and have no citations

anonymous asked:

Hi cunt women are lesser animals,with usually smaller brains, less neurons, and less synapses. That's why women rely more on instinct and emotion, rather than logic or reason. That also explains women's relative lack of intellectual accomplishments or invention over the past 3,000 years (and more). Your gender's main contributions have been singing, giving birth, cooking and cleaning, Nearly everything women have accomplished is with help from men or from a group of men. Women deserve no rights

Hi dickhead I’m feeling petty this morning so I’m gonna eviscerate this swill part by part. It seems like the concept of basic science confuses you. I’ll start by citing this article for you and provide some choice quotes. It used a heavily peer-reviewed study and the methodology was completely sound (i read the whole goddamn original work and several of its external citations).

“On average, for example, men tend to have a larger amygdala, a region associated with emotion. Such differences are small and highly influenced by the environment, yet they have still been used to paint a binary picture of the human brain,“

“Depending on whether the researchers looked at gray matter, white matter, or the diffusion tensor imaging data, between 23% and 53% of brains contained a mix of regions that fell on the male-end and female-end of the spectrum. Very few of the brains—between 0% and 8%—contained all male or all female structures.” 

A list of early inventions by women (it includes elevated rail-lines, Kevlar, and the submarine telescope! the lack of patents taken out by women early on is actually because men made it illegal for a woman to hold a patent in her name until the early 1900s. those darn men, always inhibiting progress)

 A detailed list of several well-known contemporary female scholars

Here’s Wikipedia’s list of Muslim women who made significant intellectual achievements

A list of 30 Black women who made history

A detailed history of Asian women’s contributions

Notable Native American women from the past 350 years

Here’s TWO articles on the contributions of trans women in contemporary culture (the first one also includes nonbinary people, just a heads up. It seemed more relevant than many of the others tho)

You know what fuck you here’s 50 more women who did important shit

Wikipedia’s history of lesbian literature (which lists a lot of books and authors)

Tbh I do agree with you on the singing being a main contribution, just because women have nicer voices (in my opinion) and are much more likely to use their songwriting expertise to push activist and progressive agendas.

Maybe don’t come into my inbox with this shit when you don’t know what you’re talking about? Put away the 18th century medical book and take a chill pill.

This couple is being charged $100 a day for the racist graffiti someone left on their home

  • On Jan. 14, the Stamford, Connecticut, home of Heather Lindsay and her husband Lexene Charles was defaced with racist graffiti — someone had spray-painted the word “n***er” across their garage door. 
  • Now, the couple is being fined $100 by the city — because they refuse to clean off the slur until the authorities “do their job,” as Lindsay told the Stamford Advocate on Monday.
  • After they found the slur on their metal garage door in January, Lindsay and Charles reported the graffiti to Stamford police. But the department told the Advocate they have no witnesses to the incident and that no security cameras in the neighborhood recorded it.
  • Ted Jankowski, Stamford’s director of public safety, told the Advocate police offered to remove the slur — but Lindsay and Charles said not to.
  • She told the Advocate she wants Stamford police to find the person, or people, responsible — and “not just cover it up and sweep it under the table as they have done in the past.”
  • But now, because of the couple’s refusal to remove the slur from their garage door, Lindsay and Charles have been issued a blight citation from the city — which comes with a fine of $100 a day. Read more (2/22/17 11:09 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

Highlights from Talks Machina (Episode 100)

Since the inimitable @eponymous-rose is off doing piddly little things like preparing for her PhD defense tomorrow, I’m going to do my best to fill her shoes with tonight’s Talks Machina. We start late, so at least that’s the same!

