and is not that they have a low esteem

I talked to my mom for like 2 hours yesterday about my anxiety and low esteem because she didn’t even know that was a thing but she noticed I wasn’t myself that day, so I just let it all out. And it was nice, because like now she knows what’s going on in my head and she said some stuff I really needed to hear. The biggest thing was about how it could really easily be taken care of if I did therapy. And I have been thinking about it for a while but always thought against it because it might not work or like, what I’m going through isn’t that big of a deal and therapy would be like overkill, and it can be expensive. But I was thinking about it and hopefully some really nice things are going to happen in the future, and so I need to take this time to get better about myself, and I really think all my problems would be solved if I was able to view myself how others viewed me. I wanna let myself like myself!

anonymous asked:

God I'm so glad someone finally addressed how Allura piloting Blue would affect Lance. His insecurities about his place on the team were brought to light last season and now this season suddenly someone else can just???? pilot his lion??? just because???? I love the idea of Allura as a pilot, but I mean, why couldn't she have taken the immediately available Red? Why did it necessarily have to be Blue? Why do the story writers hate Lance????

yeah no lance only suffers from low self esteem but taking his lion away from him to throw him into an unfamiliar lion, and being in keith’s shadow once again because he’s probably feeling like sloppy fucking seconds as a paladin, is just FINE NOW. im sure we’ll find out why, as someone pointed out allura might go for red first before going to blue. but literally this wouldn’t be happening if allura just… LEAD VOLTRON LIKE SHE DESERVES TO! and uh, hey, come here, come in close *whispers in your ear* you know why, my dude

warning-heckmouth  asked:

Does dating sim count as an au

It does now!

1. Beyond starting ill feelings, characters having low self esteem can also lead to much trickier routes, because Jesse is the leader of the Order of the Stone and the hero of countless worlds, and characters with low self esteem have a very hard time believing Jesse’s seriously interested in them, especially when it comes to Jesse’s friends with low self esteem, like Olivia. Similarly, several characters who start out with negative feelings towards Jesse, especially characters like Em and Aiden, are even harder because even when they like Jesse, they find it much harder to believe, due to their past actions, that Jesse’s interested back.

2. Outright bad endings are almost guaranteed if Jesse nearly completes a route only to turn down, or even mock, whoever it is at the last second, which is possible with all characters, even if the harshest option for a few of them is just to turn them down gently. Should Jesse do this, it’s possible for Jesse to skip any potential neutral endings and secure bad endings by mocking the character even more, by making it seem like Jesse was just toying with them, or by asking the other character if they seriously thought it would ever work out.

3. Certain items can greatly improve progress towards a good ending with various characters, but only if given at specific points/events. A number of characters will think Jesse is only mocking them unless they’re more involved with Jesse or have shared certain secrets.

4. No matter who they end up with or who they try to be in a relationship with, Jesse and Ivor will absolutely talk to each other at certain points about how insane, difficult, and bizarre dating can be, usually with some hints/nods towards secret endings for the other mode somewhere in the conversation.

5. Part of the reason Ivor is hard mode is because he flusters so easily, for better or worse, and several routes are directly affected by how he handles this and how well he does, or doesn’t, keep a calm head around whoever he’s trying to date while they’re trying to fluster him.

ladynorbert  asked:

Once you get this say five things you like about yourself, publicly. Send to ten of your favorite followers!

Thank you my dear @ladynorbert for thinking of me!

 I was debating to do this or not but decided that my low self esteem has been ruling the roost lately so a little smack upside its head wouldn’t hurt

1) I’m a caring person - mostly about animals and good people 

2) I’m kind/considerate - my natural default is to put the other persons needs first

3) I’m honest - I can’t lie for shit so just stick to the truth so long as its not too hurtful

4) I’m kinda smart - not super smart but a solid B student 

5) I’m hard working- I have worked since I was 16 and always worked hard, mainly because doing nothing is kinda boring

Phew… ><

(Three of those form part of my self esteem ‘mantra’ something a therapist taught me which has stuck as beating myself up with a stick is my go to move)

anonymous asked:

hey: you aren't insignificant. i know this doesn't sound like much, but you made my entire week with a blog compliment. i was feeling really awful at the time & when i clicked on activity and saw that, i literally started crying. i have such low self esteem that the fact that a stranger saw enough in me to write about was amazing. it's not forgettable. you do make a difference in people's lives, or at least mine. thank you.

