and if you can give me a download that is of higher quality than this

Comic Book Page Technical Specifications

This is a post for comic book artists preparing their pages for their publisher or colourist. I’m aware that many pros still don’t know some of this stuff, often because the bigger publishers have production teams who will take the incorrectly sized or shaped pages and adjust them before passing on to colourists or for print. However, this a) is giving more work to people that you can easily do yourself and b) reduces the amount of control you have over how your work is printed. It makes sense to provide files that will present your work in the best way possible.

So, the basics of a digital page file:

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

I have a horrible sleep pattern (I always go to bed past 1 am and I feel dead every weekday) and idk how to stop it. I'm usually up doing homework, but on weekends I just cat sleep and end up on my phone. Basically my time management sucks. How do I fix these problems??

Hellooo! Ahh, this has been me after the holidays. For your homework, try setting time limits. It probably isn’t ideal for you anyway to be doing homework right up until bed. It’s best to have time to relax before you sleep. When I was in high school and the demand to have finished tasks daily was a lot higher, I would get up early rather than staying up late. I would finish at an easy point I could go back to and then get up at maybe 5 or 5:30am. I personally preferred to sleep earlier and wake up earlier than sleep super late. I felt I wasn’t as tired in the mornings. With your phone, perhaps trying to turn it off or leave it away from your bed. Check it for 10 minutes or something before you go to sleep but limit your time. In reality, the more you use it before you sleep the more awake you are. 

When I was writing for The Academic Zine, I did an article about sleep hygiene and some tip on getting yours on track. I’ll copy and paste it below so you can have a read! 

1. Plan your ideal sleep routine. The first step to improving your sleep hygiene is to make a plan. While a few early nights can get you started, fixing your sleep hygiene will not be instantaneous. If your internal body clock is out-of-sync such that you only feel tired at midnight, getting sleep is bound to be a tough process. We suggest making small and manageable goals.

Start by setting a goal, such as getting ready for bed half an hour earlier or reading a book instead of checking your Tumblr. Make adjusting your sleep pattern more enticing by tracking and monitoring it. Downloadable phone applications help gamify your attempts to improve your sleep patterns, giving you more motivation. They offer information including your movements during the night, how your day affected your sleep, and the progress you’ve made. If you don’t want to use your phone while you sleep, make a habit tracker. We all know the pleasure of crossing off another day of the month that you managed to stick to a new habit.

2. Turn your room into a sleep sanctuary. In order to sleep comfortably, it is important to make your bedroom a calming environment.  Avoid studying in your bedroom or at least on the bed. Constantly using the bed for studying will weaken your brain’s association between being in bed and sleeping and instead associate it with working. Make the effort to use a desk or another room for studying so when your eyelids are drooping, you can go to your room, remove yourself from any stresses you’ve had, and take time to relax and recharge.

Get your sanctuary started by adjusting the light, temperature, and noise level. Use curtains or black-out blinds to make the room completely dark. If there is unavoidable light, you can try using a sleep mask. As the seasons change, it is natural to kick off the sheets or wrap up extra snuggly. However, if waking up because of temperature is a regular occurrence, take that as a sign to make a change. Try adding or removing a blanket, change your type of pajamas, and/or place a heater in the room on a low heat setting.

3. Prepare for the next day. As a student, I know how it feels to be tossing and turning because you’re worried about the next day. The easiest way to calm a racing mind is by preparing for the day ahead before going to bed. Small ways to prepare include organizing your bag, charging your phone, laptop, or tablet, and updating your planner or bullet journal. 

4. Take time to relax before bed. After a stressful day or long study session, getting into a relaxed and calm mood is the best way to prepare your mind for sleeping. Taking the time to destress can help to reduce the feeling of anxiety by detaching your mind from the events of the day. You can try reading, journaling, drawing, doing yoga, or taking a warm shower. Make it a habit to put a relaxing activity at the end of your to-do list so you can finish the day on a positive note. Finding an activity that helps focus your attention, calm your mind, and that you enjoy can be perfect for a bedtime routine.