  • Everyone walks out with massive balloons that spell “28″ for the 28th episode of TM. Brian is given a paper crown. It glitters.
  • Everyone else also wears paper crowns after the break, except for Travis because his head is too big for them.
  • Ep. 100 tied with 55 and 61 for the most nat 20s in one episode. 100 was also the longest to date, beating episode 88 by about 8 minutes.
  • Lady Briarwood has been missing for 546 real days.
  • The players have spent 95 real hours in combat since the stream started. Earlier, Liam demanded Brian announce he has the most nat 20s so far, even over Percy [citation needed].
  • Brian plans to have a full-cast TM extravaganza after the show completes.
  • When the game first started, Scanlan’s attraction to Pike was primarily based on them being similar sizes, though he flirted with almost everyone. However, he was growing on Pike a lot before he left, which is part of why it hurt her so badly. 
  • Keyleth has mixed emotions about Scanlan’s return, which Marisha feels matches her personal growth into True Neutral.
  • Travis, Marisha, and Ashley all agree the relationship with Scanlan probably won’t go back to the way it was before.
  • Travis loved and hated the double ones. “It was so perfect.” He only has one set of dice, so he doesn’t believe in dice jail. Ashley is envious of both his dice simplicity and Laura’s colorful dice “candy bag.”
  • Scanlan’s praying to Sarenrae was a moment where Pike’s heart softened. They’re all still nervous about where things will go with him, but that was a big step. Grog and Marisha (not Keyleth) think he’s full of it.
  • Grog doesn’t think of Lionel as a rival, but is annoyed that this “younger, hotter version of him” is getting all the attention. He doesn’t think Grog can begin to work through his anger with Scanlan until Lionel leaves.
  • Marisha describes Grog as Lennie from Mice and Men in terms of casuing heartbreak.
  • If Scanlan saved Pike’s life at the expense of someone else in the party, she would be furious. She says “Momstah” very begrudgingly.
  • Travis loves Pike and Grog’s bromance. Ashley loves how their backstory started as a bit of a joke, but has become something very real.
  • All three of them were terrified the reveal was going to be Allura.
  • Marisha wasn’t worried when Pike was Feebleminded because she knew she had Greater Restoration. Ashley was more worried because Liam was insisting she’d be stuck that way for a month.
  • Marisha didn’t expect the Silas disguise to work, she just wanted to surprise Delilah enough to allow VM to attack first.
  • Ashley thinks Pike is capable of forgiving Delilah if the opportunity presents itself, but if not, she’ll totally kill her.
  • Keyleth is afraid to go through the orb due to her last experience.
  • No one knew what the Prismatic Sphere was. Keyleth thought it was a fire wall. Grog had planned to run headlong into it on his next turn.
  • Grog basically shut down when Scanlan arrived the way he did (in disguise, lying). Travis didn’t really know how he would react until Pike said she was angry too.
  • Pike is worried that the conversation with Sarenrae was not a hopeful one. She feels this mission is now something VM must do together.
  • No one feels like they’ve been on for a hundred episodes. Marisha and Ashley measure time as before and after CR.
  • Ashley wishes she could go back and tell Pike not to miss the opportunity to tell someone she loved them, because “once the moment passes, it’s gone.”

TM: After Dark, Equally As Dark Edition

  • Travis hosts! Grog would have never shown Lionel the Deck, but he considered making Scanlan draw a card to get back on his good side.
  • Everyone hopes for an evil version of VM in the Shadowfell.
  • Ashley would like to have a glittery beard. Brian chews on his.
  • There are still tin pots and pans in the Bag of Holding from the original days when Travis was excitedly shoving everything in it.
  • Marisha is asked to give another inspirational hug. She describes Brian as smelling of fresh laundry and despair.
  • If Ashley were transported to Exandria, she would be most excited about real pointy ears. Travis would like to see the weapons. Marisha would like to know how to make decorative antler headdresses stay in place.
  • At one point during the costumed photo shoot, the girls were trying to look pretty in a meadow, so Travis walked into the woods and flexed a lot.
  • Marisha’s notes are very unorganized. She does do quick sketches and “sets the scene” at the top of the page for quick reference. She used to keep notes on her phone in the home game, but switched to paper for the stream. She liked being able to quickly search those notes.
  • Brian really likes the show Falling Skies. Marisha has been binging Treehouse Masters.

chestnut-podfic  asked:

🔥 Elven hair physics?

wow I’m not sure I’ve had enough gin for this but ok:

1) Elves have super long hair, like, Luthien has enough hair to make a cloak out of it and wind it into a rope to climb down Hirilorn with? that is a lot of hair.

2) long hair is, on its own, very annoying and gets in the way a lot. so clearly Elves have something else going on that ameliorates the desire to just go for it with the scissors.

3) Elves have much more control over their bodies than humans. their command over their physical forms is at “all times greater than it has ever been among men” and “far excelled the spirits of Men in power over [their bodies]” (Of Death and the Severance of Fea and Hroa, LACE).

4) therefore, it’s prehensile. obviously.

