and it's visually stunning

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((OOC: I truly don’t know a better way to celebrate the one year mark of having this blog. It has been a crazy and strange twelve months, but I wouldn’t change them for the world. So from the bottom of my heart, thank you for joining me on this journey, thank you for sticking around, and here’s to many more years of memories to come.))

@sirussly
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20/366 movies: Equals (2015)

“Ever since we were kids it’s been drilled into us that our purpose is to explore the universe, you know? Outer space is where we’ll find the answers to why we’re here and where we come from. It’s like everyone’s searching for these answers 800 million miles away and the truth is the answers are right in front of us… I know why I’m here.” “Me too.”

Q&A: Guillermo del Toro announces ‘Trollhunters’ season 2

Last Christmas, sometime while you either weren’t looking or were solely focused on graver matters, Netflix released what’s shaping up to be its most-watched children’s series ever, from one of the industry’s most whimsical storytellers — and if the show’s demographic-dashing storyline didn’t catch your eye the first go-round, you’re being summoned by the storyteller himself to catch on for season 2.

Trollhunters comes from Guillermo del Toro and marks both a first for the filmmaker — a bingeable creation for Netflix — and a return to form by way of a long-standing history with DreamWorks Animation, where Del Toro cut his teeth in the medium. EW can exclusively reveal that, following the successful run of the first 26 episodes, a second season of 13 episodes will arrive later this year, with production already long underway for season 2.

The show follows the adventures of Jim (Anton Yelchin, who recorded the first season before his death in June), a teenager-turned-warrior called upon by an underground civilization of trolls to defend their way of life from both humans and evil trolls alike. The returning cast includes Charlie Saxton and Lexi Medrano as Jim’s cohorts Toby and Claire, Kelsey Grammer as his troll mentor Blinky, and Clancy Brown as the series’ big bad, Gunmar.

What’s important to know about Trollhunters and its expansive world-building is that despite the show’s impending viewership pedigree, its stunning visuals shouldn’t be construed as simply for kids. As Del Toro himself tells it, Trollhunters is for kids in the same way as Pacific Rim and Hellboy were for kids — which is to say, they straddle the optics of genre in a way that much (although definitely not all) of the director’s work does.

To announce season 2, Del Toro spoke with EW about the validation of renewal, how the show will handle the loss of Yelchin, and where the series — and Del Toro himself — will go from here.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: It seems like you have some news to share.
GUILLERMO DEL TORO:
Well, we got very good news about how many people were watching the series, but we got confirmation that the next episodes are a go. We’ve been working on a second season for a while now because we knew that if everything went right, we could proceed. We’re going to go ahead and now continue, rather than start, because we’ve been doing it for more than a year. The reality and the beauty of this is that we can continue not only the storyline and the characters, but we have a huge swath of work from Anton that allows us to continue Anton through more than half the season.

How did you approach the show following the loss of Anton?From the get-go, even in the first season, we knew we wanted to preserve as much of the performance of Anton as possible, both from an artistic and a human point of view, and also simply because I think it’s a tribute to what we think he brings to the role of Jim. From the beginning when we planned the writers’ room, we set out a map of 52 episodes, and created arcs that break every 13, and those were planned four years ago. So we have been recording Kelsey Grammer, Anton, Ron Perlman, Clancy Brown, everybody involved in the series for years and years. And there was a break in the arc in the right episode that allows us to preserve all the work that Anton did that was phenomenal. At the end of recording sessions, Anton did one of the most complex episodes and then he looked at the pilot, complete, and there was a great moment in which he was able to see the work and do a really complicated episode in which he did multiple voices and we were all so proud and so close when we lost him. And now I can tell you, we’re not only going to second season, but we’re going to be able to preserve a really large part of it with Anton’s voice.

Does his passing change anything in your initial plan, or are you sticking to it?Actually, coincidentally, we have an event in the last episode Anton did which allows us to sort of change his voice slightly, so the character stays — but we didn’t plan this. It was pure serendipity that we had that in the works. The beats of the second season have been set for years, and as of now, we have not altered or needed to alter a single beat.