5. Things to avoid. Right before your head hits the pillow, it is best to avoid things like using your computer or phone for extended periods of time and consuming any substances like caffeine or alcohol. While it is always tempting to watch just one more episode of your favorite show before going to bed, the screen can make you feel more awake. The time gap between exposure to light and your bedtime impacts the melatonin in your body, which is the chemical that signals drowsiness and makes you feel tired.

6. Exercise during the day. Exercise is not only good for your mental and physical health but also your sleep quality. Studies have shown that people who exercise the recommended amount per week had significantly higher quality of sleep, felt more energized during the day, and had improved concentration when they did feel tired. Make the effort to have at least 150 minutes of exercise during the week. Try taking a walk, going to the gym, or joining an exercise class. It is best to finish any strenuous physical activity a few hours prior to going to bed. If you exercise before sleeping, any energy you didn’t direct towards the workout will keep you feeling alert rather than sleepy. Light activity such as yoga or mediation is recommended as a late night workout.

7. The art of napping. Napping was one of the best parts of childhood, right? Now it seems when you accidentally fall asleep you feel worse than you did before. That’s because you’re either not napping for long enough or waking up during the deepest part of the sleeping cycle. How much is the right amount?

  • 1- 5 minutes (micro naps): great for having a small boost of energy and stopping that sleepy feeling.
  • 10-20 minutes (power naps): enhances alertness and concentration, elevates mood, and sharpens motor skills. Coffee takes 20 to 30 minute to take effect so if you want to boost alertness, have a cup before napping.
  • 45 minutes: helps to boost energy, creative thinking and boosts sensory processing.  Try setting an alarm to avoid the feeling of sleep inertia, grogginess, and disorientation which comes with the next phase of sleep.
  • 90 minutes: clear your mind, improve memory recall, and recoup lost sleep. By waking up after 90 minutes you’ll avoid the feeling of sleep inertia as you wake up from REM sleep.

8. Hack your sleep. Technology can make your sleep pattern more enticing by tracking your progress. Numerous apps available from the App Store or Play Store offer ways to see how your body responds through each phase of the sleep cycle. Try Sleep Cycle, Sleep Genius, or SleepBot. If you own a FitBit, try wearing it to bed. The app can set sleep goals, set an alarm, and track your sleep quality. Sleep calculators are also available (e.g. http://sleepyti.me) and allow you to nap without worrying about feeling groggy afterwards.

9. Avoid making a habit of all nighters. It is best to limit the number of times you are staying up all night even if it seems the only way to meet a deadline. Try using different time management methods – such as the Pomodoro technique – to avoid staying up all night. Making a habit of all night working sessions can, over time, decrease your concentration and result in poorer long term memory. If sacrificing sleep is the only way to meet a deadline, it is best to do it right. Try these tips:

  • top up your energy – take a nap, stretch a little, or drink a coffee.
  • eat protein – when you’re working hard, your body needs something to burn. Despite the tastiness of carbs, they store energy for later and can make you sleepier in the long term. Try including meat in your evening meal, or snacking on nuts and seeds.
  • move around – make an effort to take a break every now and then. Get up, stretch, move around, and reinvigorate yourself with energy.
  • music – keep yourself alert with some tunes. Instrumental songs or movie soundtracks often promote productivity and focus. If you’re feeling sleepy, put on your favorite song and have a silent sing along to get you back in the mood!
  • remove all distractions – if you’re texting a friend, watching a TV show, or checking your Facebook whilst attempting to finish a task, you’re wasting time. Having 20 minutes of concentration, followed by a 5-minute break, will be more effective than pausing every few minutes to reply to a message. If you use the Pomodoro technique, you can utilize your breaks to do this.
  • focus on one thing at a time – keep your concentration there until it’s done or it’s time to take a break. Multitasking when it is late will reduce your attentiveness to one task and could therefore reduce the quality of your work.
  • work at a desk – as aforementioned, avoid making a habit of using your bed for work. All-nighters are probably most comfortable in bed but after continuous use you’ll feel instantly more sleepy and unproductive as your brain is associating your bed with sleeping and relaxing. If you have a desk you can use during a late night work session, be sure to use it.
  • reward yourself the next day – after pulling an all nighter you need to recentralize your internal body clock. If you’re feeling tired, make an effort to go to sleep slightly earlier. Try taking a few hours to relax and do something you enjoy.