List of medieval European scientists
  • Anthemius of Tralles (ca. 474 – ca. 534): a professor of geometry and architecture, authored many influential works on mathematics and was one of the architects of the famed Hagia Sophia, the largest building in the world at its time. His works were among the most important source texts in the Arab world and Western Europe for centuries after.
  • John Philoponus (ca. 490–ca. 570): also known as John the Grammarian, a Christian Byzantine philosopher, launched a revolution in the understanding of physics by critiquing and correcting the earlier works of Aristotle. In the process he proposed important concepts such as a rudimentary notion of inertia and the invariant acceleration of falling objects. Although his works were repressed at various times in the Byzantine Empire, because of religious controversy, they would nevertheless become important to the understanding of physics throughout Europe and the Arab world.
  • Paul of Aegina (ca. 625–ca. 690): considered by some to be the greatest Christian Byzantine surgeon, developed many novel surgical techniques and authored the medical encyclopedia Medical Compendium in Seven Books. The book on surgery in particular was the definitive treatise in Europe and the Islamic world for hundreds of years.
  • The Venerable Bede (ca. 672–735): a Christian monk of the monasteries of Wearmouth and Jarrow who wrote a work On the Nature of Things, several books on the mathematical / astronomical subject of computus, the most influential entitled On the Reckoning of Time. He made original discoveries concerning the nature of the tides and his works on computus became required elements of the training of clergy, and thus greatly influenced early medieval knowledge of the natural world.
  • Rabanus Maurus (c. 780 – 856): a Christian monk and teacher, later archbishop of Mainz, who wrote a treatise on Computus and the encyclopedic work De universo. His teaching earned him the accolade of "Praeceptor Germaniae," or "the teacher of Germany."
  • Abbas Ibn Firnas (810 – 887): a polymath and inventor in Muslim Spain, made contributions in a variety of fields and is most known for his contributions to glass-making and aviation. He developed novel ways of manufacturing and using glass. He broke his back at an unsuccessful attempt at flying a primitive hang glider in 875.
  • Pope Sylvester II (c. 946–1003): a Christian scholar, teacher, mathematician, and later pope, reintroduced the abacus and armillary sphere to Western Europe after they had been lost for centuries following the Greco-Roman era. He was also responsible in part for the spread of the Hindu-Arabic numeral system in Western Europe.
  • Maslamah al-Majriti (died 1008): a mathematician, astronomer, and chemist in Muslim Spain, made contributions in many areas, from new techniques for surveying to updating and improving the astronomical tables of al-Khwarizmi and inventing a process for producing mercury oxide.[citation needed] He is most famous, though, for having helped transmit knowledge of mathematics and astronomy to Muslim Spain and Christian Western Europe.
  • Abulcasis (936-1013): a physician and scientist in Muslim Spain, is considered to be the father of modern surgery. He wrote numerous medical texts, developed many innovative surgical instruments, and developed a variety of new surgical techniques and practices. His texts were considered the definitive works on surgery in Europe until the Renaissance.
  • Constantine the African (c. 1020&–1087): a Christian native of Carthage, is best known for his translating of ancient Greek and Roman medical texts from Arabic into Latin while working at the Schola Medica Salernitana in Salerno, Italy. Among the works he translated were those of Hippocrates and Galen.
  • Arzachel (1028–1087): the foremost astronomer of the early second millennium, lived in Muslim Spain and greatly expanded the understanding and accuracy of planetary models and terrestrial measurements used for navigation. He developed key technologies including the equatorium and universal latitude-independent astrolabe.
  • Avempace (died 1138): a famous physicist from Muslim Spain who had an important influence on later physicists such as Galileo. He was the first to theorize the concept of a reaction force for every force exerted.
  • Adelard of Bath (c. 1080 – c. 1152): was a 12th-century English scholar, known for his work in astronomy, astrology, philosophy and mathematics.
  • Avenzoar (1091–1161): from Muslim Spain, introduced an experimental method in surgery, employing animal testing in order to experiment with surgical procedures before applying them to human patients.[4] He also performed the earliest dissections and postmortem autopsies on both humans as well as animals.
  • Robert Grosseteste (1168–1253): Bishop of Lincoln, was the central character of the English intellectual movement in the first half of the 13th century and is considered the founder of scientific thought in Oxford. He had a great interest in the natural world and wrote texts on the mathematical sciences of optics, astronomy and geometry. In his commentaries on Aristotle's scientific works, he affirmed that experiments should be used in order to verify a theory, testing its consequences. Roger Bacon was influenced by his work on optics and astronomy.
  • Albert the Great (1193–1280): Doctor Universalis, was one of the most prominent representatives of the philosophical tradition emerging from the Dominican Order. He is one of the thirty-three Saints of the Roman Catholic Church honored with the title of Doctor of the Church. He became famous for his vast knowledge and for his defence of the pacific coexistence between science and religion. Albert was an essential figure in introducing Greek and Islamic science into the medieval universities, although not without hesitation with regard to particular Aristotelian theses. In one of his most famous sayings he asserted: "Science does not consist in ratifying what others say, but of searching for the causes of phenomena." Thomas Aquinas was his most famous pupil.
  • John of Sacrobosco (c. 1195 – c. 1256): was a scholar, monk, and astronomer (probably English, but possibly Irish or Scottish) who taught at the University of Paris and wrote an authoritative and influential mediaeval astronomy text, the Tractatus de Sphaera; the Algorismus, which introduced calculations with Hindu-Arabic numerals into the European university curriculum; the Compotus ecclesiasticis on Easter reckoning; and the Tractatus de quadrante on the construction and use of the astronomical quadrant.