oh my, I’m sorry you haven’t had a good week but I’m so happy that I made you smile, and please don’t cry but if you do cry rub the tears around on your face bc it moisturizes your face and we don’t want your beautiful face to not be moisturized you know? Take care love and watch some tv, eat icecream and cry bc sometimes a good cry is important :)

Things that don’t make a person any less beautiful for having:

- stretch marks
- acne
- skin conditions
- overbites
- scars
- body fat
- eye bags/dark circles
- mental illnesses
- disabilities
- low self esteem
- speech impediments
- trauma
- a different gender than the one they were assigned
- sex
- to take medication
- eating disorders

5

Pillar Week Day 4 - Childhood

A very young Wham tends to overthink himself. His asshole dads tend to undershare their enthusiasm. But once he grew aware of that, he became much, much stronger.

I’m late, sorry, I didn’t have a lot of time to work on this! I just want Kars and ACDC to be proud dads and Wham to know it :’)

best team skull grunts:

rah rah cool cats

  • grunts A and B ask you if you remember them, and if you say no they shrug and switch places to see if that helps, even though they look exactly the same
  • the one that tries to steal berries from an old man, gets called out, and tells him not to say that because his “self-esteem is already low”
  • the grunt squatting on a route that says he is in pain because squats are hard
  • grunts stealing the bus sign
  • the one female grunt who really loves carnvine but doesn’t have one on her team yet (someone get her a carnvine)
  • the rapping duo manning the po town pokecenter that are broke and probably spent too much time practicing that rap 
  • the guy passed out (drunk?) in said pokecenter next to a spinda
  • two miscommunicating male grunts: one is trying to send a signal about being invaded, the other, “does he think I’m hot or something?”
  • whichever grunt has that cute room decorated with plushies
  • the grunt sleeping across two beds
  • two fourth-wall-breaking female grunts arguing about their tank tops
  • the one that gets really confused when you sit on guzma’s chair
  • “wanna see me get hit with hyperbeam?” grunt who will do anything for money
  • the grunt that knows he will loose, so he just leaves without fighting you

a bizarre (yet not surprising when you think about it) consequence of white privilege is white murderers having fucking fangirls. even before the literal hell we have on this bad website that is columbiners and dylann roof groupies, white male serial killers like ted bundy and charles manson have had fangirls who wrote to them and overall treated them like they were rock stars and not convicted killers. they do this not just because they find the killers “interesting”, but because they hold similar negative views as the killer, or because the killer is the “bad boy” archetype and they think they as a woman can “change” the killer into a better person (which is also the result of low self esteem and severe internalized misogyny). it’s also a very interesting that while white killers get this attention, black and latino men (who are disproportionately imprisoned and executed) do not receive any attention like this. obviously i don’t think they should, but the fact that they don’t while white killers do speaks volumes about how pervasive the notion of white supremacy is in our culture

anonymous asked:

Can you explain why you think Jake Peralta has ADHD?

I’m actually really glad you asked because oooh boy, let met tell you, Jake Peralta, in my humble opinion as a fellow sufferer, is currently the single most obvious but sadly non confirmed (yet… one can still hope) fictional character with (most likely) undiagnosed ADHD out there. His strengths as well as his flaws all point towards him having the disorder.


So let me start with the good things:

- He’s a quick thinker! He thinks in unconventional ways with his mind taking leaps and turns whenever it feels like it. Often allowing him to solve cases in creative ways. … It also makes for interesting conversations most of the time.

- Using his impulsivity in a good way! When he figures something out, he’s usually the first one to get up AND DO SOMETHING. 

- Excitability! Have you seen how his eyes lights up when he feels like he’s doing what he thinks is right? He becomes like a little hyperactive child again. Usually, adults with the disorder, aren’t as much outwardly hyperactive anymore as children are. Instead, this tends to turn into feelings of restlessness and gets internalized. But of course, in a show like this, it makes sense to show him like this.

- Hyperfocus! Die Hard, anyone?! That guy has had the same hyperfixation for years!!! And I bet, he frequently uses his hyperfocus capability to get things done, too. That is, if he’s interested enough, of course.