10. Stop mourning your mornings. Not everyone is a morning person, especially if you’re waking up super early. Setting a motivational routine can improve your morning mood. Set an alarm that doesn’t interrupt your sleep cycle. Sleep Cycle, as mentioned previously, wakes you up when your body is most alert which means the feeling of sleep inertia is reduced. When you get up, take two minutes to stretch. Allowing your body to stretch out after a long night sleep helps to rejuvenate our ligaments and release any tension in our joints. Washing your face with cold water or taking a shower help to make you fresh awake and fresh. Whether you eat straight away or get ready, make an effort to maintain your routine.

I hope this helps! :-) xx

anonymous asked:

Hey Emma! Not sure if this is study related but I'm in uni and have a really tough time getting to bed early - I find all ways to procrastinate going to bed until its 2 or 3 am and its ruining my life and ability to study! Any advice?

Hellooo! This is me too haha! I’m obsessed with the Most Popular Girls in School on YouTube and I end up watching episode after episode :’-)

When I was writing for The Academic Zine, I did an article about sleep hygiene and some tip on getting yours on track. I’ll copy and paste it below so you can have a read!

1. Plan your ideal sleep routine. The first step to improving your sleep hygiene is to make a plan. While a few early nights can get you started, fixing your sleep hygiene will not be instantaneous. If your internal body clock is out-of-sync such that you only feel tired at midnight, getting sleep is bound to be a tough process. We suggest making small and manageable goals.

Start by setting a goal, such as getting ready for bed half an hour earlier or reading a book instead of checking your Tumblr. Make adjusting your sleep pattern more enticing by tracking and monitoring it. Downloadable phone applications help gamify your attempts to improve your sleep patterns, giving you more motivation. They offer information including your movements during the night, how your day affected your sleep, and the progress you’ve made. If you don’t want to use your phone while you sleep, make a habit tracker. We all know the pleasure of crossing off another day of the month that you managed to stick to a new habit.

2. Turn your room into a sleep sanctuary. In order to sleep comfortably, it is important to make your bedroom a calming environment.  Avoid studying in your bedroom or at least on the bed. Constantly using the bed for studying will weaken your brain’s association between being in bed and sleeping and instead associate it with working. Make the effort to use a desk or another room for studying so when your eyelids are drooping, you can go to your room, remove yourself from any stresses you’ve had, and take time to relax and recharge.

Get your sanctuary started by adjusting the light, temperature, and noise level. Use curtains or black-out blinds to make the room completely dark. If there is unavoidable light, you can try using a sleep mask. As the seasons change, it is natural to kick off the sheets or wrap up extra snuggly. However, if waking up because of temperature is a regular occurrence, take that as a sign to make a change. Try adding or removing a blanket, change your type of pajamas, and/or place a heater in the room on a low heat setting.

3. Prepare for the next day. As a student, I know how it feels to be tossing and turning because you’re worried about the next day. The easiest way to calm a racing mind is by preparing for the day ahead before going to bed. Small ways to prepare include organizing your bag, charging your phone, laptop, or tablet, and updating your planner or bullet journal.

4. Take time to relax before bed. After a stressful day or long study session, getting into a relaxed and calm mood is the best way to prepare your mind for sleeping. Taking the time to destress can help to reduce the feeling of anxiety by detaching your mind from the events of the day. You can try reading, journaling, drawing, doing yoga, or taking a warm shower. Make it a habit to put a relaxing activity at the end of your to-do list so you can finish the day on a positive note. Finding an activity that helps focus your attention, calm your mind, and that you enjoy can be perfect for a bedtime routine.

5. Things to avoid. Right before your head hits the pillow, it is best to avoid things like using your computer or phone for extended periods of time and consuming any substances like caffeine or alcohol. While it is always tempting to watch just one more episode of your favorite show before going to bed, the screen can make you feel more awake. The time gap between exposure to light and your bedtime impacts the melatonin in your body, which is the chemical that signals drowsiness and makes you feel tired.