Since Trollhunters is meticulously mapped out and you’ve been working closely on it for years, let me ask: what surprised you at the end of season 1 that you perhaps didn’t anticipate?This is a series in which I am collaborating with a guy I admire tremendously, which is Marc Guggenheim, and with Rodrigo Blaas, who has been my partner in this whole adventure. I think the thing that surprised me—but it was episode by episode—was how emotional I felt about things that we had put on paper, that we had put in pencil. We had a unique endowment. I really think Trollhunters was done in a way that I have never experienced because, unlike a $150 million animated movie, we were working with TV budgets, but we said, “We have to be ambitious to look and feel like a movie. We have to be much more ambitious than our budget.” And what was really surprising is that I promised, and offered, at every creative step, to protect my team from notes and interference. I said, “This is going to be a show done by creators.” And as we started to deliver , what I found very moving is that you ended up seeing people, seeing animators go the extra mile to animate really well. You saw cinematographers going the extra mile to light really well. We had layout and story guys going the extra mile because they knew… most of the time, the story and storyboard departments on an animated project think of the work as disposable. They know that a sequence they do is going to go through 20 incarnations. And I promised them, you’re not going to come back a month later and find out that you need to do five versions. And everybody felt this is being delivered on. We are working with freedom, so let’s go the extra mile, first time around. And it made a huge difference in the quality of the show, because our budget, monetarily, was the same, but our budget, humanly, was enormous.

Let’s talk season 2’s story. If you didn’t proceed on a second season, the cliffhanger sending Jim to the Darklands would have been brutal. I’m working with one of the best producers in animation. His name is Chad Hammes, and Christina Steinberg, whom with I had worked a couple of times in the past at DreamWorks. And we said from the beginning, we have to bet that we’re going to deliver something really good, and we’re going to get the 52. So part of the thing is, we’ve been animating and blocking, and we have a much stronger second season already in the process. We made the decision based on binge-watching, you know? As we were going through the first season — which really is two seasons because it’s 26 — I started watching the animatics, three or four in a row. I would cancel my flight and stay. I would take three episodes with me. And I started naturally finding how much, at the end of every episode, I wanted to watch the next. And we said, if we can maintain that rhythm, that sort of addictive pace, through 26 episodes, we’re going to get a second season.

Is Jim in the Darklands all season long, or is it just a quick visit?The Darklands are quite an ordeal in themselves. They are not a light walk in the park. They are not a one-action sequence and we go away. There’s a good in the Darklands. We have character recalls that were introduced in the first season that you didn’t know how they’d pay off, or you thought you’d knew how they pay off, and you reencounter them and go, “Oh, so this is who the mysterious lady that gives supernatural powers to Angor Rot is,” for example. She becomes quite a character in the second season. You reencounter a character I love — I won’t tell you who — but we reencounter that character now in the Darklands. We resolve a lot more of the backstory of Blinky and AAARRRGGHH!!!, for example. And of course, the Mexican dentist comes back.

Meanwhile, what will Toby and Claire get up to while Jim’s gone?Well, the second season gives a chance for them to become Trollhunters on their own, but the two worlds are constantly linked. We find out some of the surprisingly complex politics in the world of trolls in regards to the Darklands, and the arc is really very beautiful in the second season. Very heroic, I would say.

RELATED: Hear more of the latest TV news from this week

Is there a single piece of Trollhunters merchandise you hold most dear?We created a couple characters to pitch the series to Jeffrey , and they were done in 3-D, and Jeffrey gave them to me after the consumer products department was done with them, and they were really battered. They were missing a hand, a nose… they were really broken. So I bought some epoxy clay and I repaired them and repainted them in my garage. Now they are on my desk because they were always two of my favorite three-dimensional pieces when we were pitching the series. It’s AAARRRGGHH!!! with Toby in his hand, and one of my favorite characters, which is Not Enrique.

The show is unofficially tracking as Netflix’s most-watched kids’ series ever. What does that mean to you considering this is not just a project, but one of deep passion for you?All of my life I’ve been doing animation. I did it as a teenager. That’s how I started. I started doing clay animation. I went and did this really prolonged sort of internship at DreamWorks for six or seven years, getting my footing on Puss in Boots, Kung Fu Panda 2 and 3, Megamind, Rise of the Guardians… and I really feel that it’s a world that is integral to who I am. If you know my collection, a large portion of my collection is original Disney concept art, and a large portion of my library is an animation library. Forty minutes or more of Pacific Rim was basically animation. I was directing an animated movie within that movie. And I think it’s not a side interest. I know how integral it is to who I want to be as a storyteller and the rest of my immediate future.

Do you feel pulled more towards family-friendly fare now?I’ve done movies that I would definitely not recommend to children. But I’ve done movies that I wholeheartedly always thought they were for young kids. Not 7 or 8, but certainly 10 or older, like Hellboy or Pacific Rim. I really wanted them to have heroes and adventures that were un-ironic, not post-modern, and heartfelt. I think in many ways, the Charlie Hunnam character in Pacific Rim is a little bit like Jim. He’s not a complicated guy. He’s good-hearted. They don’t need to be complicated by post-modern winking or ironic satiric logic. They are really earnest and heartfelt.

