and makes them explain it

One of my favorite things about Overwatch is how Blizzard just decided it wanted to hit literally every fantasy trope ever while maintaining a futuristic theme, whether they could figure out a way to explain them or not. Dwarf? Make him a Swedish builder with dwarfism. Angel? Easy, doctor in an outfit with wings and a staff. Next. Knight? Idk, theres this german with a rocket hammer?? Cowboy? Something something gang something something mid-west something something revolver……………. Monk? A robot. Make him a fucking robot. A fucking robot monk you heard me. Dragon Ninja Samurai?? Fuck you?? Fuck you!!!!!

  • Male Scifi and Fantasy writers: Look at this !Strong! female character! She can fight and solve puzzles, and ends up with the sidekick not the hero! Isn't she a great character?
  • Everyone: No, she's one-dimensional and still only exists to please the hero's ego
  • Male scifi and fantasy writers: You're never happy! This is how characters are written! Besides, it's much harder for us to write women because we are men!
  • Terry Pratchett: *creates a female character who is literally the embodyment of a dog, sets her up to be the love interest of Protagonist Hero Man.* *writes her as clever, emotionally tortured, lonely and powerful* *uses her to explore difficulties of bisexuality and masculine dominated workforces*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Creates a pair of old witches, one of whom is a virgin and the other who has slept with lots of men.* *makes them best friends, never dismisses one lifestyle of the other, explains lifestyle choices based on characters history and personality, uses this to develop each character as the books progress*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes Sybil Rankin* *makes the powerful rich lady heavy set but beautiful, never plays her by her looks, develops her as she ages, acknowledges the way society views such people and then spits on their attitudes* *does it again with Agnes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes a book about an entire army secretly being women, creates complex female relationships, introduces same sex relationships completely naturally*
  • Terry Pratchett: *takes old joke about female dwarves and uses it to explore gender identity without making it seem forced or unnatural, carefully discusses some of the issues and complextities whilst still making funny and witty observasions and maintaining genuine fantasy tropes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *DOES THIS ALL OVER AND OVER AGAIN, DEVELOPING CHARACTERS AS HIS VEIW OF THE WORLD DEVELOPS AND CAREFULLY APOLOGIZES FOR EARLY MISTAKES*
5

doods done between finals: zelda edition

I just can’t get over how healthy rapunzel and eugene’s relationship is in before ever after ??????

  • eugene being 100% open about his feelings with no hesitation. little boys seeing this swashbuckling hero being emotionally vulnerable is so important.
  • both of them admitting when they’re wrong without making excuses. they explain themselves for communication purposes, but they don’t hesitate to apologize and mean it.
  • just the pure trust between the two of them and the fact that rapunzel wanted to tell eugene everything and only didn’t to protect cassandra and respect her privacy
  • and she doesn’t get mad at eugene for wanting to know what’s going on!! she knows he cares and she doesn’t make him feel guilty for that, she just thanks him for understanding and asks him to be patient with her
  • eugene!!! not pushing her even though it bothers him that she won’t tell him!!! he tells her that it bothers him but he still doesn’t blame her, he doesn’t try to guilt her into it. he explains how he feels but he insists that it’s okay for her to take her time.
  • just how much they communicate with each other in general??? all their “this is how I feel” conversations when so many fictional relationships are built on lack of communication for conflict????
  • “you’re my best friend”
  • EUGENE JUST BRINGS HER A CUPCAKE
  • they just want each other to be happy and have everything they want and i’m cryin

i just love that kids get to see this supportive and healthy relationship where they communicate with each other instead of two people who fight all the time for comedy like I see in so many shows ???? it’s so good and important bye

why does bioware make female characters that look like they eat more pussy in a week than I ever will in my life and make them straight please explain

6

They look at each other, their burdens lifted slightly, their pain not gone but mellowing. Words unsaid. - The Prom script | They both smile. Two old soldiers. - The Yoko Factor script | They are both pained and comforted by the powerful bond between them. - Forever script |

anonymous asked:

I see a lot of talk going on about sigils, but i dont really know what they are, how to make them, how they originated etc. If you could explain that would be cool. Thanks.