6. Exercise during the day. Exercise is not only good for your mental and physical health but also your sleep quality. Studies have shown that people who exercise the recommended amount per week had significantly higher quality of sleep, felt more energized during the day, and had improved concentration when they did feel tired. Make the effort to have at least 150 minutes of exercise during the week. Try taking a walk, going to the gym, or joining an exercise class. It is best to finish any strenuous physical activity a few hours prior to going to bed. If you exercise before sleeping, any energy you didn’t direct towards the workout will keep you feeling alert rather than sleepy. Light activity such as yoga or mediation is recommended as a late night workout.

7. The art of napping. Napping was one of the best parts of childhood, right? Now it seems when you accidentally fall asleep you feel worse than you did before. That’s because you’re either not napping for long enough or waking up during the deepest part of the sleeping cycle. How much is the right amount?

  • 1- 5 minutes (micro naps): great for having a small boost of energy and stopping that sleepy feeling.
  • 10-20 minutes (power naps): enhances alertness and concentration, elevates mood, and sharpens motor skills. Coffee takes 20 to 30 minute to take effect so if you want to boost alertness, have a cup before napping.
  • 45 minutes: helps to boost energy, creative thinking and boosts sensory processing.  Try setting an alarm to avoid the feeling of sleep inertia, grogginess, and disorientation which comes with the next phase of sleep.
  • 90 minutes: clear your mind, improve memory recall, and recoup lost sleep. By waking up after 90 minutes you’ll avoid the feeling of sleep inertia as you wake up from REM sleep.

8. Hack your sleep. Technology can make your sleep pattern more enticing by tracking your progress. Numerous apps available from the App Store or Play Store offer ways to see how your body responds through each phase of the sleep cycle. Try Sleep Cycle, Sleep Genius, or SleepBot. If you own a FitBit, try wearing it to bed. The app can set sleep goals, set an alarm, and track your sleep quality. Sleep calculators are also available (e.g. http://sleepyti.me) and allow you to nap without worrying about feeling groggy afterwards.

9. Avoid making a habit of all nighters. It is best to limit the number of times you are staying up all night even if it seems the only way to meet a deadline. Try using different time management methods – such as the Pomodoro technique – to avoid staying up all night. Making a habit of all night working sessions can, over time, decrease your concentration and result in poorer long term memory. If sacrificing sleep is the only way to meet a deadline, it is best to do it right. Try these tips:

  • top up your energy – take a nap, stretch a little, or drink a coffee.
  • eat protein – when you’re working hard, your body needs something to burn. Despite the tastiness of carbs, they store energy for later and can make you sleepier in the long term. Try including meat in your evening meal, or snacking on nuts and seeds.
  • move around – make an effort to take a break every now and then. Get up, stretch, move around, and reinvigorate yourself with energy.
  • music – keep yourself alert with some tunes. Instrumental songs or movie soundtracks often promote productivity and focus. If you’re feeling sleepy, put on your favorite song and have a silent sing along to get you back in the mood!
  • remove all distractions – if you’re texting a friend, watching a TV show, or checking your Facebook whilst attempting to finish a task, you’re wasting time. Having 20 minutes of concentration, followed by a 5-minute break, will be more effective than pausing every few minutes to reply to a message. If you use the Pomodoro technique, you can utilize your breaks to do this.
  • focus on one thing at a time – keep your concentration there until it’s done or it’s time to take a break. Multitasking when it is late will reduce your attentiveness to one task and could therefore reduce the quality of your work.
  • work at a desk – as aforementioned, avoid making a habit of using your bed for work. All-nighters are probably most comfortable in bed but after continuous use you’ll feel instantly more sleepy and unproductive as your brain is associating your bed with sleeping and relaxing. If you have a desk you can use during a late night work session, be sure to use it.
  • reward yourself the next day – after pulling an all nighter you need to recentralize your internal body clock. If you’re feeling tired, make an effort to go to sleep slightly earlier. Try taking a few hours to relax and do something you enjoy.