What’s coming up next for you?I’m finishing The Shape of Water, and that is not a kids’ movie at all. I would never dream of that. And I want to finish or continue other projects that are of a completely different nature. The thing is, I am not a brand. I am an acquired taste. And as such, I don’t want to be defined by what I’ve done, but what I do next.

Trollhunters season 1 is currently available to stream on Netflix.

halliescomut  asked:

Saw your post about Akira interiors/design. It's sucha visually stunning movie. They keep talking about a live action movie, but do you think it's possible that a GOOD live-action version of Akira could ever be made? I feel like it kind of a lightening in a bottle type of movie.

It’s impossible to translate to live action many of the things that make the original anime so lush and satisfying. That said, it’s entirely possible to do an interpretation of it that works in live action, if the audience is willing to give it the opportunity to be its own thing.

All of that said, I’d much prefer that the money is invested into an amazing original work (or, better yet, multiple original works) instead of reimagining or rebooting or remaking something that already exists.

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Earth’s Cosmic Address

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The Toledo Cathedral is considered by many the pinnacle of the Spanish Gothic style. Both its exterior and interior are stunning, and its visual appeal could only be surpassed by the cathedral’s interesting history. 

The temple was actually built on top of a Muslim mosque, and before that it had been a church in the sixth century during the reign of the Visigoth King Recaredo. King San Fernando and the archbishop began building the new church in 1226.

“Guardians of the Galaxy” is an emotional dense, culturally diverse, and thrilling blast of a ride with some finally badass female characters too boot.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 continues the team’s adventures as they unravel the mystery of Peter Quill’s true parentage.

And boy, does Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 not disappoint. It’s as funny and as charmingly hilarious at the first. Not only is it visually stunning with its use of colour, design, and straight up imagination lead by the ever brilliant writer/director James Gunn that smashes many of the other MCU films out of the park, it’s pure comedic fun set to a second awesome mix tape. Although the songs this time around are more somber and poetic, it fits the tone of the film a lot more with it’s serious subtext.

The story is simple but this allows more time for the characters with more of an emphasis on growth and family, which also proves that MCU films have more potential than what they’ve been showing in the all style, sass, and comedy and more often than not, lacking the heart that it truly needs and the villains that lack more then two dimensions.

And unlike that of many of the DC films, and more in particular Suicide Squad (even when they just have the three main characters of Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice), that struggle with a large cast, Guardians manages to exquisitely balance a large cast of eight or more characters. Each of them are given enough screen time to have a satisfactory arc of emotion and for us as an audience to connect with them. And I think that’s why the MCU works so well is that we have that ability to actually connect with the characters, no matter their supporting or leading roles, and thus making the experience more enjoyable and memorable (though this isn’t to say that the Avenger’s films had this quality – the pair helmed by overglorified writer/director Joss Whedon were nothing but two plus hours of witty one liners…we can only hope the Russo Brothers bring what they brought with Winter Soldier and Civil War to the two-part Infinity War).

Guardians of the Galaxy is an emotional dense, culturally diverse, and thrilling blast of a ride with some finally badass female characters too boot.

Film-O-Meter: 8/10.

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gravity falls meme: [1/10] episodes
Not What He Seems ≡ Oh, you poor kids. You really think your uncle’s innocent? I’ve seen it all before. False names, double lives. One minute, they’re playing with water balloons. The next, they’re building doomsday devices. Your uncle scammed the whole world. You gonna let him scam you too?

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Movie of the Day: 6/15/17
“A Clockwork Orange” (1971)
Director: Stanley Kubrick
I truly believe Stanley Kubrick as a director saw things that no one else could see, without his direction, this may well have been a complete disaster buried in the archives of 70’s duds. This adaptation of the novel of the same name follows a young man who is used as a governmental excitement to see if the youths sins can be washed away. Having not read the novel, I can tell you that I don’t care to read it because I already know I enjoy the film for its stunning visual quality. The film is dark, complex and at times a bit freighting but nevertheless you won’t take your eyes off it. A perfect social commentary on the youth of the time, “A Clockwork Orange” is a classic film from one of hollywoods greatest directors.

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THE SCENERY OF THE LEGEND OF KORRA

Book 1: Air - Chapter 3 “The Revelation” (Part 1)