and make a powerpoint

Surround yourself with the kids you guys. They’ll make you forget about all worries including that Powerpoint due at midnight that you haven’t started because you’re are still in denial that you even have summer class. 

stupid things that nobody tells you about studyblr aesthetic
  • like 99.9999% of people have that little excess ink when you use a highlighter its so normal i cant even
  • dont beat yourself up over slightly wonky lines??? you can fix it later just dont dont dont
  • handwriting doesnt even matter if its legible write legibly aesthetic doesnt even matter tbh
  • your notes!!!! are fine!!!!! 99% chance that if you put effort into them someone will compliment you
  • not unrelated there was this girl w these amazing!!! physics notes and she was like ohh but they’re not as aesthetic as yours and its like??? bro??? im reading your notes right now what does this say about mine lmao
  • sometimes bullet journals are overrated
  • sometimes expensive planners are overrated
  • dont drop a ton of money on a notebook if you have tested out the paper with your main stationery because you’ll  r e g r e t
  • testing paper!!!! is so important like knowing what you’re writing on makes a difference 
  • but also who gives its just paper?? if it doesnt matter that much to you dont sweat it just use what makes you feel comfortable
  • everybody has their own preferences like i prefer light grey dots or maybe a grid if i have to but nO! BLACK! LINES!!!! but i have friends who love those notebooks with heavy lines bc it makes them feel grounded its all about doing what you love
  • legit buying mildliners doesnt even matter that much dont bother they’re overpriced like 999999% of the time
  • muji !!!! is lowkey overrated dont buy overpriced products bc its Not Worth It its like a nicer jp target no not really but also completely
  • forget ab the name brands bc that doesn’t even matter!!!! if you like what you’re using then use it !!! if your method is efficient then use it!!!! and if you’re really trying to develop an aesthetic it’ll come to you through what you already have
  • like ofc its ok to look at other people for inspo and stuff just your aesthetic is your own!!! its like a tree !! every single tree is different!!! but they’re all still wonderful right??? so let your aesthetic grow!!!!
  • good luck bro !!!! have fun planting those aesthetic (memes) <3 
10

when they thought i was kidding when i said i’d make a powerpoint to explain why they need to descend into sports anime hell with me

10

all my friends are stressed up to their eyeballs right now, and as it’s exam season hell in the UK, i made a ““helpful”” powerpoint about it. ft. shitty clipart. on a calming pink background b/c it’s pretty and i like it
Enjoy my friends, i hope this helps :)

you want marvel content where they don’t muck around with hydra’s origins + identity?  agents of shield.  the most recent arc has just been.  so damn relevant and just.  SO GOOD.  LISTEN I’M RECOMMENDING THIS SHOW, THAT’S WHAT’S HAPPENING HERE.  THIS IS THE GOOD TELEVISION.

youtube

So, do you follow me for something other then Generator Rex? Probably. But if you have never seen the show, PLEASE WATCH THIS IT’S THE FIRST 2 MINUTES OF THE FIRST EPISODE. 

Do you like complex characters, kids with superpowers used as weapons and the moral implications that come with it, and tons of cool monster body horror? This is the show for you!

There’s an overarching plot about Rex finding his family and past since he has amesia, but there’s also strong found family themes with his friends and guardians.

It gets the story down, establishes Rex’s voice and character, and shows one of his builds. The entire show is available on kisscartoon and watchcartoononline, and trust me, it’s absolutely worth it. The first two seasons are some of the best of any cartoon I know- recent ones included.

Rex’s hispanic heritage is made an important part of the show, which is cool, and there’s a ton of cool female characters.

I want more people to know and appreciate this show.

The Pepsi Marketing Team: A dialogue

Scene: Three white dudes sitting around a meeting table, at Pepsi HQ. 

Marketing dude 1: So guys, I’ve been thinking, protests are huge right now. How about we integrate protests into our commercial concept?

Marketing dude 2: Great idea, Chad! Man, what is all that protesting about anyway?

CHAD: I have no idea Bryce, but its HOT.

Marketing dude 3: You know what else is HOT? The Kardashians.

CHAD: Good thinking, Brad. So how can we put it all together?

BRYCE: I’ve got it guys. So here’s the scene, a protest , right–

CHAD, interjecting: — not political though, like, just a protest

BRYCE: (excitedly) yeah, yeah exactly. A protest is going on, and then switch scenes– Kendall is doing a photo shoot— 

BRAD: –You know she’s a model? 