- His energetic personality! Brings some energy and passion into the work place, don’t you think? And also it’s how many adults with ADHD are perceived if they feel well-integrated and at ease with their surroundings. Always the one coming up with new ideas? That’s us!

Now onto the not so good stuff when you’re the one struggling with it:

- Again, impulsivity. Saying the first thing that comes to your mind, talking… A Lot, acting without thinking and without regard for consequences. As seen on the show, it has not always been the best “decision” for him.

- Mood swings! Unfortunately, many are not aware of this fact but in many cases, ADHD actually comes with fast and frequent mood swings. The smallest things can trigger intense emotional responses. Jake definitely has that as he tends to jump from “Life is meaningless!” to “I’m the greatest!” without a problem. Just solved a case? I’M SO HAPPY!!! Oh no, they got away with it? Why bother anymore…… Yeah, that…

- You know the episodes where he and Captain Holt are undercover as part of the Witness Protection Program and Holt points out how Jake seems depressed lately? Yeah, people with ADHD can way too easily fall into this mindset (mood swings, anyone?). With the absence of regular work to keep his fast-pacing mind occupied, it’s not a surprise that he starts feeling this way.

- Not able to handle boredom! He has always something going. Games, ideas, looking for new cases. He never slows down and seems to keep himself occupied at all times. Classic ADHD!

- The way he handles words and numbers, anyone? How he never reads books? Oh, and then his troubles with finances? His locker and desk looking… like that? Classic signs of troubles with organisation and attention to me.

- Easily discouraged! It can’t be denied that he hasn’t had an easy childhood. Together with the troubles with his father, ADHD could be a way to explain why he now is the way he is. 

- Problems with low self-esteem (*cough* and definitely Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria)! Either he feels like THE BEST COP OUT THERE or he falls into this thinking pattern where you have trouble believing that people actually care about you. Probably something he should talk about in therapy, as he puts it himself.

Together with his tendency to procrastinate when it comes to boring stuff, his inability to express and cope with his feelings sometimes, his forgetfulness and not so ideal time management (for example, being late to work all the time),  I strongly believe that Jake Peralta has ADHD and should be written and confirmed as such (hey, it’s never too late!).
An episode focusing on him suspecting he has the condition and eventually seeing a specialist? I’d cry. Honestly.



Plus:
The fact that so many real people with the disorder relate to him??? Okay, that’s not actually relevant here but definitely something the writers should take into consideration. BUT, don’t feel bad if you don’t! Not everyone’s ADHD is the same! :)

Psst, you won’t believe how many times I sit there thinking “that’s so me!” while watching the episodes. There’s even more “evidence” sprinkled throughout the show. All the small details not listed aboved. It’s marvelous and oh-so-relatable.

And just imagine the many excited faces watching the show when a main character on a immensely popular show like this would be confirmed as being one of them! Just thinking of the tiny, tiny, TINY possibility puts me into happy stimming mode!!! It would also help increase awareness in those who may not know anything about it and help reduce prejudices ‘cause ding dong, ADHD is not a fake disorder and adults can have it, too. Surprise!

(P.S. Please also check out this awesome post!)

How to Break free of Addiction to Approval

1. Recognise that other people do not determine your worth and value. It’s your life not there’s. They are responsible to themselves for their life; and you are responsible to yourself for your life. Don’t give up your “self” to please someone else.

2. Also, people change, have different values and outlooks and want different things for, and from, us. It’s simply impossible to please everyone all of the time, or even most of the time.

3. Recognise that spending our lives trying to make others happiness is a recipe for failure and low self-esteem. It’s a pointless way to spend your life. It will stop you being happy and true to yourself.

4. Be kind to yourself. Understand that we all have weaknesses, and things that we regret saying and doing.

5. Also, we’re all on our journey – and the journey is harder and more challenging for some than others. Perhaps you are dealing with obstacles that other people have not had to face.

6. Develop your self esteem from within. Decide on the type of person YOU want to be, and work on being true to that.

7. Think about what really matters to you, and the different goals you’d like to achieve – then set these as a priority. That is, decide what YOU want to do instead of worrying about what others would like you to do.