  • Jordanus de Nemore (late 12th, early 13th century): was one of the major pure mathematicians of the Middle Ages. He wrote treatises on mechanics ("the science of weights"), on basic and advanced arithmetic, on algebra, on geometry, and on the mathematics of stereographic projection.
  • Villard de Honnecourt (fl. 13th century): a French engineer and architect who made sketches of mechanical devices such as automatons and perhaps drew a picture of an early escapement mechanism for clockworks.
  • Roger Bacon (1214–94): Doctor Admirabilis, joined the Franciscan Order around 1240 where, influenced by Grosseteste, Alhacen and others, he dedicated himself to studies where he implemented the observation of nature and experimentation as the foundation of natural knowledge. Bacon wrote in such areas as mechanics, astronomy, geography and, most of all, optics. The optical research of Grosseteste and Bacon established optics as an area of study at the medieval university and formed the basis for a continuous tradition of research into optics that went all the way up to the beginning of the 17th century and the foundation of modern optics by Kepler.[8]
  • Ibn al-Baitar (died 1248): a botanist and pharmacist in Muslim Spain, researched over 1400 types of plants, foods, and drugs and compiled pharmaceutical and medical encyclopedias documenting his research. These were used in the Islamic world and Europe until the 19th century.
  • Theodoric Borgognoni (1205-1296): was an Italian Dominican friar and Bishop of Cervia who promoted the uses of both antiseptics and anaesthetics in surgery. His written work had a deep impact on Henri de Mondeville, who studied under him while living in Italy and later became the court physician for King Philip IV of France.
  • William of Saliceto (1210-1277): was an Italian surgeon of Lombardy who advanced medical knowledge and even challenged the work of the renowned Greco-Roman surgeon Galen (129-216 AD) by arguing that allowing pus to form in wounds was detrimental to the health of he patient.
  • Thomas Aquinas (1227–74): Doctor Angelicus, was an Italian theologian and friar in the Dominican Order. As his mentor Albert the Great, he is a Catholic Saint and Doctor of the Church. In addition to his extensive commentaries on Aristotle's scientific treatises, he was also said to have written an important alchemical treatise titled Aurora Consurgens. However, his most lasting contribution to the scientific development of the period was his role in the incorporation of Aristotelianism into the Scholastic tradition.
  • Arnaldus de Villa Nova (1235-1313): was an alchemist, astrologer, and physician from the Crown of Aragon who translated various Arabic medical texts, including those of Avicenna, and performed optical experiments with camera obscura.
  • John Duns Scotus (1266–1308): Doctor Subtilis, was a member of the Franciscan Order, philosopher and theologian. Emerging from the academic environment of the University of Oxford. where the presence of Grosseteste and Bacon was still palpable, he had a different view on the relationship between reason and faith as that of Thomas Aquinas. For Duns Scotus, the truths of faith could not be comprehended through the use of reason. Philosophy, hence, should not be a servant to theology, but act independently. He was the mentor of one of the greatest names of philosophy in the Middle Ages: William of Ockham.
  • Mondino de Liuzzi (c. 1270-1326): was an Italian physician, surgeon, and anatomist from Bologna who was one of the first in Medieval Europe to advocate for the public dissection of cadavers for advancing the field of anatomy. This followed a long-held Christian ban on dissections performed by the Alexandrian school in the late Roman Empire.
  • William of Ockham (1285–1350): Doctor Invincibilis, was an English Franciscan friar, philosopher, logician and theologian. Ockham defended the principle of parsimony, which could already be seen in the works of his mentor Duns Scotus. His principle later became known as Occam's Razor and states that if there are various equally valid explanations for a fact, then the simplest one should be chosen. This became a foundation of what would come to be known as the scientific method and one of the pillars of reductionism in science. Ockham probably died of the Black Plague. Jean Buridan and Nicole Oresme were his followers.
  • Jacopo Dondi dell'Orologio (1290-1359): was an Italian doctor, clockmaker, and astronomer from Padua who wrote on a number of scientific subjects such as pharmacology, surgery, astrology, and natural sciences. He also designed an astronomical clock.
  • Richard of Wallingford (1292-1336): an English abbot, mathematician, astronomer, and horologist who designed an astronomical clock as well as an equatorium to calculate the lunar, solar and planetary longitudes, as well as predict eclipses.
  • Jean Buridan (1300–58): was a French philosopher and priest. Although he was one of the most famous and influent philosophers of the late Middle Ages, his work today is not renowned by people other than philosophers and historians. One of his most significant contributions to science was the development of the theory of impetus, that explained the movement of projectiles and objects in free-fall. This theory gave way to the dynamics of Galileo Galilei and for Isaac Newton's famous principle of Inertia.
  • Guy de Chauliac (1300-1368): was a French physician and surgeon who wrote the Chirurgia magna, a widely read publication throughout medieval Europe that became one of the standard textbooks for medical knowledge for the next three centuries. During the Black Death he clearly distinguished Bubonic Plague and Pneumonic Plague as separate diseases, that they were contagious from person to person, and offered advice such as quarantine to avoid their spread in the population. He also served as the personal physician for three successive popes of the Avignon Papacy.
  • John Arderne (1307-1392): was an English physician and surgeon who invented his own anesthetic that combined hemlock, henbane, and opium. In his writings, he also described how to properly excise and remove the abscess caused by anal fistula.
  • Nicole Oresme (c. 1323–82): was one of the most original thinkers of the 14th century. A theologian and bishop of Lisieux, he wrote influential treatises in both Latin and French on mathematics, physics, astronomy, and economics. In addition to these contributions, Oresme strongly opposed astrology and speculated about the possibility of a plurality of worlds.
  • Giovanni Dondi dell'Orologio (c. 1330-1388): was a clockmaker from Padua, Italy who designed the astarium, an astronomical clock and planetarium that utilized the escapement mechanism that had been recently invented in Europe. He also attempted to describe the mechanics of the solar system with mathematical precision.