CHAD: Wow, so hard-working.

BRYCE: –anyway she sees the protest. And she’s like, so “woke” right–

BRAD: –Woke?

CHAD: That’s a hot phrase right now.

BRAD: What does it mean? 

BRYCE: It means like, “trendy”, but with politics or whatever.

CHAD: That doesn’t sound quite right.

BRYCE: Whatever. ANYWAY, So Kendall is like “oh a protest!” and the crowd of protesters approach a wall of police–

BRAD (excitedly) : in riot gear???!

CHAD: No no, not riot gear, we don’t want to make the police look bad.

BRYCE: Ok yeah. they’re monitoring peacefully. and the protesters are all happy and dancing.

CHAD: yeah man, I went to Coachella once, and that’s totally like a protest, so we can do like a Coachella aesthetic.

BRAD: Nice.

BRYCE: OK ok guys so here’s the kicker right? Kendall joins the protest, and she’s got a Pepsi, right? And so she walks up to one of the police, and she gives him a Pepsi- and then like, the protest is solved!

BRAD: OH man that is SO good

CHAD: Bryce you are a genius.

(A manager pokes his head into the meeting room)

MANAGER:  Hey guys, what have you got for me so far?

CHAD: Well, we’ve got a kind of “Pepsi solves World Peace” vibe going. 

MANAGER: That sounds pretty good– hey make sure you throw some “diversity” in there, ok? Our market testing numbers show that people like that.

CHAD: Yeah of course- already on it!

(Manager smacks the door frame twice, then leaves)

BRAD: Well…. Kendall is like… not white, right?

BRYCE: I’m not sure dude, but “Kardashian” doesn’t sound white

CHAD: “Jenner” does though….

BRAD: ok ok, we’ll find a way to get some diversity in there. We can ask Areeb from product management!

BRYCE: Nice. 

CHAD: Ok so the idea is; An apolitical protest is going on– for world peace or something– and Kendall sees it while she is modeling. And she’s so “woke” so she leaves her shoot to join the cause. She’s like, just another person, “just like everyone else” type of deal. 

Cut in Coachella scenes- but like– with diversity– she moves through the crowd, she’s got the Pepsi, and she brings the Pepsi to the police.

BRAD: The upstanding professional “serve and protect-ors”

CHAD: Exactly. So she brings the Pepsi to the police and the vibe is, like, a peace-offering 

BRYCE: World peace is solved

BRAD: World peace is solved!

CHAD: nice work everyone. I’ll make a powerpoint. 

7

happy birthday @morisuke-kun!! (ノ^ヮ^)ノ*:・゚✧

hello it is some of the cool space dudes from connected, a cool space story where they are in space 

9

Crash Course in Russian | The Alphabet

Ok people so I’m thinking of making some Russian language powerpoints.  I know a lot of you like ‘quick and dirty’ language learning (as do I) so I figure I might as well simplify some of my own notes and share them here.

The first set I’m uploading is the Cyrillic alphabet. I know there are TONS of these out there but I personally can’t stand graphics/drawings or ‘tips & tricks’ on my study materials because I find that immensely distracting, so I’ve put together a set which I find much more aesthetically pleasing.

I’ve included some short notes on palatalization but otherwise everything is greatly simplified.  Again, I plan for this series to be a ‘quick and dirty’ overview for those who have little to no familiarity with the language and who don’t plan to study it very seriously.  Alternatively this series can serve as scaffolding material for those to plan to learn the language in the future.

As a disclaimer, I am not a native speaker of Russian and though I will be putting a lot of effort into these there are bound to be some mistakes.  I appreciate any kind feedback or corrections.

ENJOY <3

Other sets in this series:
The Cursive Alphabet | Tips on Pronunciation

For work reasons, I regularly have to stand up in front of a bunch of people I have never met before, and talk to them. Usually it’s about fifteen people, but at conference time my seminars have upwards of seventy-five people or more in the audience.

For years, public speaking was not my favorite thing; I dreaded it more than anything else in the world. But I love it now, and I’ve been told I’m good at it, so I’m gonna share some tips. 