A sigil is a symbol with magic properties that help you achieve a certain goal or desire. You can work with them just for practice  or get more into the technique and learn specific sigils. I personally think it´s best if we create them ourselves.
  
✧˖ ° They have been around the world for many many many years (they are ancieeent) and in different cultures ! °˖ ✧

anonymous asked:

Why does Chara have Red eyes? Is it to make them look more evil and will it ever be explained in the comic?

Chara was born with reddish-brown eyes that look reddish in certain kinds of light. And the eyes of wizards tend to light up with their soul color when the soul initially switches positions. Also, Poltergeists tend to take on the color of their soul too.
-TQ

@ everyone saying biphobia is a subset of homophobia and cant be its own independent concept: please show me where lesbians and gay men are discriminated against for feeling attraction to more than one gender. please show me where lesbians and gay men are told they need to “pick a side” and will “settle down as gay/straight eventually”. please show me where lesbians and gay men are dumped bc their partners think being mga makes them more likely to cheat. please explain to me how lesbians and gay men are erased by the statement “you can only be gay or straight.” 

all of those things are struggles faced specifically by bi ppl. if biphobia is really a subset of homophobia, that means it is homophobia, or at least part of homophobia. 

Here’s my hc on how they could have all survived…

K2 somehow overpowers the stormtroopers and gets away, but still locks Jyn and Cassian in the vault.

Bodhi manages to knock the grenade out of the ship like the badass that he is.

Baze lays down cover fire for Chirrut as he walks to pull the lever, and they fight their way back to the ship where Bodhi is waiting (picking up any stray rebels on the way).

Bodhi takes off and flies towards the citadel tower, determined to find Jyn and Cassian. Everyone is shouting at him to just leave them, because the Death Star has fired and the destruction is coming their way. Bodhi refuses, and circles the tower until Chirrut suddenly yells “They’re down there!” and sure enough everyone looks towards the beach and there they are, followed by K2.

They get them aboard the ship just in time, and Bodhi books it out of there. There’s confusion about where they should go, but eventually it’s decided they need to disappear, because the Empire wants them dead and they essentially went rogue from the Rebel Alliance.

Their ship enters hyperspace, then it can cut to Vader’s scene cutting a swath through the rebels.

Some Worldbuilding Thoughts

Recently, I had a fun conversation with @sansjoshiki, who sent us a question on anon but then followed up with my request for more information. (Thanks for doing that!) It’s exciting to be able to answer questions to the best of our ability because we have all the information! 

Anyway, a lot of the stuff I said was not specific to their world, and I think that some of you may enjoy and benefit from it, so here’s some general advice on putting worlds together and incorporating details into your stories!


So, having a single concept (or a few unrelated concepts) and building a world and story from it is completely doable, and can be a lot of fun! But it can also be totally overwhelming and difficult to decide just how much to build, what to focus on, and how to incorporate all of it. 

This process is easier if you have a plot or a character in mind, because you can use that as a lens to decide what parts of the world are important to focus on. For instance, if your character is royalty, do they care how the peasants get water? Will that factoid ever show up? Probably not. With that in mind, it’s fine to have no detail or vaguery in regards to things that aren’t relevant, so don’t strain yourself trying to explain every little thing.

Using guides to help you come up with your world can be extremely helpful to cover all the relevant bases, but no guide will ever match exactly what you need for your story in particular. I think that possibly the best thing for you to do is to start thinking about your character and/or plot. If you don’t have a plot, think about elements in the world that are especially interesting to you and contemplate ways to get those involved in your plot. If you do have a plot, then start thinking about particular aspects of your world that will definitely be involved. If your plot/character(s) are involved with the government, you’ll need to have a pretty solid idea of how that government functions, but if not, that’s a detail you can probably gloss over with only basic details.

If your plot is detailed, start thinking of particular scenes that you want to write in it. For instance, if you want a scene to take place in a store or market, you’ll need to think about how that’s laid out. Is there just one store that sells almost everything? Do most shops specify? Is there an open-forum market with lots of small vendors, or large department stores? How does the currency work? (Actually, “how does the currency work” is a question you should probably answer regardless of whether economics will be a focus, unless the average person on your world doesn’t use currency).

