and michelle's performance

10

So, let us catch our killer.

5

“In an almost silent performance, Gladstone conveys a level of muted intensity wholly comparable to Liv Ullmann or early Hollywood icon Janet Gaynor. Her knack for carefully expressing a host of emotions through tiny details played across the face would make Julianne Moore proud. Gladstone possesses a strange majesty and remains in complete control of Jamie’s unruly feelings. Her eyes alight like magnetic fields as her voice slips with veiled excitement, signaling immense heartache through careful calibration. Her performance requires us to pay a great deal of attention to the detail and implication laid out across her expressive face, but the final result is a nothing less than a vigorously full-bodied creation.” — John Guerin

In Certain Women, Lily Gladstone gives one of the decade’s best performances. Here’s why.

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Women’s Art History Masterpost

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, feminist art scholar and research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, Anja Foerschner, selected key publications and journals for those want to explore art by women and feminist art.

The Feminist Art Journal (produced from 1972 to 1977).

The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community by Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James (1975).

Woman Artists 1550–1950 by Ann S. Harris (1977).

Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture. (Produced from 1977 to 1980).
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Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology by Arlene Raven, Cassandra Langer, and Joanna Ellen Frueh (1988).

Women, Art, and Power: And other Essays by Linda Nochlin (1988).

Women, Art, and Society by Whitney Chadwick (1990).

Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by Bell Hooks (1995).

Woven by the Grandmothers: Nineteenth-Century Navajo Textiles from the National Museum of the American Indian by Eulalie H. Bonar (1996).

Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History by Amelia Jones and Laura Cottingham (1996).

Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist by Judy Chicago (1997).

Angry Women by Andrea Juno and V. Vale (1999).

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History by Harmony Hammond (2000).

Black Feminist Cultural Criticism by Jacqueline Bobo (2001).

The Black Female Body: A Photographic History by Deborah Willis and Carla Williams (2002).

Art/Women/California, 1950–2000: Parallels and Intersections by Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni (2002).

Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace (2004).

Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York by Midori Yoshimoto (2005).

WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution by Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark (2007).

The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America by Charmaine A. Nelson (2007).

Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities by Laura E. Pérez (2007).

Ana Mendieta by María Ruido (2008).

Visual and Other Pleasures by L. Mulvey (2009).

Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art by Cornelia H. Butler and Alexandra Schwartz (2010).

EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art by Kellie Jones (2011).

Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Wanda M. Corn, Charlene G. Garfinkle, and Annelise K. Madsen (2011).

After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Linda Nochlin (2013).

Visualizing Guadalupe: From Black Madonna to Queen of the Americas by Jeanette Favrot Peterson (2014).

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin (2016).


We want this list to grow, so please reblog with your favorite resources on art by women and feminist art.

Hey

if you’re going to be all out there for Auston Matthews being Mexican American in the super white NHL

you should be just as out there for Max Pacioretty who is also Mexican American when his coach is going after him publicly 

and the coach is known for throwing the non white Canadian players under the bus