10. Stop mourning your mornings. Not everyone is a morning person, especially if you’re waking up super early. Setting a motivational routine can improve your morning mood. Set an alarm that doesn’t interrupt your sleep cycle. Sleep Cycle, as mentioned previously, wakes you up when your body is most alert which means the feeling of sleep inertia is reduced. When you get up, take two minutes to stretch. Allowing your body to stretch out after a long night sleep helps to rejuvenate our ligaments and release any tension in our joints. Washing your face with cold water or taking a shower help to make you fresh awake and fresh. Whether you eat straight away or get ready, make an effort to maintain your routine.

I hope this helps! :-) xx

anonymous asked:

Please share your tips to enhance the quality of our lives! Like making the bed. I'd love to hear them 💕

Hi love! Okay so here are some little tips I’ve picked up over the past few months that definitely impact your quality of living. I tried to explain each the best I could, so this post is going to be long. But these are simple things that you can be in control of that make a difference!

1. Make your bed. As soon as I wake up and start my day, I make my bed. And if not as soon as possible, ALWAYS before I leave the house. It’s a way of solidifying your day in a positive manner, and when you come home either in between tasks or at the end of your day, you feel invited into your space, not like you’re crashing into your own room.

2. Learn how to clean your room. I say learn because none of us really learn or know how. I read The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo a month or two ago and it was life changing (use your amazon account and download the audio book for free with Audible as your first audio book). She explains that 1. Western culture naturally breeds hoarders and material lovers  2. We know how to make things “look” clean, but allow our spaces to be filled with things we don’t need or value 3. Modern style and pinterest blogs have really put an emphasis on storage. Why the hell do we need so much storage? Storage should be an afterthought. Get rid of everything you don’t need and you won’t have much to store. This woman honestly changed my life.

3. Get to sleep at a normal time. You can not function optimally if you’re only running on 5 hours of sleep a night!

4. How can you make your space feel more like you? I got an aromatherapy diffuser for about $20 and it’s been magical, I find that I particularly like lavender oil and it’s been blissful to have oils on when I wake up and have them soothe me to sleep

5. Your bed is for sleeping – that’s it. This is a callout post lol. I grew up in a hoarder family where no space was used for its designated purpose and as a family we became very pack-rat-y and were (still are, with the exception of me) a very mole in a hole type family. That included eating, where by at least age 10 I was eating alone in my bed. It’s a hard habit to kick, but eating in your bed is not only unsanitary, it’s not the best for your piece of mind. I stopped doing so, and I don’t do any more work (for the most part) at my bed either, which I’ll discuss below. My bed feels like a much more special and soft place now that I have trained my brain to associate it with pure relaxation and no other tasks.

6. Invest in a desk and chair – I’m not talking about anything fancy. It could literally be a used desk, end, or foldaway table for under $50 and a cheap foldaway chair. If you live in the US, apps by LetGo and Offer Up let people sell their used items like furniture for cheap. Honor yourself by designating a space for yourself for work and eating (I also find it’s much better for your posture as well). Mentally again it’s nice because all of my school troubles metaphorically stay at my desk, I don’t carry them into my bed. And if you have a super tiny room like I do, utilize as much space as possible and maybe try a corner desk/table.

7. Allow yourself silence. What ways do you try to fill voids? Do you always watch tv while you eat? Do you need to have a 100 different things happening at once to feel satisfied? It’s nice to eat quietly and actually think about what you’re doing. I watched a segment where Thich Nhat Hahn discussed this, and being mindful in this way with eating and all tasks. What about when you study, or drive, etc? Something to think about. Be mindful of the content you engage in on social media and entertainment as well. Sometimes something can be entertaining but toxic to your mental/emotional health!

8. Invest in a daily practice of something you enjoy, even if it’s 10 minutes a day – (I do not include forcing yourself to exercise in this list- if you do not enjoy it or are doing it for the wrong reasons/reasons that do not bring you comfort, it is not mindful) I do yoga and not only has it stopped me from throwing myself off a bridge, but it really has made me consider who I am and what I want and need. I slowly breathe and form whatever shapes I need to connect to my higher self. Maybe for you, your thing could be painting, swimming, writing, reading, whatever. Give yourself the time everyday to explore yourself through whatever medium possible.

9. Be mindful of what you put in your body – I’m itching to make a separate post about this but honestly even more now than ever I’ve realized how receptive our bodies are, and we don’t actually listen to our bodies, but our egos and things we’ve heard. It takes a lot of untraining, but it’s something to think about and I feel my best when I eat as naturally as possible.