  1. Freak out. Go ahead. Give yourself permission to panic about having to stand up in front of a bunch of people and give a speech. Go. Panic, scream, cry, complain to the world. Just get it out of your system - really get it all out in one go. You can have anywhere from ten minutes to three hours, depending on how close this due date is. But however long you take, know that when you’re done freaking out, that’s it - it’s work time now.
  2. Make an outline. Write down the main points you want to cover. Dates, theories, equations, all of the Big Stuff. Write them all down in the beginning, so you won’t forget them later.
  3. Once the Big Stuff is written down, start filling in details: what’s important about this date, explain this theory, what’s the application for this equation. If it seems relevant, give examples (but limit it to one or two easy examples per item; overfilling with examples can lead to your audience forgetting what you were talking about)
  4. If you are making a PowerPoint - start transferring that outline into your slides. Don’t worry about design, format, animations, none of that right now. It shouldn’t be pretty at the beginning, all you need is your information on the slides. Make sure your slides are simple and not stuffed with information. Font size should be at least 28 for every bit of text - if you need to shrink it down to fit your information on, move it to the next slide or user fewer words.
  5. Write your speech in bullet points. Resist the urge to write it out word-for-word. If you write it out word-for-word and practice from that and nothing else, one of two things is probably going to happen: you will recite the speech as you have written and it will come across as a recitation rather than a presentation, or you will forget a word somewhere in the middle and stumble over yourself. Writing your speech in bullet points lets you fill in the transitions as you’re practicing; your flow will be more even and natural when you’re speaking, and you won’t get caught up in what the next word is supposed to be.
  6. Practice. Practice, practice, practice. Do not, under any circumstances, wing it. If you wing it, you will feel unprepared, so you will come across as unprepared, and you will probably forget important details or be surprised when a particular slide shows up. Practice until you are tired of your topic, practice until you want to murder your topic and bury it out in the back.
  7. There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of a sentence and realizing you have no more air left. When you’re practicing, make note of where you should breathe.
  8. Practice with an audience that can interact with you (your dog is a loving and supportive friend, but your dog can’t tell that you’re talking too fast). You need to give your speech to someone who will give you honest feedback - it can be an audience of one. Make it clear to them how you want their help: do you want them to critique your content, your presentation skills, or both.
  9. Preparation is equally as important as practicing. Check your PowerPoint - are all your animations working correctly? Is everything spelled right? Do you have legible notecards written in a way that will help you? Do you have an outfit planned (you want to look nice, but you also want to be comfortable)?
  10. Three days before, stop tweaking it. Stop making major changes. Go ahead and change the wording, but do not add any new content (and do not remove content unless it really is garbage). Up until now you’ve been practicing with a certain set of content, and throwing new content in at the last minute can unsettle your pacing and structure - it’s information you haven’t had nearly as much time as practice.
  11. One day before, leave it alone completely. It’s locked. Done. It’ll be what it’ll be. 24 hours before your speech is not the time to making any kind of adjustments to it. You’ve practiced what you have, you know you can rock what you have, so you’re going to give what you have.
  12. If steps 9 and 10 have both failed for any number of reasons (which is fine! happens to me all the time), then this is the rule you need to pay attention to. For the love of everything you find holy, do not make changes to your speech right before you give it. This has the same effect as winging it, and all the practice you’ve done will be for nothing.
  13. Get a good night’s sleep. Be hydrated. Eat breakfast (but not a super big special breakfast that might upset your stomach; eat your normal breakfast, even if that’s toaster pastries and a can of soda). Dress in layers, so you can remove or add a layer as necessary and not be freezing or sweating up there.
  14. Go first, if you have the option. Seriously. Volunteer to go first. You’ll get it out of the way, and you’ll be done. More importantly, you won’t be watching everyone else’s presentations/speeches while worrying about your own - that’s a super easy way to psych yourself out. So go first, or at least go early.

Other tips!