8. Develop a plan for the direction of your life. Focus your thinking, energy, choices and decisions around living a life that is meaningful to you. At the end of each day, check to ensure you’ve done something that is taking you in that direction.

9. Work on developing your self-reliance – so that although it is nice to have help and support from others, you’re not dependent upon it (or them). Also, being able to think, act and choose for yourself will greatly increase your self-confidence.

10. Work on accepting, valuing and loving yourself. Appreciate the good things about YOU. Notice your successes, and any moves towards living out your goals, and becoming the real you.

11. Choose to live in the moment. Decide not to keep going over the past, or worrying too much about what lies ahead. Notice and relish what is good about “right now”.

12. Choose joy. Allowing yourself to experience joy is freeing, motivating, energising. It keeps your focus on the positives in life.

A little thing I’ve been thinking about lately: Dorian’s comment that Felix was “a better man, clearly; not nearly as handsome.” It’s interesting - so many narratives have this idea of a character thinking they’re plain or ugly and that being part of general low self-esteem, because it’s taken as a value judgement. (It seems to come up a lot more in narratives written by women, depressingly, but that’s a whole other meta.) It’s an easy shorthand for “this character has self-worth issues.”

Dorian’s character writing swerves that. He knows he’s handsome. It was something valued in Tevinter, both as part of the casual sex he alludes to and as a status thing in general - part of that “perfect body, perfect mind” idea; it’s certainly easier to get your perfectly-distilled mageling kid married off if they’re nice to look at. What he’s worried about is that there’s nothing of worth on the inside. Look at his touched surprise and the way he doesn’t know how to respond when he’s called “a better man then he gives himself credit for” or “brave” - those are what get him, not the more obvious, easy compliments. He jokes to the Inquisitor about being “but an adornment upon your arm” - and that’s exactly what worries him.

Other characters call him arrogant, and eh, maybe, but only about particular things. The obvious things he can take pride in, that his peers back in the Imperium were bothered about - his appearance, his magical prowess - then sure. That’s how he’s used to playing the Game. But he’s constantly trying to work out what he is without those and without Tevinter ideas of status, and trying to live up to his own ideals and principles the way his father and Alexius ultimately couldn’t (”What’s in your heart” indeed). He’s trying, constantly, to approach people without ulterior motives and game-playing - look at how he says he’s had few friends (with the clear implication he wishes it were otherwise), look at his banters with other companions and the way he tries to level with them, and look at his general hatred of deception and politics and… well, everything about the Winter Palace. 

He’s got everything to prove - and he says that in a barely veiled way when he talks about wanting to show that “not everything from Tevinter is terrible.” He’s constantly trying to prove to himself and everybody else that he’s moral, that he has integrity, that he’s worthy of love (platonic or otherwise - look how pleased he is and how hard he tries to impress, to endear himself, when he’s making friends with the Inquisitor, never mind when he’s romanced, because he’s been rejected so many times that he’s startled and disbelieving when it doesn’t happen). That’s because on some level, he’s worried about these things.

He may strut and show off - after all, “Pavus” means “peacock” - but arrogant? Not exactly, if you know what to look for.

An Analysis of Bakugou’s Superiority Complex

I think you’re at least kind of right. Bakugou knows Midoriya has something that he lacks, and that causes him to feel bitterness towards Midoriya. It’s also hard for Bakugou to deal with the idea that Midoriya is more like All Might than he is. Although, I don’t Bakugou ever admired Midoriya back when Midoriya was Quirkless. I think he hated Midoriya because Midoriya makes him feel weak.

I think Bakugou’s hatred of Midoriya comes from him having a textbook case of superiority complex.

A superiority complex is “a psychological defense mechanism in which feelings of superiority counter or conceal feelings of inferiority.” In other words, Bakugou’s narcissism and feelings of superiority are due to him trying to cover for his inferior feelings. When Bakugou is feeling weaker than Midoriya in some cases, he’ll lash out against Midoriya and treat him as inferior in order to protect his feelings of weakness. Whether Midoriya realizes it or not, he picks on Bakugou’s insecurities, and, in order to protect his ego, Bakugou bullies Midoriya and tries to make himself feel superior.

I don’t think Bakugou’s superiority complex has always existed. I think Midoriya simply triggered it.

From when he was a young child, Bakugou has always been praised.

