and not just in general terms of these elements

anonymous asked:

In my opinion, white has the narrowest color as far as thematics. It's basically the color of all things non magic. I understand the philosophy, but the actual "magic" hardly ever expands past "light" or "religion". Even the planeswalkers are mostly just military officers.

It’s the color with the fewest nature themes in its repertoire, which is something I mentioned in my article about the elements the colors use. Much of its magic revolves around civilization, from technology to social cues.

Of course, this is just in general terms. Each block works more unique things into each color. For example, White was the main color of sand magic in the Tarkir block.

Worldbuilding Manga List

microlm​ asked me for manga like Kubera with good worldbuilding. As expected, I decided to make another rec list. (I also have a LGBTQI+ manga rec list flopping around in my drafts which I will clean up, um, later.)

But, yeah, here. First rec list that isn’t done while procrastinating, whoo!

Keep reading

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30 Days of Blogging: Day 9

I have reached the end of the week and, miraculously, am still alive!! Albeit absolutely exhausted: have discovered 5 exams in four days really takes it out of you…..

I am officially over half way through now, only 5 left after half term and I’m freeeee. Chemistry went well (I think) and just have to hope silly mistakes were kept to a minimum. My second general studies exam was also infinitely better than the first! Think I had a far better idea of what to expect today, plus it was the ‘science’ paper rather than the ‘culture’ paper so I was in my element. The questions were

1. Explain how scientific methods are used to investigate the effectiveness of medicals treatments

and 2. Discuss whether or not the NHS should provide alternative treatments (e.g acupuncture) that are not supported by scientific evidence.

Ended up writing about five pages in total: firstly on the use of animal testing, computer modelling, controlled drug/treatment tests (phase 1, phase 2 and phase 3), meta-analysis and double blind trials (aka all of unit 2 biology this year) for Q1. For the second questions wrote about the need to prioritise the distribution of funds towards establishing treatments for disorders currently without cures (e.g cancer, MS, alzheimers etc) instead of investing in unsubstantiated treatments that may not be effective. However, did acknowledge that some forms of alternative treatment do have a scientific basis. Eastern cultures have been using plants and herbs to treat ailments for centuries and the active ingredients in plants provided the foundation for early medical treatments. Also mentioned that alternative medical treatments may reduce reliance on modern medication which could reduce problems associated with over-prescription and antibiotic resistance. LOVED IT <3 

Met up with Gelato afterwards for coffee, xbox, films and a lovely walk in the woods (although sadly my phone had died at this point so no pictures) and honestly feeling so much more relaxed now:3 Just so glad I’ve made it to half term! 

It’s pretty late about now so I’m heading to bed now me thinks. Might let myself have a bit of a lie in in the morning - we’ll see how I go!

See ya later xxxx

This is going to be a long one

I think one of the biggest problems today is people’s general inability to accept criticism of… Well, anything. As if any legitimate critique of a book, TV show, movie, and so on is a personal critique of the people who enjoy these things.
The thing is, art and science and society can’t grow unless problematic elements are brought to light. And yes, especially in terms of art, sometimes the more important issue is the reaction the masses have and not the artist’s original intention (I’m looking at you, Robin Thicke and your “this was just a fun song for my wife”).

At the same time, any complaint and criticism does not necessarily have to detract from the original message. As if one minor issue means we should boycott it, or that when a celebrity or politician says something meaningful, it’s a race to find one obscure quote that person made ten years ago that says the opposite and from then anything else they said should be dismissed.

Just for example, because I’ve seen it so much recently, yes, Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass” should ABSOLUTELY be called out for lines like “Boys like a little more beauty,” as if girls should only be happy with their bodies because guys will like it. But in a world of media that glorifies being skinny and pretty and consistently criticizes women for their looks, ONE OF THE FEW SONGS THAT CELEBRATES being otherwise should not be immediately discounted.

So, to summarize:

Critics, unless an issue or problem is indeed severe enough, NEGATIVE ISSUES DO NOT IMMEDIATELY TAKE AWAY FROM A POSITIVE MESSAGE. ACCEPT THIS AND MOVE ON.

Defenders, when a critique or problematic issue is brought to attention, IT ISN’T A PERSONAL AFFRONT AGAINST YOU. ACKNOWLEDGE THE ISSUE AND STILL ENJOY THE DAMN THING.

Artists of any kind, when people are telling you that you’ve offended them, YOU DON’T GET TO INVALIDATE THOSE FEELINGS. YOU HAVE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE ISSUE AND BE BETTER

They’re quite right, you know; carbon dating doesn’t work on anything more than a few thousand years old. Fortunately we don’t just use carbon. There are many elements/isotopes that can be used to date things depending on what time scale you want to deal with. I believe the general term for the field is “radioisotope dating”, and it basically works by measuring the rate at which radioactive elements turn into other elements. Let’s say you have some element A with a half life of 250 years. You’d expect to find 100 grams of element A in a sample if it was brand new. If you find 50 grams, the sample must be about 250 years old. If you find 25 grams, it’s probably about 500 years old. And so on; after every so many years, the “half life”, the amount of the element that is left is approximately half its previous amount. All radioactive substances have these half-lives, and we know them to a pretty good precision. Obviously once you get very little of a substance (after about ~10 half lives, IIRC) it’s not very useful for dating materials, but as I said, there are a lot of them and their useful periods overlap, so we have a lot of ways to check our numbers. In the example above, if the sample also contains some element B with a half life of 500 years, and we’d expect to find 100 grams of it in a brand new sample, we should find 50 grams of element B when element A is down to 25 grams. Carbon dating, incidentally, can also be (and has been) verified using still other methods, like counting tree rings and geological evidence. In a nutshell, we know that carbon dating works because it’s been verified by other dating methods, like other radioisotopes. We know these other radioisotopes work because of a wealth of scientific evidence from nuclear physics. And there isn’t a shred of evidence to discount the validity of our current understanding of radioactive decay.