10. Think before you speak – Give yourself time, even if it’s mid-statement, to form your thoughts before you speak. You deserve that much.

11. Treat your body – When you have the time, why not give your body some extra lotion, try a body scrub in the shower, dry brush, etc? Put on a robe, relaxed to your favorite music?

12. Scrape your tongue - If you’ve never used a tongue scraper before, look it up and add it to your daily oral hygiene routine. They’re cheap. They are also a big part of Ayurveda and it is believed that scraping your tongue daily (I do it in the morning and night) removes toxins and messes, aids in digestion, and also allows you to taste more clearly as well as be aware of problems in your body.

13.  Sunshine and nature – My last tip. I read an interview by a model I like, and she mentioned getting at least 30 minutes of sunshine a day to keep herself going. My therapist has recommended sinking my feet into the grass as often as possible to ground myself. Of course we can be realistic here – if you live anywhere that winters are brutal, sitting out in the sun isn’t an option year round. Maybe you live in a city where you can’t sink your feet into the grass. But whatever it is, be mindful of your surroundings when you’re outside. Stop moving and breathe.We move so fast that we don’t notice little details around us. Interestingly since doing so, I find all sorts of little unique creatures in nature pop up when I’m outside that never did before and it’s quite fun!


Hope some of these resonated with you, much love x (and if anyone wants me to elaborate on any of these topics or add more to this, please let me know!)

Let’s Talk.

So today I saw this post by @edens-star. And if you haven’t read it yet, please do. I wanted to reblog it but I didn’t want to make this post any longer than it’s going to be already. When I read her post, it really struck a chord with me. Not many people besides my friends know about the struggles I had lately and I think that now that I’m finally happy with my blog, it’s important to shed light on those things. 

Even if you don’t read past this line, just please know that you aren’t the only person that falls into a rut or a hard place with your art, story, blog, etc. And there are so many people around you, including myself, that are here for you. Anyone can come to me about anything, even if I haven’t met you yet. Just remember that.

Now about my journey, I’ve been making CC and running a simblr for almost two years now and man have I seen my content grow and evolve. I myself, had not. Two years later I was still my own worst critic. And honestly, it made me dislike what I do. Making content was one of the things I enjoyed most but becasue of my mentality, it became more of a chore. I like doing it because it’s a great creative outlet, but more often then not, I’d quit my projects or fall into a rut and take ages to finish them. And I couldn’t really figure out why. Until I took a much needed break. I think it was about two months ago, I took a break from creating, even downloading CC and made a new blog. It was so refreshing just starting over. And even though I only have a fraction of my old followers, I’m MUCH happier. And this break even made me realize how good Sims 4 actually looks. I still have a lot of alpha stuff in my game but I find myself almost never using it and finding a whole new appreciation for maxis match content.

I’m a perfectionist. My own worst critic. That’s just who I am. But what you might not know is that I show every single thing that I touch to my friends. They are my judge and jury. They give great input and inspiration when I need it. They also help motivate me to keep doing what I do. And I often show them a thing I am dissatisfied with and almost 95% of the time, the thing I dislike either doesn’t bother them or they just don’t care about the small imperfections that bother me so much. I feel like if the things I make aren’t perfectly perfect then the time and care I pour into them won’t be recognized. But that’s not true. Even if others don’t see it, me and my friends do and they are so proud of me for it. They tell me all the time how much they love the things I make and how much time and effort I put into them and I could never thank them enough for what they do for me. 

I’m so much happier with my content and myself now. I don’t bog myself down with impossible standards or giant projects. If there’s something wrong with something I’m working on, I used to get mad and just stop working on stuff altogether. But that isn’t productive. Now, I just save it and work on something easier and go back to it later while I still have inspiration. I used to upload on a schedule of “when I get it done” but because it took me so long to finish things, it would take ages for me to actually upload them. But now, I use Mondays to work on CC. I’ll knock out a few projects and finish them up to upload when I feel ready. I almost have enough stuff waiting to be uploaded that I could upload twice a week if I wanted for a little while but still have enough content backlogged where I wouldn’t feel pressured to work on stuff if I didn’t feel like it. Some aspects of CC making that I used to avoid are now my favorite parts. Like previews for example, but I’ve found a way to make it less of a pain. Before, I’d hate having to load up my game just to try out one piece of CC, but now I wait until I’ve done a chunk of stuff and test/do previews all at the same time. 