With this in mind, build the parts of the world that pertain to a scene until you can get a sense of what it would be like to be there. Think about real-world situations that are similar; what does it feel like to be in a government building? In a bank? In a convenience store? In a high-priced and specialized boutique? On a farm? How would these things change based on the ways your world works? For instance, if your world no longer employs people to run cash registers and instead uses something like Walmart’s self-checkout, how does that change the experience of going to the store?

Once you have a basic sense for the scene, start writing! You don’t need to know every detail by this step; in fact, don’t try to know every detail. Just place yourself with your character in the scene, and think about what you’d notice and what’s important.

However, be careful about glossing over “unimportant” things, or at least keep in mind that you did. If a detail is irrelevant in an early scene, but then becomes important later, you don’t want to contradict what you’ve said before. I’m guilty of this; I write along willy-nilly, and sometimes when I’m rereading, I realized that a detail I develop well in chapter 5 is contradicted by something I handwaved in chapter 2. This is fixable, of course, but you might save yourself a little headache by thinking about it beforehand. Having to rewrite what used to be the perfect scene because one detail changes everything is annoying.

Also, don’t be tempted to start from the very beginning with this method of worldbuilding a single scene; think of scenes that are critical to your story and what they’ll entail, and work backwards to the ones that are less critical.

Ultimately, don’t forget that worldbuilding shouldn’t get wholly in the way of your writing. It can be lots of fun and create a great story, but if you find yourself never starting because you don’t have all the details in place, relax.

Sometimes, “Just start writing” can be the best thing when you’re stuck with worldbuilding. If a detail is needed to make the story work, or to make the world believable, you’ll realize that as you go, and then you can pause, figure it out, and then carry on.

As for putting an adequate amount of world detail in, we’ve done a few posts about that in past. I’ll say a few words about that:

Putting detail in can be tricky, because you know all these things about your world and many of them might be working together to create a scene. However, you don’t want to annoy or bore your reader, so you have to limit yourself. Having a beta reader can be great for that, because they can let you know when you have too much or too little detail. Personally, I think that erring on the side of too little and then having your beta reader tell you so is best. If you’re confusing your readers, you’ll need to put more detail in, but people are less likely to tell you when you have too much detail. Try to keep in mind what’s essential for the world, and also what’s abnormal. Your character isn’t likely to be thinking about how the space-age toilet works (unless they work in the sci-fi equivalent of plumbing), and even though knowing what happens to the waste can be important to the author, it is unlikely to come up in a story. Put yourself in that situation, remind yourself that everything you’ve built is the norm for that world, and then think about what you’d actually notice.

If you have abnormal things going on, those are easier to explain and make it make sense that you are explaining them. This can also be used to show what the norm is: “Instead of just going into the vaporizer like it always did, [character]’s urine was sitting in the receptacle, making the bathroom smell bad.” Bam, now we know that toilets have vaporizers and that this one is malfunctioning.


Thanks for reading, and happy building! -Werew

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Alien Boy

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9 Reasons Why the New “Beauty and the Beast” is Better Than the 1991 Original

I know, such a crazy notion, but as a die-hard fan of the original 1991 animated classic, as a young woman who adored Belle and looked up to her as a young girl, and as someone who loves Disney, I truly believe that while the cartoon classic is phenomenal, the new live-action reimagining is astoundingly better. Here are my reasons why:

1. Back-story 

In the original I always had SO MANY QUESTIONS. Mainly–how in the hell did a village less than a few miles away not know that a giant castle that once was home to a wealthy and powerful Prince was RIGHT THERE? Who was the Prince ruling over if the villagers had no clue this place and this beast existed? Why were the servants cursed if they weren’t the ones who turned the old woman away? Why was the Prince so cold-hearted, arrogant, and shallow? The prologue amongst other scenes in the 2017 film address all these questions.

We learn that the enchantress placed a spell on the villagers to make them forget about the Prince and everyone in the castle. This explains how no one knew it was there, and also the sense of lawlessness in the village, because if their ruler–the Prince–vanished, and no one remembered him then whose in charge? Gaston? No wonder it’s a mess there.