  1. Watch stand-up comedy. What stand-up comedy teaches you is timing, pacing, and audience interaction. Stand-up comics stand in front of people and talk to them for a living - they just happen to be funny when they do it. Study them for timing and pacing: where do they pause, for how long, how do they transition two wildly different topics together, etc. Stand-up comics are great at handling unpredictable audiences.
  2. PowerPoint animations: never use slide transitions, and the only animation you should ever use is “appear.” The “appear” animation controls what’s on the slide at any given time and is helpful for both you and the audience (though don’t make stuff disappear once it’s already on the slide). You won’t rush over yourself trying to move on to the next topic, because the next topic isn’t visible yet.
  3. Also on PowerPoint: know where your slides end. Create a little circle or square in the bottom corner that’s just a shade or two darker than the background color, and have it be the last thing to appear on the slide. Your audience won’t notice it, but it’ll be an indicator for you that the slide’s over and you’re moving on.
  4. If it’s speech with a time limit, have a buddy keep time by holding up a piece of paper with how much time you have remaining. Since you’ve practiced, you should know about how long your speech is, but you may speed up or slow down in front of people and you need to know about that. Be clear with them up front about what they need to tell you: you don’t want to be suddenly blindsided with 2:00 LEFT, but neither do you want to be warned every five minutes.
  5. Have a buddy give you signals. I talk super fast in front of people, so I always have someone in the back of the room to give me the “slow down” hand signal. You may also get really quiet, and you need someone to tell you to speak up. If at all possible, you want to adjust your speed or volume before someone in the audience points it out to you, which can interrupt your rhythm and train of thought.
  6. If you talk with your hands, talk with your hands. If you want to stand still, stand still. If you like jokes, tell jokes. If you need Star Trek references, make them. Let yourself be yourself. You’re already in an uncomfortable situation, and trying to silence something fundamental about who you are is going to make it so much worse. Be yourself in front of a crowd - you will be a lot more interesting, and a lot more fun (and have a lot more fun), than everyone else who’s trying to be as flat as possible.

If you have any questions or want some extra advice or anything, I’m happy to help!

Writing a bilingual character: tips

(This is from my own personal experience as a Chinese person who’s better at English, my “first” language, than Chinese, my “second” language.)

When your character is going speak unintentionally in their second language instead of their first one:
• When they’re tired, they could slip up and accidentally start a sentence with their second language. Generally, though, they realise and correct themselves before finishing the sentence
• When they were just thinking in their second language/ talking to someone in their second language. The shift from one language to the other is where they could get caught up
• If they were startled, after just speaking/thinking in their second language.

Keep in mind though, that people very experienced in both languages will probably not be tripped up as often. Your character who has been speaking their second language for 10 years is going to trip up a lot less than your character who’s only known their second language for 5 years.

Unrealistic scenarios:
• Slipping into their second language in the middle of a sentence accidentally, unless they forgot a word they needed to use
Unrealistic: “Ok so you’re going to go down the hall and— 他妈的! I forgot my homework on my desk! Gotta run and get it” (The Chinese is a swear)
Realistic: “We’re going to need a… 车? What do you guys call that again?” (The Chinese character is the one for car)

• Suddenly saying something in their second language, when they were just conversing in their first language. There’s a mental switch you need to make when changing from a conversation in one language to a conversation in another which makes those situations pretty unlikely.
Person 1: “Could you send the powerpoint to me?”
Person 2: “Just did that. Did you get the email yet?”
Person 1: “我– oh whoops. Sorry! Yeah, I just got it”
(Chinese character is the character for “I”)

Bilingual things you could include in your writing:
• Thinking in one language when doing one specific thing. For instance, I almost always do Maths in Chinese. The whole structure of the language and how the words for numbers work out means it’s a lot easier in Chinese than English.

• A conversation that’s a mess of two languages all mashed together. Frankenlanguages. As stated before, I’m personally better at English than Chinese. So, when I’m speaking in Chinese, it’s often with English words interspersed throughout when I forget the Chinese word. In that case, there is no mental shift between languages needed. Instead, you pull from both languages at once. Ex: “我今天在学校的时候跟我的 Chemistry 老师 discuss 我的essay on the effects of acid rain on 咯房的 roofs.” (Translation: today, at school, my Chemistry teacher and I discussed my essay on the effects of acid rain on the roofs of buildings.)

• Your character could speak one language at home and another language when at work/school/with friends. For example, I speak Chinese when I’m at home with my Chinese family and I speak English everywhere else because I live in Canada. This makes for interesting situations where, even though I am highly proficient in English, I lack some basic vocabulary. What is a blouse? Not really sure to be honest. I used to get “dress” and “skirt” confused a lot because I only used Chinese to refer to those things and thus never built up my English vocabulary in those areas. I’ve had to awkwardly describe the fruit I was looking for in stores before because I didn’t know the English name for it.

Anyway, if you need help with writing a bilingual character, feel free to shoot me an ask!