and now i have carpal tunnel syndrome

anonymous asked:

OMG Bob and the other guy are died 50 50 for the Alpha Male contest currently!!! vote everybody!

Originally posted by bellarke

Listen you people, you lovely bob stans. We’re depending on you.

Let me tell you a little bit about the older demographic that is The Sam Stans. 

I’m old, okay? Much older than the rest of The 100 fandom. Older folks? We have flaws. We’re tired. It gets to be too much for us. We’ve got kids and jobs and early bedtimes. And things like carpal tunnel syndrome and our nightly booze habit.

We do not have the stamina of the lovely, young The 100 fanbase.  Now I’m a super big Bob Morley and The 100 fan, but we also know I’m one of the oldest in the fandom. And I am working my ass off trying to vote. I HATE POLLS. So I’m not a power voter. I don’t have the time or energy. I’ve got kids bugging me and work to do (shit I’m supposed to be working now!) 

This is how we win. 

Use your young passion and stamina and do NOT give up. Be relentless. Drink those redbully energy drinks you kids like nowadays. We catch up overnight while the Sam stans are getting their beauty sleep and preparing for their work day. But when they wake up, they fight back. They’re passionate. But they’re also busy and tired and distracted!!!

Especially on that last day. The voting does NOT end overnight where we get our edge, so we’ll have to be FIERCE AND RELENTLESS LIKE MILENNIALS!!! YOU CANNOT BE STOPPED, KIDS! VOTE VOTE VOTE SOME MORE. 

If I’m this tired and still voting hundreds of times a day, y’all can definitely do better than me. I’m losing it. They’re old like me. Maybe they’ll lose it, too. You are young and vigorous and you love Bob.

Sam stans have won before but they have never had Bob Morley fans to deal with. Listen, we’ve been dealing with the antis all this time. Actual real fans? Just as obsessed as we are. We can do it. 

VOTE, MY LOVELIES, VOTE LIKE THE WIND

Please, read

For a time, I couldn’t draw anything. Why? Because, yesterday, I couldn’t move my hand. It hurt me a lot because, in addition to drawing, I’m working in all the works of my university. I’ll finish in five weeks and I still have to deliver nine (or, ten, I don’t remember) projects and I have to do 4 (or 6 tests, it depends of my mark).

For all that work, yesterday I had the hand immobile and people scared me because they said me that I can suffer the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome AND I DON’T WANT THAT. Today I can move it, but, it still hurts so… I’m sorry, but I can’t draw by now. Then, I’m a DEFINITIVE HIATUS (temporarily).

My hands starting to hurt a little now and I’m trying to power through but I’m scared I might be developing carpal tunnel syndrome so I guess I shouldn’t draw so I don’t make it worse (and I have no ideas or motivation anyway) but when I’m not drawing I feel useless :(

     “Oh, my God, look at me! I look like a scarecrow!”
     “You look great.”
     “No, I don’t. I’ve been out here for hours and I’m 74 and a half, so take your pick.”
     “You look nice.”
     “I look like a hen. My hair doesn’t do very well outside. I don’t care. You’ll never get another chance. I’m not going to be around much longer. My mother died when she was 74—it’s amazing how history repeats itself.”
     “Tell me more about yourself.”
     “You could probably write 10 books about my life. I wrote a book and lost it on the computer.
     I was born on a farm 30 miles north of Dublin, Ireland, and I never had a house until this one. I was born on Christmas Day, the day before my husband was born. I came over here in 1965, and I suffered from major depression for most of my marriage. My husband was abusive physically, emotionally, and financially. I could’ve lived with him until I was 74—or even 174—and he only got worse. He hit me, spat on me and called me ‘scum.’ He used one credit card after another and didn’t pay the bills. Our gas was cut off, then the electricity, and then we were threatened with foreclosures. He made four kids—the first three within a year of each other—and one day he threw me out. Then he brainwashed the kids, and now he lives in Ireland and everyone treats him like a king.
     I worked at Mass General for 31 years. They didn’t want to let me go because I was fantastic at typing, but now I have two kinds of arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. I started typing at school in 1954—how long is that, 50 or 60 years?
     I retired at 69 and a half, and I’ve been working like a dog ever since. I’m a maniac—an obsessive compulsive—and that’s what keeps me going.”
     “Why didn’t you try to get out of your marriage?”
     “I don’t know. I’m just so patient, and then I began to wonder, Why did I waste so much time? I was too conscientious, too devoted. I didn’t want my kids to suffer, so I pretended everything was OK. I had no family here, no one to stand up for me. Back then, there wasn’t much support for women. There were no shelters or anything like this. I checked and I looked. Even the judge didn’t believe me; he believed him.
     More pictures? Look at my hair! My mother had the same kind of hair. I’m very much like her. I never had nice hair, but I am a good person. Wouldn’t you say I am a good person? But I don’t think my husband wanted to be married, as he wouldn’t have waited that long for me: He would’ve gotten someone else.  I wasn’t much to look at.”
     “Why do you keep saying this?”
     “Because it’s true. I had a lazy eye, lousy hair, and I was short. But I had a good heart and a good mind, and those things are important in my book.” 
     “Why did you marry him in the first place?”
     “I had no experience. We weren’t allowed to go out until we were 18, and then it would be once a week—chaperoned. How can you find a husband? We didn’t know beans about finding a husband. It was even worse for the men. They wouldn’t be allowed to marry until their parents were nearly dead. There were so many spinsters, and the parents were so possessive: ‘You stay home and take care of us.’ I stayed home until I was 25 and then I said, ‘If I stay any longer, I will be on the shelf.’ So I got out and I didn’t want to go back home with my tail between my legs, so I got married. But I still don’t know why I married him. It was probably because he was the first one to smile at me.”

5

I haven’t been on tumblr too much over the last few days. It’s been getting me more anxious for tomorrow’s episode than comforting. 😆

But with all the new interviews, tweets and “clues” found, I’m pretty sure I’m leaning toward Denial Isle right now.

Just thought that I’d give an update about the spoon riot spoons for Beth. At this point, I honestly and earnestly feel that it’s a little moot point to have sent them but at the same time, what else was I going to do with all these spoons that already say “Beth Greene” anyway?

I counted the number of spoons. It’s around 1050. 😳 I’m surprised I don’t have carpal tunnel syndrome or a variant. I thought the number was funny. 1050. Haha. Like sorta maybe 510? Sorta. Sorry I’m being lame.

Anyway. Thank you fellow Bethylers/Beth fans for support and thank you partner-in-crime arniearns16!

Just 24 more hours~ I’m so excited & stressed. This is awesome. 😄

Alright…so the real reason I haven’t been drawing so much lately is because I have carpal tunnel syndrome.

 I kind of didn’t want to admit it in case I wanted to open commissions officially again but I have a ganglion cyst developing currently and I just can’t draw as often or as good as I used to because of it. 

I’m going to buy a small brace tomorrow and see if that helps any but for right now…I’m pretty stagnant in the art area because i can’t let my hand flow as freely as it used to.