newt-fruit-main  asked:

Hey! I am very pro-AZA facilities, but I am a little bit concerned about your recent comment on sanctuary breeding. Sanctuaries and rescues are NOT receiving genetically valuable animals, usually they come with no genetic history, and are inbred for color morphs or mixed species (i.e. tigers)! This wouldn't be smart breeding for conservation like the SSPs! (1/?)

The animals they receive should essentially be considered like the excess domestic dog/cat populations in the US (only big and dangerous), because there truly are more than there are available suitable homes for. The argument of breeding for conservation in captivity has to be done in line with responsible breeding that’s part of a larger networked plan, because roadside zoos breed all kinds of animals irresponsibly (filling up the sanctuaries) and claim conservation.

Most of what you’re saying is true, and what you’re most concerned about re: the SSP mention is going to be an issue in the future. However, there are a couple things I want to respond to because they’re going to be super important for people who care about big cats to understand in the near future, in regards to conservation and the sanctuary industry and animal rights interactions. I’m gonna break those down below, but it’s not intended as a smackdown - you just gave me a great opening to talk about something I’ve been realizing I need to write about. To give you some context: I’ve spent the last couple months digging into the histories of sanctuaries and rescues as an industry and studying a lot of the exotic animal legislation that has been proposed/passed in the last couple decades. That means I’ve been researching the evolution of legislation and how animals move (both around the US, and between types of placement) in response to it, and what legal actions or public petitions influence those movements. The holistic picture is… interesting. 

First, though, I want to talk about a couple of the statements you made - because they’re super common in sanctuary messaging right now and, most importantly, have started showing up in legislation and lobbying regarding big cats recently. 

The lack of known lineage for big cats coming into sanctuaries and rescues was really only accurate in the 90s and potentially early 2000s, and from what I can really was at latest an issue up until 2007. The 90s was the period when the big cat population in private ownership in the US was out of control and rescue began to be a big deal - hence the formation of the current major big cat sanctuary organizations. The last large number of big cats of “unknown origin or lineage” left private hands and went into sanctuaries between 2004-2007, as people prepared for the full enforcement of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act (which, among other things, prohibited moving cats across state lines). After that point in time, the need for rescue - by which I mean hoarder situations or animals that truly were not receiving appropriate care, not exotic pet politics framed as abusive - dropped off sharply because anyone who hadn’t given up their big cats prior to 2007 was very aware that the CWSA meant that they were responsible for keeping those animals for life because they could no longer be easily transported to a new owner or another facility. So, a decade after that, animals coming into rescue are generally coming from either pet situations or are confiscations from private facilities. The people who are currently breeding big cats outside of AZA accreditation - regardless of what else you think about them or their practices - are smart enough to understand that inbreeding can occur and that tracking bloodlines is important. All of the exotic pet communities are pretty small and tight-knit in the US, so I can’t believe that there’s no known lineage for the animals currently ending up in sanctuaries. It might not go back more than a couple generations, or might not be something the sanctuaries are given, but it’s got to exist. 

I’m also really skeptical about the whole “there are more big cats than there are suitable homes for” messaging that’s omnipresent in the rescue and sanctuary industry right now, for two reasons. One, there’s no agreement on what a “suitable home” for a big cat is: the Animal Welfare Act is the federal set of requirements for appropriate care, but sanctuaries and animal rights groups consistently condemn places that meet that criteria, and only AZA likes the idea of AZA standards being a requirement for a suitable home, since most facilities don’t have the funding and mission to become part of the AZA. This means there’s no other set of standards that sanctuaries and rescues can point to to back up a claim about a situation for a big cat being ‘not good enough’. Since sanctuaries continue exist because they house confiscated animals, in the absence of data or concrete standards used to quantify a bad situation, any statement they make about big cat quality of care is inherently embroiled in politics. 

Two, the current numbers for captive big cats in the US just do not make sense. They’re all over the place and appear to be estimations because there aren’t primary source citations in any document - legislative or media - that I’ve found past 2003, and even that’s iffy. 

Let’s just look at tigers, for instance. In 2003, a paper Nyhus and Tillson estimated that there were anywhere between 5000-12,000 captive tigers in private hands alone in the US. The excuse given for such a huge potential range: the authors think most pet tigers would be kept illegally and not reported. It goes on to say the most likely estimates are between 7000-9000, but following up on those sources simply gives me news articles where the one of the authors is quoted about those numbers - there’s literally no data or study cited to support that. Okay, so, hold on, we’re guesstimating in a scientific paper about the existence of multiple thousands of tigers, multiple times more than exist in the wild, because of an utter absence of data and the determination that people lie? That doesn’t seem right.  But, then, in 2008 a report on tiger trafficking done by Fish and Wildlife said there are “as many as” 5000 tigers in the US - total, including in zoos and sanctuaries as well as private hands. They were using data from a single 2005 study, which estimated 3349 tigers in “private” hands (2120 in USDA licensed facilities that were not considered zoos or sanctuaries and 1129 in non-exhibition situations). That’s a drastic difference from 2003-2005, and only the 2005 citation shows evidence of actually having data backing it. Now, fast forward to the last couple of years. In 2014, the World Wildlife Fund states that of the 5000 tigers it thinks are in the US, 4700 of those tigers are in private hands. In 2015, the founder of the sanctuary group Tigers in America stated that he thinks there are actually upwards of 7000 tigers in the US with no mention of location. Neither of these statements have any sort of citation, and those numbers don’t make sense. It’s been a decade since the last mention I can find of an actual study of the locations of big cats in the US, so does that mean the numbers that are now being used in legislation and advocacy efforts are simply estimates based on how many pet tigers these organizations think people aren’t reporting? Not to mention, the numbers don’t make sense - the Captive Wildlife Safety Act, as well as many pieces of state-and local-level legislation restricting big cat ownership have majorly restricted the ownership, transport, and breeding of big cats. How are the numbers going up as legislation gets more restrictive? If anyone can show me actual data on the number of big cats in captivity in the US post-2005, I’ll happily update this post - until then, I remain pretty skeptical about this supposed surplus of big cats because after months of searching I’ve found no primary data anywhere to support it. 