We also learn why Beast is so cold-hearted, we learn his mother died when he was young and his father was emotionally abusive, and raised him to be a spoiled, arrogant, shallow shell of a man. We also learn that the servants witnessed the emotional abuse of this child and did nothing to stop it–deeming them worthy of punishment for being so cowardly and selfish as to not help the Prince when he was young.

Now someone asked me why the hell Chip and the dog were cursed too, they didn’t do anything. My theory is the curse was really only taking effect inside the ballroom, all the servants were in there for the ball, and in the opening sequence we see Chip running in to see what’s the matter and Mrs. Potts running after him–terrified. I believe she sensed the danger in the ballroom, and was trying to save Chip from meeting the same fate as the rest of them, and ultimately–she failed. The Maestro and Madame de Garderobe’s dog was in the ballroom as well, so I guess he was just unlucky also.

We also learn that Cogsworth and Mrs. Potts had spouses who must’ve been away from the castle when the spell was cast, causing them tragically (at least in Mrs. Potts case) to be forgotten by their loves.


2. Belle the Feminist Activist

It was never made clear in the cartoon film that it wasn’t just ‘odd’ that Belle liked reading it was ‘odd’ that a low-born woman in 18th century France even COULD read. It wouldn’t occur to children (it certainly didn’t to me) that her reading in public is practically illegal and worthy of public shame. In the cartoon it was just all ‘lol books are lame,’ In the live action not only does Belle not have a town bookshop to go to (because seriously, why would a town of mostly illiterate people who hate reading have a bookshop) she is merely friends with the Priest who owns less than a dozen books. THAT IS ALL SHE HAS. And then she teaches another young girl how to read and is publicly shamed for it, and still doesn’t back down, because she believes that women deserve the same rights as men. 

In the beginning sequence of the town, we literally see boys marching into school while the girls are stuck doing the wash. Belle also refuses to waste valuable reading time on the laundry–so girl INVENTS A WASHING MACHINE! 

When Belle gets to the castle, she tricks the Beast into taking her instead. She tries savvy ways to escape. She never flings herself onto the bed and cries like in the cartoon. She fights every damn second.

In the end she doesn’t even change out of her ballgown to go save her father, she just hops on her horse and goes. 

Belle was ALWAYS strong, but this 2017 Belle is formidable and a force to be reckoned with.


3. Tragic love

In the 1991 film, the wardrobe was a goofy character there for laughs, as was Plumette. Also, Lumiere and Plumette’s relationship in the cartoon was creepy and borderline sexual harassment. It was pure lust. In this version, they are madly in love and Lumiere clearly cares about her so much. 

We also see Madama de Garderobe and Maestro Cadenza (a brilliant new character) who are also madly in love, but unlike Lumiere and Plumette can’t even be with one another during the curse due to the stationary limitations as the objects they’ve been cursed to be. By the time Madame finally makes her way downstairs to be with Maestro it is too late, the curse is taking away their life. The moment when Lumiere realizes he has lost Plumette, and where Maestro realizes he has lost Madame, add a heart-breaking very raw and real layer to the story. It’s not just about Belle and Beast, these servants aren’t just funny objects that talk, they were people too. They had a life and loves and that was stolen from them just as it was the Beast.

4. Papa and Belle’s Motherless Backstory

In the cartoon, Belle’s father is simply a goofy character. He’s a blithering idiot who makes pointless inventions. In this version, he is an artist who had to leave his plagued wife behind in Paris in order to save their only daughter. We see him live with the pain of this everyday. We see him and Belle have a beautiful, genuine relationship. We see him fight whole-heartedly for Belle. We see him give her courage and strength to never back down from who she is.

And we learn something that the cartoon NEVER gave us–we learn of Belle’s mother. Lost to the plague when Belle was a babe, with nothing but a rose-shaped rattle to remember her by, that her Father captured in a painting. Explaining why Belle always asks for one. We learn that Belle–like her father and mother–is willing to sacrifice everything for the ones that she loves.