As his mom points out, all that praise for his talents has made him narcissistic.

Bakugou’s feelings of superiority come from all the praises during his childhood. That much is self-explanatory. Because of those praises, he has high expectations for himself.

Because Bakugou was praised for his Quirk and Midoriya had no Quirk, it was easy for Bakugou to come to the conclusion that Midoriya is inferior.

As a result, when Midoriya, someone who’s supposed to be beneath him, tries to help him, it’s a huge blow to Bakugou’s ego. Midoriya is supposed to be a Quirkless loser. Bakugou isn’t supposed to need his help.

Any time Midoriya tries to help Bakugou, it makes Bakugou feel weak. In order to feel less weak and to prove his superiority, he bullies Midoriya and brings him down. A superiority complex exists to cover for an inferiority complex. In Bakugou’s case, his inferiority complex comes from Midoriya making him feel weak and like he has lower self-worth. His superiority complex kicks in when he bullies and brings Midoriya down in order to feel stronger. If Bakugou can keep convincing himself that Midoriya is weak and that he’s superior, then Bakugou can feel strong. The weaker Midoriya is, the stronger Bakugou feels. It’s a vicious mindset that Bakugou develops over the years, and he can’t get over this mindset and acknowledge Midoriya’s strength easily.

Bakugou’s superiority complex is so bad that he even considers losing if it means not having to work with Midoriya. Working with Midoriya is just that big of a bruise to his ego, and it makes him feel stronger thinking Midoriya is not good enough to work with him.

He still has to mentally think Midoriya is a piece of shit even while working with him.

Bakugou has gotten into this mindset where he has to prove he’s better than Midoriya in order to make himself stronger. Midoriya makes him feel weak. In order to combat those feelings, Bakugou has to put Midoriya down.

Midoriya getting a Quirk from All Might and catching up to Bakugou in terms of ability makes Bakugou feel weak. That’s why he can’t accept Midoriya’s strength so easily. Midoriya is supposed to always be beneath Bakugou. When he catches up to Bakugou, that only pisses Bakugou off because that’s not the way it’s supposed to be. It’s a failure on Bakugou’s part to allow Midoriya to catch up to him.

Once Bakugou realizes Midoriya received All Might’s power, he thinks that means there must be something Midoriya has that Bakugou doesn’t. Midoriya did something right while Bakugou did something wrong. Since All Might chose Midoriya, a kid who was always weaker than Bakugou, it makes Bakugou feel weak. This aggravates his inferiority complex. Bakugou feels so weak that he blames himself for getting captured by the villains and leading to All Might’s downfall.

It doesn’t help Bakugou’s inferiority complex when he feels like Midoriya is always looking down on him. He hates it when people do that.

Just a reminder, if people feel weak or incompetent and they let that consume themselves, then they have an inferior complex.

An inferior complex isn’t always conscious. In Bakugou’s case, it was initially subconscious and then became more conscious after All Might lost his powers. His inferiority complex is aggravated by anyone who makes him feel weak. Midoriya especially makes it worse. However, other people have aggravated Bakugou’s inferiority complex as well.  

If someone stands against Bakugou, Bakugou wants that person to give it his or her all. If that person doesn’t, to Bakugou, that person is looking down on him and making him feel weak.

Todoroki does just that during the Sport’s Festival.

Bakugou’s superiority complex isn’t the only defense mechanism for his inferiority complex. Often he just gets REALLY PISSED OFF against the people who make him feel weak. For instance, this is what he’s like after his fight with Todoroki.

Bakugou also shuns anyone who makes him feel weak, like Todoroki for example.

There are other smaller examples of other students picking on Bakugou’s inferiority complex. Midoriya and Todoroki are just the big examples.

Not everyone with a superiority complex is as destructive as Bakugou. In fact, out of all the students with an inferiority complex, Bakugou seems to cope with it the worst since he hurts others in the process.

Aoyama is a milder example someone with of a superiority complex. Remember, a superiority complex is simply a defense mechanism for an inferiority complex.

People, like Aoyama, who feel insecure about themselves and let that insecurity consume them have an inferiority complex.

To cope with the inferiority complex, they act more superior. Although, in Aoyama’s case, instead of tearing people down like Bakugou, he simply boasts himself, tries to get attention, and acts like he’s amazing.