Next, let’s chat about roadside zoos for a second. If you’re not aware of why I think that appellation is outdated and meaningless to the general public, please take a second to read this article I wrote about the topic. This is especially pertinent to this discussion, as many facilities outside of AZA (frequently referred to as roadside zoos) directly contribute to the success of SSP programs - see Mill Mountain Zoo’s success with Pallas Cats and Red Wolves, and Tanganyika Wildlife Park’s success with Clouded Leopard breeding. Not all non-AZA places are of the same quality - some do still promote breeding color morphs or talk about white tigers as a separate subspecies - but it’s inaccurate to say that all roadside zoos don’t contribute to conservation or just “fill up sanctuaries” with excess animals. 

Okay. Now, on to the SSP and sanctuaries comment. Most of the cats coming into sanctuaries right now are either previous pets or animals confiscated after animals rights investigations, as mentioned above. Right now, AR groups aren’t going after places that participate in SSPs… but that’s not going to last. For years, HSUS has been campaigning to close down every zoo that isn’t AZA. You can see that in their rhetoric, and in the fact that in every single piece of legislation and media they right they directly contrast how AZA does things with the horrors of roadside zoos. As of earlier this month, the CEO of HSUS made a statement indicating that AZA is partnering with them to help police the rest of the zoo industry - and the biggest focus that HSUS wants to see from AZA is help shutting down roadside zoos, according to a representative who spoke on HSUS’ behalf at the 2016 AZA national conference. It’s convenient that there’s no operant definition for “roadside zoo” published anywhere in HSUS literature since 1980, isn’t there? (See the linked article above for that discussion). This leads us to the question of what happens to the big cats in external facilities that participate in SSPs when animal rights organizations start going after facilities they deem “roadside zoos” or those they condemn for simply not being AZA. Somehow I sincerely doubt they’ll deviate from the long-term plan of shutting them all down just because they happen to support a decent big cat conservation program. When HSUS lobbies to have a facility investigated, and the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF, the legal branch of the AR organizations) get involved with advocating to have animals removed from a facility, there’s always a sanctuary or two ready and willing to take those poor animals -  and they’re all ones that are tightly associated with the animal rights organizations and decry the breeding of their residents. So yes, I do think we’re going to see genetically valued animals “rescued” from facilities where they were part of legitimate, planned breeding programs in the near future and put in sanctuaries where they can no longer contribute to the conservation of their species. 

I also don’t think it’s a stretch to say that the animal rights organizations will eventually start going after AZA, once all the other zoos have been driven out of business or had their animals confiscated. The head of BCR has said publicly that she wants to see all cats removed from zoos and in sanctuaries by 2025 - and that she plans on doing it by first turning the public against roadside zoos, and then by taking in all the big cats the zoos abandon after she convinces the public that they’re fundamentally immoral for having them. That lines up pretty neatly with the current rhetoric coming out of sanctuaries and animal rights organizations about zoos right now, and hey, BCR and HSUS and ALDF are all sponsors of all the recent big cat welfare petitions to the USDA and heavily involved in lobbying for congressional legislation like the Big Cat Public Safety Act. Still not convinced? In the newest iteration of the BCPSA, AZA-accredited facilities are no longer accorded their historical exemption from the proposed regulations. 

Big cat sanctuaries may currently only have cats who aren’t considered valuable to conservation programs, but I don’t think it’ll stay that way. All of the animals who came into the sanctuaries because of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act in 2007 (along with a ton of funding, because pretty faces and sob stories are great for fundraising) are reaching the end of their natural lifespans. If the sanctuaries want to continue to exist, they have to get new animals from somewhere - and you can see them beginning to turn against the zoo industry and demand ownership of their animals. It’s scary, but it’s real, and it looks like it’s starting already - in late 2016, ALDF notified Landry’s Downtown Aquarium (an AZA facility) of their intent to sue for removal of their tigers under the Endangered Species Act if Landry’s did not send the cats to an accredited sanctuary. 

Some of the relevant citations:

anonymous asked:

i dont actually know if this is accurate, and i cant find a straight answer when i google it, but cant insurance companies not deny you based on preexisting conditions? i thought that was part of obamacare that trumpcare kept, so wouldnt adding all these conditions be good cause now insurance companies actually cant deny you insurance based on those? or did trumpcare not really keep the whole "insurance companies cant deny you based on preexisting conditions" thing?

Again, I have not said that insurance companies would be able to deny you over pre-existing conditions, instead I’ve stated that protections will be removed from people with them. 