5. Classic Fairytale Homage 

While the cartoon held almost no remnants of the original fairytale written over 500 years ago, or the original French film made in the 40s, the 2017 version pays homage to both. 

Belle asking for simply a rose from her father’s travels, as well as Beast and his servants preparing Maurice a fire and dinner when he arrives at the castle, but Beast only growing angry when Maurice steals the rose–is taken directly from the pages of the fairytale. 

We also see another fun easter egg reference to the french film: when Maurice walks up to the door–he sees the front lantern is being held by what looks like a human arm made of stone, which in the French film, was an incredibly iconic scene when Belle walks through the dungeon to find her father.


6. A Real Antagonist

Cartoon Gaston is again, a 2D character there to provide some conflict at the end. The 2017 version shows him as the epitome of prejudice, hatred and sexism. He expresses many times throughout the film the the sees Belle as prey for him to hunt. He leaves Maurice for dead in the wood. The lyrics of the mob song were even changed to include his verse “but I know they all will follow, for in times like this they do just as I say.” Gaston is the scariest Disney villain because people like him exist in real-life. Gaston and his angry mob of blind-followers provide a tangible conflict outside of the curse that the cartoon simply did not provide.


7. A Shared Love of Reading

It never made a damn bit of sense in the 1991 cartoon and the Broadway musical adaptation–that Beast was illiterate. If ANYONE during the time could read it sure as hell would’ve been the wealthy Prince. All aristocracy could read and most men knew how to read a little. So yeah, a Prince could read.

So the fact that he and Belle share a love of reading adds and element to their friendship bred romance that didn’t exist prior to this reimagining.


8. New Music

What would Beauty and the Beast be without those iconic numbers like: ‘Belle,’ ‘Gaston,’ ‘Be Our Guest,’ and of course, the title song–made famous by Angela Lansbury– ‘Beauty and the Beast.’ When Broadway adapted the cartoon film years ago, they added some songs of their own, such as the Broadway-Buff-Beloved number– ‘Home.’ So naturally it would’ve been easy for the writers and directors of this film to just buy the rights to those songs and call it a day. Instead we got 5 gorgeous new numbers, and 1 new reprise. We got the opening ‘Aria,’ sung at the Prince’s beginning ball by Madame de Garderobe, we get ‘How Does a Moment Last Forever,’ sung by Maurice, singing about remembering his late wife. Then we later get the Montmartre of this song sung by Belle as she recalls the lost ‘Paris of her childhood,’ in an all new scene where her and Beast use a magic book to travel to the attic where she lost her mother. We get ‘Days in the Sun,’ where we hear from the servants and the pain they feel as well living under the curse. We get, ‘Evermore,’ the torrid, angst-filled lamenting ballad Beast sings when he let’s Belle go. And lastly, we get a never before heard reprise of ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ sung by Mrs. Potts ( Emma Thompson) at Belle and Beast’s wedding. These news songs add more passion to the film. (Evermore is my personal favorite)

9. Gay Lefou

It’s about damn time. Cartoon Lefou is definitely alluded to being in-love with Gaston, but Josh Gads blatantly homosexual portrayal was brilliant, and as a member of the queer community–made me so happy.

Yes, in ‘Frozen’ we got the one throw-away joke about Oaken being gay, but it was 0.5 seconds long and barely delved into. In this 2017 film, Lefou makes many sexual innuendos towards Gaston, publicly cuddles Gaston, and in the end dances happily with another queer fellow at Belle and Beast’s wedding, and this is an amazing step forward for the Disney franchise to start having openly queer characters in their films.


SO THERE YOU HAVE IT! My 9 reasons why the 2017 Beauty and the Beast is better than the 1991 original. I still love the original and it will always have a fond place in my heart–but when movie nights of the future come round, I will opt to put on the 2017 version instead, and experience a Tale as Old as Time, retold for a new generation.

Look, all I’m saying is Lena 100% checked Alex out as soon as she waked in and saw her. 

Lena L Corp gayest vibe ever Luthor was all “oh, i know you. you saved my life.” and Alex smol baby gay Danvers gave her the gentlest smile and introduced herself. 

That’s all I’m saying.