Aoyama acts like he loves himself, and he loves the attention. There could be an argument to be made that Aoyama doesn’t have a superiority complex since he doesn’t bring others down in order to make himself feel superior. However, he boasts how amazing he is, gets dramatic, and seeks attention as a way to cope with his feelings of inferiority.

Right now, Bakugou and Aoyama are the only students I can think of who have developed a superiority complex from their inferiority complex.

There are certainly other students who have an inferiority complex. It’s inevitable given the nature of being a hero. Being a hero is very competitive. In order to be successful, students need to stand out from their peers, and their peers in turn will will use their weaknesses against them. Villains also take advantage of any weakness students may have. It makes sense for students to feel like they’re inadequate compared to the amazing talent of their peers or to feel like they’re not as strong as they should be.

Interestingly enough, it doesn’t really look like Midoriya has an inferiority complex. An inferiority complex occurs when people become too focused on their deficiencies and start to feel intense lower self-worth. Midoriya doesn’t have that. Midoriya has usually been pretty pragmatic about his weaknesses and doesn’t let them make him think he’s inadequate or worth less.

Bakugou’s bullying never caused Midoriya to give up or feel worth less. Midoriya has always thought Bakugou is amazing. As a result, Bakugou became a role model for Midoriya instead of someone who pushes him down.

Hearing that Togata could have been the successor for One for All and that Nighteye thinks Togata would make a better successor doesn’t make Midoriya think he is unworthy of One for All. Midoriya still thinks he’s worthy of One for All and will push himself to prove it.

Keep in mind, Midoriya not having an inferiority complex does not mean he isn’t sometimes humble or hard on himself. He’s not cocky. He will have moments where he doesn’t take credit for his achievements or is disappointed in himself. That’s part of human nature. 

Here, Midoriya is giving others credit for his achievements. 

When he says this, he’s not saying he doesn’t deserve to be where he is or that he’s not deserving of his Quirk. He’s simply giving people who have helped him throughout is life credit. He wants to be the number one hero for their sake as well as his own. That’s not an inferiority complex. 

During the moments Midoriya is hard on himself, it’s usually because it’s the rational conclusion, such as in the example shown below. 

All Might tells Midoriya that he can only use to five percent of his power. Midoriya reasonably thinks that doesn’t sound like a lot. Midoriya isn’t being unreasonably hard on himself or thinks he’s weak. He’s just coming to the rational conclusion based on what he knows. Midoriya knows he needs to work on controlling his Quirk without breaking his bones. Midoriya feeling like he has a lot to work on doesn’t mean he thinks he’s a lesser being or has low self-esteem. 

People having moments where they’re hard on themselves or think they can do better is normal. An inferiority complex is when those inferior feelings happen all the time whether subconsciously or not. Bakugou often feels weak, and this manifests into the angry and mean-spirited behavior we know. Bakugou always subconsciously or consciously thinks he’s weak. It’s a more general feeling rather than one that happens occasionally. Midoriya doesn’t always think he’s not good enough or not deserving. If he’s not good enough in a certain area, then he’ll come to the rational conclusion for that particular area. An inferiority complex is a general feeling of inferiority rather than the occasional moments of feeling inferior. It makes people feel like they’re worth less overall. It’s a neurotic condition, meaning people with an inferiority complex worry frequently about their inferiority, even when it’s irrational or not important. The negative attitudes at times are irrational. 

Take Momo’s inferiority complex for example. She is very sensitive to her shortcomings from the Sports Festival. She is very hard on herself for not living up to her high expectations. She even goes as far as saying she “hasn’t left behind any noteworthy results.” Even though Momo is a very rational thinker, this is a VERY harsh criticism on her part and has affected her attitude since then. 

Momo’s negative feelings about herself occur when she compares herself to Todoroki. She starts feeling not good enough and loses confidence in herself. An inferiority complex affects the general perception and behavior one has towards himself or herself. 

Her inferiority complex prevents her from speaking up about a plan because she thinks she’s not good enough to share her idea. 

She thinks so little of herself that she comes to the conclusion that if Todoroki’s plan didn’t work, then hers can’t work either. 