States will be allowed to opt out of provisions that required insurance companies to cover “essential health benefits” and charge everyone the same regardless of their health history. 

Right now, the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) protects those with pre-existing conditions. Insurers are not allowed to deny patients or treat them unequally for having a pre-existing condition. They are not allowed to charge more and essentially keep these patients from obtaining insurance. Trump’s American Health Care Act will end these PROTECTIONS, meaning that states can opt out and allow insurers to basically do whatever they want regarding pre-existing conditions. 

If it’s anything like it was before then those with pre-existing conditions will start seeing costs drive up 5x - 10x higher than those without. This doesn’t deny them necessarily but it squeezes them out through pricing. It’s pretty obvious what the intentions are of doing this and that’s exactly why protections are in place. It’s not saying “we are denying you because you have _____,” it’s saying “we are now charging you 10 times more than that person and if you can’t afford it then oh well, I guess no insurance for you.” It’s a not-so-sneaky way of doing the same thing. 

Devil's Advocate

Lots of people seem to have forgotten what this means. It means you agree with the person you are arguing with and are bringing up all counterarguments you can think of so they become prepared to defend against them when their ideas are challenged by people not on their side. It is an important part of learning to debate since people will not agree with you all the time even with the same facts and being ready for common counter arguments helps you stay focused instead of being derailed.

WHAT IS DEVILS ADVOCATE:
–Someone on your side making sure you have a counter argument to an opposing point they bring up. You may think it’s a commonly debunked point but that may be your bubble talking so try to take it at face value.
–Someone bringing in new information to make sure you have it accounted for in your argument. Preferably with citations but they may forget them so just ask if they did.
–Someone asking you to explain it in a way that relies less on familiarity with the subject. Yes there is google but never forget you opinions on a subject have been shaped by your whole life of learning so a google search or other recent lookup still will not impart the same level of knowledge you may have on a subject. Be ready to explain to people less educated on issues, always.
–Someone asking you to rephrase because they think your prior wording confuses the issue or may have said something you did not intend.

WHAT IS NOT DEVILS ADVOCATE:
–Someone trying to change your mind on an issue directly. A proper devils advocate may cause you to tweak your stance a bit as you refine your argument, but is never looking for an out and out reversal of opinion or even a huge stance change.
–Someone bringing up every counter argument at once (unless they state they are simply listing common counters you will need to keep in mind) because this is usually done to try and discredit the core argument. A devils advocate is NOT trying to discredit your argument they are trying to help better your ability to make your argument.
–Someone outright sealioning you by harping on one thing you said and ignoring it when you do address it to continue harping that one thing as if it is still unaddressed. This is someone not looking for debate but more to rule you up. Disengage upon realizing they are doing it as it will go nowhere.
–Anyone trying to take the argument somewhere totally unrelated.

SO:
–You are not the devils advocate if you are trying to change someone’s mind beyond “I need to strengthen my argument.” You’re just debating with them.
–You are not the devils advocate if you hold a totally opposite position and are arguing for it. That’s just debating with them.
–You are not the devils advocate if you are trying to discredit an argument altogether.

Devils advocates are on the same side as the person they are debating and are simply trying to help strengthen their argument. If you actually want to debate them by all means do it but that is not the same thing as being a devils advocate; don’t mislabel it. If you think someone is not being helpful as a devils advocate say so, so that they or you can clarify the misunderstanding or so they of you can realize it’s really a normal debate and treat it as such. There nothing wrong with arguing without being a devils advocate, just don’t use the label incorrectly if it if not share you are doing.

Full medal jacket

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about Steve’s decorations in the MCU—or rather, the lack of them—and especially about Bucky’s medals, which are nonexistent. I’m writing a fic where there’s some discussion about decorations, valor, and the fact that Bucky was a war hero, trying to make sense of the incoherent hack writing of CACW that has the media identifying the “infamous Winter Soldier” as James Buchanan Barnes, but apparently no one seems to also be talking about the fact that this is Howling Commando James Barnes, Captain America’s best friend James Barnes, decorated war hero James Barnes. (laporcupina has a nice examination of this here.)

The first time we see Steve in his Captain’s uniform, he’s wearing these ribbons and badges

Sigh. He’s so dreamy… There’s a few different posts floating around identifying what those ribbons and badges are, but the most important is that he’s wearing the ribbons for only two medals: one is the purple heart with an oak leaf cluster, which signifies that he was wounded in action at least twice (once for the original medal, the oak leaves for another award). That one’s interesting because we don’t see him get wounded, really, in the First Avenger; it could mean, though, that the multiple purple hearts were for meritorious service because they were given for that at that time. He’s also wearing an American Service Defense Medal ribbon, which confuses me, because in the MCU he shouldn’t wear it: they were given for active service from 1939–1941, so he wouldn’t have had this. (In the comics, yes, but not the movies.) I chalk this up to Marvel’s notoriously terrible props department, the folks who gave us a museum display with two different birthdates for Bucky on the SAME DISPLAY, and use quotation marks and apostrophes for feet and inches, when no self-respecting museum would do that. (Those are the tip of the props issues iceberg but my personal pet peeves.)

