not just. How the. DO YOU EVEN KNOW WHO THAT IS.”

I don’t even care whether it’s a celebrity AU of some genre tv show I don’t watch or RPF or some fourth wall breaking genre-fandom/RPF crossover this trope is my jam I need all the fic.

jstar1382 asked:

I'm going to ask you the same question you asked me because I'm such a fan of your writing. What's your favorite story you've written and why?

Thanks for the question! Sorry this is way late; work has been nuts.

Had to grin because I too have answered this question just the other day (here’s the extensive reply: http://nic6879.tumblr.com/post/113969908677/in-case-you-need-more-distracting-what-are-your)

Ultimately I think “kairos” might be it. I’ve worked hard on this one, spent a lot of time both writing and editing even though the chapters are fairly short but that was on purpose - I had a really particular mood and atmosphere in mind that I wanted to capture when I wrote it, a sense of quiet and piece I guess, and I was aiming to say it with comparatively few words and still accomplish setting that mood, showing the emotional intensity of each moment, and while the writing isn’t perfect by a long shot, I do think that I was able to have the story *feel* like I’d wanted it to feel, to translate that calmness and inevitability, that sense of ‘rightness’ of their relationship.

Thank you for the kind words - it truly means a lot to me to you you’re enjoying my pieces! 😊

right. i get how it’s rude and ableist to use words like ‘stupid’ ‘idiot’ and ‘moron’ to insult others. to try and speak down to people from this imaginary almighty pillar of mental perfection. to use slurs associated with the atypical and ill, as though being either one was inherently subhuman. that’s terrible, no question.

but like… to take literature, movies, television shows, conversations and so on that use these rather common terms (stupid/dumb/idiot), and then to deem those things ~irredeemable trash~ or a toxic blight to a neurodiverse modern society… it doesn’t make sense to me. when you emotionally overreact to things, you don’t help anyone or anything. and most of us, even much of the neuroatypical sum of us, can learn to regulate or control our emotions when preparing to discuss accepted social customs that are actually quite harmful to our community.

this is the sort of thing that feels very much like trying to explore the world in a suit of pillow armor. and demanding a road of pillows be laid down for you to trod upon.

like the campaign to educate society about the harm these words cause is very important, but screeching at every use of them and condemning anything related to the utterance is not helpful for you, it’s not helpful for the movement, and it’s especially not helpful to suggest to others that they should be reacting similarly

because the world isn’t made of pillows and tea and play-doh

and you can’t challenge problematic customs, let alone help yourself and others affected by them, just by screaming