An inferiority complex affects the behavior of individuals. In Momo’s case, hers makes her more passive because she feels like she’s not good enough to voice her opinion. In Aoyama’s case, it makes him more self-centered in order to compensate for his inferior feelings. In Bakugou’s case, it makes him become a bully because bringing people down makes him feel more superior. 

Midoriya not having an inferior complex makes sense. Midoriya is supposed to be Bakugou’s foil. Bakugou’s weaknesses are supposed to be Midoriya’s strengths.

If both boys have an inferiority complex, then they don’t make that good of foils. While Bakugou has feelings of weakness that he lets consume him. Midoriya doesn’t let his flaws make him feel weak or insecure and tries to push himself to be number one anyway because he believes he’s worthy of being number one.

Keep in mind, not everyone with an inferiority complex lets it hold them back or has harmful ways to cope with the inferiority complex like Bakugou does. An inferiority complex is simply a constant feeling of being inadequate and not measuring up. Some people with an inferiority complex use it to improve the skills they think they lack. It can be a driving force to improve. Bakugou, in a way, has also used his inferiority complex to improve himself. Unfortunately, he also tries to handle his feelings of weakness by lashing out and bringing others down.

The worst way to cope with an inferiority complex is to develop a superiority complex from it. People with a superiority complex still have low self-esteem like others with an inferiority complex. However, they also bring down others in order to cope with their low self-esteem and end up being isolated from people as a result.

What is executive dysfunction?
  • Executive functions are things like making plans, following through on plans, controlling impulsive actions, internalized self-talk, changing activities, and, yes, paying attention or focusing on the things we need or want to attend to. There are others, but these are the ones I know the most about and they seem to be the ones that plague us the most.
  • Making Plans. You get up in the morning and you have to decide what you’re going to do that day. Whatever list of activities you choose, that’s making a plan. Here’s another one: you need to clean up your room, so you stand in the doorway and decide what to do first. That’s making a plan.

    Executive dysfunction (ADHD) makes this really hard for a lot of people. Because we tend to see the whole picture better than the little parts, tasks like “clean your room” can be overwhelming. We need it broken down into smaller steps, like “put the clean clothes away and the dirty clothes in the hamper, then put the books on the bookcase.” For some people, even that is too much at a time. They need it broken down to “pick up the first piece of clothing you see and figure out if it’s clean or dirty; if it’s clean, put it in the correct drawer of your dresser or hang it up in the closet, and if it’s dirty, put it in your hamper.”

    Difficulty with this kind of thing can cause a lot of anxiety, and it’s why we tend to freeze up when faced with large, complicated jobs. We simply don’t know where to start, because making a plan is not something we are good at.
  • Following through on plans. Once you have a plan, you start at the first thing and you work your way down the steps until you’ve completed them all, right? Right. Well, executive dysfunction makes it really hard to do this.

    Part of it can be overwhelm: we look at the list of steps, see how long it is (big-picture thinking), and conclude that it’s impossible so we can’t do it. Other times we might not think we can do any of it right, or we might not know how to complete the step we’re on. Or we get distracted, or hung up on one of the steps (a lot of us are perfectionists).
  • Controlling impulsive actions. Most people are able to keep from saying every little thing that pops into their heads. They don’t buy things just because they like them without thinking about whether or not they’re too expensive or something. They control how they react to their emotions and save angry outbursts for whatever they think is an appropriate time and place.

    Executive dysfunction makes this really hard.

    ADHDers don’t have much of a “filter” unless it’s been drilled into us through behavioural conditioning (usually done by society in response to the stuff we say or do). So we think something and we say it, even if it’s hurtful. We buy stuff we like and then can’t pay our bills but hey we have a hot tub! We act out in anger and then wonder why people are afraid of us or mad at us five minutes later, because once we’ve raged we’re good and not mad anymore. As a general rule, we always intend to do the right thing… it’s just not always possible because our brains like to follow every impulse they have.
  • Internalized self-talk. Everyone has what’s known as “self-talk.” For people with low self-esteem, this is pretty negative. But it’s not just about what we tell ourselves about ourselves. It’s also how we get through situations (“Five more situps and we’re done for the day!”) and work through problems (“Next time Jimmy says that I’m going to tell him to go jump in a lake!”). By about age seven or eight (I forget exactly when; it could be older but I’m pretty sure it’s sometime in elementary shcool), most people are really good at keeping all of this silent and in their heads.