The other thing I struggled with was my style. I felt like I didn’t have one. Every preview I made was different because I couldn’t settle on a style. So I took a step back and simplified things. I’ve simplified the way I take previews. And how I edit them. They’re less cluttered and look much smoother to me now. I just go about doing things differently now and it’s all for the better. I now put out higher quality CC, with better previews, less heartache and less time, and there’s absolutely no change in the time and effort I put into things. This time around I think it shows even more. I’ve learned to finally appreciate myself and my work. I don’t drive myself crazy over tiny little details and I don’t neglect my followers with dry spells. I feel like I have a style I can stick to now. I love the way my previews look. And I feel like with time, someone will be able to look at them and go “That’s one of faerieflower’s previews” and that makes me so happy. I finally found my identity here I think. Or I’m getting there at least. 

If you take anything away from this let it be this:

  • Take breaks. Even if you don’t think you need one. Time can shed so much light on things and give you a new perspective.
  • Don’t be scared to try new things. You don’t know unless you try.
  • Don’t push yourself. Inspiration is a fickle thing, if you force it, it leaves you.
  • Go where your inspiration takes you. And run it dry. Keep creating while you’re in the mood but don’t neglect yourself and take breaks when you feel like you need one. 
  • And most importantly, don’t be so hard on yourself. You’re more likely to give up or ruin something you’re working on than anything else. Don’t let yourself do it. Take a step back and get input from others or look at it from a way that isn’t your own. If you’re too hard on yourself, nothing will ever be good enough to you even though it’s perfect to others.

Sorry for the gigantic post today. I just had a lot to share. Thank you all so much for who you are and everything you do. Please message me anytime. <3

kelseighanne  asked:

Hiya, Haven! I was wondering if you had heard of the 5 Love Languages and if so, which one is yours? Mine's Words of Affirmation.

Oh my goodness, I don’t even know how many times I have started to write a long post about that very thing, but I’ve stopped because I didn’t know if it would bore people and I was also thinking about explicitly working it into a scribbling somehow.  I have used it to inform how I write some of my characters, but I’ve thought about having characters actually talk about it.

So.

YES.

Thank you for sending this message.

I’ve been fascinated by the theory since I first heard about it, that must have been over 15 years ago. I’ve actually used it as part of lesson for a higher level ESL class in the past.

So, for anyone who has no idea what this is…

The Five Love Languages was first published in 1995 by Dr.Gary Chapman, a marriage and family counselor.  It was initially written for couples, but he has written further books that are focused on other groups (children, teenagers, etc.).  You can read more about him at his website.

I suppose that some people may be wary of his books due to his religious perspective, but I honestly do not think that fact impacts his work/theory in a negative way.  Anyone can read his books and find something useful and beneficial in them, regardless of philosophical and religious issues.  I have personally found his work to be extremely practical and helpful, more so than any other I’ve ever come across.  I think his academic background (MA in Anthropology and a seminary PhD) give him a very unique approach, one that does not necessarily see science and religion as enemies regarding the study of humanity.

His theory is that humans need and express affection/love in five general ways and when these “languages” are not understood, it can cause strife in a relationship because there is a feeling that a person is not loved.  He has piles of personal data and case studies that led him to this conclusion. He observed many couples who were having problems and noticed a theme of them being specific in their complaints about the other person.  Those specifics led him to identify the five languages (with dialects within each one) as: 

  1. Words of Affirmation
  2. Physical Touch
  3. Quality Time
  4. Gifts
  5. Acts Of Service

He suggests that we can identify a person’s love language and learn how to speak it, thus doing what we can to help the person see that we love and value them.  The theory claims that people have a primary love language, while some have a close secondary one and some may not.  There is also the distinction between what we Give to others and what we Need from others, this is not the same for all people.  A person may be very verbal naturally and Give Words of Affirmation, but feel the most loved by others through thoughtful Gifts.