    Not so for those of us with ADHD. Executive dysfunction means that we don’t internalize our self-talk until much later, assuming we ever do. I still talk to myself out loud most of the time, though I do internalize a lot (especially in public).
  • Changing activities. You know the law of physics that says that an object that is at rest will remain at rest until acted upon by an external force, and that an object that is traveling in a particular direction at a particular speed will not change direction or speed unless acted upon by an external force? That’s called inertia, and that’s basically what we’re talking about here. (This is like the one thing about physics that I find truly useful in my everyday life. Kinda sad.)

    Basically, once we’re engaged in an activity, we’re in it until something happens to get us to move on. That’s why alarms work for some people - they jolt them out of their current activity and trigger them to move on to the next thing. (Of course, an ability to ignore alarms is also part and parcel of inertia. Yay!)
  • Paying attention or focusing on the things we need or want to attend to. So, the whole “attention deficit” part of “ADHD” is pretty ludicrous, because it’s not really a deficit of attention that we’re dealing with; it’s more an inability to control what we pay attention to. So we can hyperfocus (focus exclusively on one thing for hours on end) or we can jump around from one thing to another, and we don’t really have a lot of control over that. I’m sure you can see how all of the other aspects of executive dysfunction contribute to our lack of control over our attention.
Ceres in the Houses: The Extremes of Life

Besides showing how we nurture and want to be nurtured, Ceres also deals with our highs and lows- the brilliant highs and dizzy joys of the times we have what we want, and the darker days when we completely lose our faith. 

Wherever Ceres is placed [click here to find], that’s where you face the most intense issues, and experience the most intense happiness. The highs and lows come in a cyclical way:

Ceres in the First House
Your personal appearance, your reputation, your persona, your profile
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Enormous self-confidence about one’s unique personality
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Severe identity crises 

Ceres in the Second House
Your money, your talents, your possessions, your self-esteem
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Being capable of getting anything
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Suddenly realizing nothing that was gained matters after all

Ceres in the Third House
Your words and ideas, your life on the internet, your speech, writing
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Being heard and respected for one’s mental capacities
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Having one’s ideas completely rejected, ignored or ridiculed 

Ceres in the Fourth House
Your family, your hometown or country, your home, your roots
- Typical manifestation of the highs: An incredible sense of belonging
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Trying so hard to fit in but not being able to

Ceres in the Fifth House
Your children, your lovers, your art, your leisure time
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Feeling as if one’s creativity is at its peak and anything can be done
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Feeling devoid of any artistic skills at all, feeling empty and not being able to tap into one’s imagination

Ceres in the Sixth House
Your body, your working life, your housework, your duty and service
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Being incredibly productive and efficient, full of energy
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Not being able to get anything done, feeling ill and stressed out without concrete reasons

Ceres in the Seventh House
Your former, current or potential partners, your enemies or rivals, justice
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Being able to understand others completely, having others trust you fully
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Feeling isolated and left alone, being ostracized, having the hunch that someone’s planning something against you

Ceres in the Eighth House
Your financial or property agreements, secrets, sexual relationships
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Having all your bills taken care of, being trusted enough to to manage other people’s resources
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Having to borrow money but not being able to pay it back

Ceres in the Ninth House
Your travel, foreign, educational or publishing agenda
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Achieving a state of full understanding of the concepts you were studying/investigating/contemplating
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Being stuck in a series of sticky situations & not being able to do anything to escape

Ceres in the Tenth House
Your career, your reputation, social status
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Getting a promotion, being publicly congratulated/praised for having done such a great job 

Ceres in the Eleventh House
Your friends, your groups, clubs, teams, societies or committees
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Being able to contribute greatly to the causes you’ve been supporting
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Being denied a saying in what happens in your group/association, being expelled from it 

Ceres in the Twelfth House
Your secrets, your unconscious mind, psychology, the psychic world
- Typical manifestation of the highs: Understanding the self completely, interpreting your dreams, tapping into the unconscious
- Typical manifestation of the lows: Feeling divided, feeling lost/broken and as if one’s identity has been shattered

-crystal melbourne | within the zodiac | “where’s my Ceres?”