As a basic example:

Person A may feel that Person B no longer cares about them.  There is frustration and lack of productive communication.  Person A says “Person B doesn’t care about me!  We never go out to dinner, we never just sit and talk. They are always on their phone or watching tv!”  Person B responds with “But I tell Person A how much I love them all the time! I always tell them how nice they look!”  Dr.Chapman’s theory is that Person A’s primary love language is probably Quality Time, but Person B’s is Words Of Affirmation.  Daily verbal protestations of love from Person B are meaningless to Person A, because that is not their love language; they need to spend time with Person B and have their full attention to feel truly cared for.  

Of course, he does not propose that this theory is some kind of magic fix to any and all relationship problems.  What he does offer is a tool that has been proven to help troubled relationships become healthy.  I think that the theory can also explain why some relationships begin with such a bang if two people have similar love languages and then fizzle when they realize that they are very different in their life goals and belief systems and are simply not compatible long term.

Upon my introduction to it, it was easy for me to figure out that I give Acts of Service, but I couldn’t pin down what I need/receive.  It wasn’t until within the last year, when I was kind of rediscovering it, that I figured out it is Physical Touch with Words of Affirmation on its heels. I also try to be aware of what the people around me Need.  My only sibling Gives and Needs Gifts, so I try to make birthdays and Christmas big for them.  

You can download the 30 question version of the assessment:

The nature of the questions in both of these documents is basically the same, it just differs in some of the vocabulary and how they are phrased.

Okay! So now, on to the important stuff!

Thomas William Hiddleston!

I think it’s obvious that he is Physical Touch (which he mainly Gives) and Words of Affirmation (which is his primary Need language).  This is why I sometimes refer to him as “PT baby” when he’s being all huggy and touchy feely.  

While you read that, you are probably thinking of certain examples that back it up.  Think about how he interacts with people, what he says about himself, how he reacts to certain things that are said to him, etc.

You also might be thinking about people in your life and trying to identify their language.  I really encourage everyone to check out the assessments linked above and the website.  It’s time well spent.

anonymous asked:

Where should you start getting into the PC-98 Touhou games, when you already play the modern games?

mmm that’s kind of hard to say? my first touhou game ever was lotus land story and i don’t think that’s a bad way to get into it, especially since the final boss is a familiar face from the windows games, buuut there’s pros and cons to all the games, so since i am Very Passionate about the pc-98s here’s like, a proper guide. i’ve put it under the cut since it’s very long (oops).

to summarize, though, lotus land story and mystic square will be most familiar to you if you’ve played the windows games, so starting there isn’t a bad idea, unless you you want a challenge, or something more unfamiliar. or both.

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Some Tumblr GIFing tips

I’m not an expert - I’m still learning every day, when I have the time (ahaha -_-), so this isn’t a tutorial on how to make awesome GIFs, it’s just a few tips on how to get started as well as some things that took me ages to figure out on my own. Started this for Pleth and have been working on it sporadically ever since; HI PLETH. /wave

Note: I use Photoshop CS6, so this is based off that. Earlier versions of PS might work the same way, but then again, they might not. :(

Size
Converting video to GIF
Frames
Actions/scripts
Adjustments/PSDs
Text
Tweaking

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Chip's Favorite Games of 2014 and Some Other Things

Hi, this is Chip and I’m not cool enough to get my top ten games of 2014 list put anywhere, but I’m still going to make one.

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goneje-deactivated20170210  asked:

hey i was wondering what programs do you use to make the daily doodles?

Heeeey Jessgeekz!

The way I do it is pretty simple, and as far as what programs I use, everything is free online so anyone could do it if they were so inclined (as long as you have internet access and a computer of course).

The way I do it is also probably very dumb, as I taught myself my own way of doing things (along with what my much smarter friends taught me).  It works for me and my brain can understand it, so I’ve been happy with the results so far.

The short version: I use a combination of Photoshop and Adobe Premiere, with almost all of the animation happening in Premiere.

I don’t wanna bore everyone with the details, so if you’re interested in seeing test versions of a GIF and longer explanations along the way, please click past the READ MORE!

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