Now, this shot is presumably in the scene where he blows off Senator Brandt in London, where he’s supposed to receive a “Medal for Valour” which is never specified. And it’s irritating because: which was it? Was it the Medal of Honor, the highest award you can earn? Or was it the Distinguished Service Cross, the second highest award for valor? It could even be the Silver Star, although I feel like that’s unlikely because single-handedly rescuing 400-plus men from a heavily guarded prison camp is a lot more than Silver Star-worthy. My feeling is that it was the DSC, maybe because they figured they’d save the MoH for later since he’d probably be raking in medals as he won the war. I can buy him not wearing it right then since the ceremony just happened, but…it’s a stretch.

Then immediately after, we see Steve with the men who will become the Howlies, and no one has any decorations on their uniforms/they’re not in full uniform…and then there’s Bucky. He has no decorations even when we see him in the service uniform at the start of CATFA, and he’s certainly not wearing any in the pub.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

HELLO. I'M BACK. (Ok, this is only my second time requesting but that's ok.) It's the Anon who requested the Taehyung x reader that accidentally turned angsty. But it's ok! It was really good! Anyways, I'm back to request 2 + 69 with Jungkook if that's ok. (You two write so well)

Prompt request: “Are you kidding me right now!?” + “You have approximately 5 seconds to get out of my face before I kill you.”

Pairing: Jungkook/Reader

Genre: Humour + Fluff

Summary: You have a paper due in twenty minutes and it’s a stressful time. You prefer to work at the library, because your university’s computers run much faster than your cheap laptop. Unfortunately, someone else seems to appreciate the technology and appears to be playing League of Legends on your computer.

Word count: 945 words


You might have shed a few tears when you noticed you were missing a citation on your twenty-page paper that was due in twenty minutes. But you definitely did cry when you realized you referenced an actual book instead of a website.

Shooting up from your chair, you received a few concerned glances from the students around you. Paying them no mind, you darted to the second level of the library in an attempt to find the book you had read earlier that week.

As you wandered aimlessly through the shelves, you checked the time on your watch. You had fifteen minutes left. Cold sweat dripped down your back as you searched for the ancient history section.

Finally, you found the section (it was actually on the third floor) with twelve minutes left. If you recalled correctly, you were fairly certain that the book you referenced was red. And that was all you knew.

Your breathing quickened as you scanned the shelves, examining every red book in the section. Glancing briefly at your watch, you realized you only had seven minutes left. Returning to the task at hand with renewed vigour, you dove towards the nearest red book. Once you pulled it from the shelf, you finally recognized the cover.

“Thank god,” you practically sobbed. Clutching the book to your chest, you darted back the main level of the library, nearly tripping down the stairs as you went. An imaginary clocked ticked away in your head.

You reached your computer with four minutes to spare.

But there was a slight problem.

A boy was sitting at your computer, his large frame hunched towards the monitor. His fingers danced over the keyboard and he clicked the mouse furiously. He had a hood pulled over his mess of brown hair, and from what you could see, he was biting his lip as he focused on the screen in front of him.

And what was he so focused on? This boy was literally playing League of Legends on your computer.

“Are you kidding me right now!?” you shrieked, slamming the book onto the desk beside the boy. He jumped in surprise, eyes widening as he turned to look up at you.

“Uh, I can explain–”

You cut the boy off mid-sentence, grabbing him by the front of his hoodie.

“You have approximately 5 seconds to get out of my face before I kill you,” you hissed, feeling slightly frenzied due to your rapidly approaching deadline and a chronic lack of sleep.

The boy quickly shut off the game and jumped from the seat. He moved aside, eyes cast down. You didn’t bother sitting. Luckily, the boy hadn’t signed out of your account, so you pulled up your assignment. You grabbed your book and located the publication information and relevant page numbers as fast as you could.

In the end, you submitted your paper online with thirty seconds to spare.

When you turned to collect your belongings from where you had scattered them earlier, you were surprised to see that the League-playing boy was still there.

“Uh, I-I can explain that,” he stammered nervously, light pink dusting his cheeks. “But I just wanted to say sorry–I didn’t realize you had to submit a paper.”

You smiled, feeling a little bad for scaring the other student. Upon closer inspection, you realized he was quite good looking. He had large eyes, a strong nose, and a full lower lip, which was bright red from all the nervous biting.

“I’m not going to say it’s fine, because who the fuck plays League in the library?” you laughed, pleased to see the boy relax a little. “But I didn’t mean to freak out that much. Just…stressed, you know?”

“Who plays League–period,” the boy snorted, almost to himself. He looked somewhere else in the library, his expression pained. “My friends dared me to do that.”

You followed his line of vision, settling on two other boys who sat at another row of computers. They were laughing hard, receiving annoyed looks from the people around them. One of them had a wide, rectangular smile and the other had little crescent eyes.

You realized all these boys were ridiculously cute, and wondered if all good-looking people just automatically became friends. Eventually, you turned back to the offending boy, whose expression had become sour.

“I just have to say one more thing before I leave,” the boy said with a long-suffering sigh. He met your eyes, inhaling slowly and blushing even more. “W-wanna come back to my base and check out my Needlessly Large Rod?”

You stared up, wide-eyed, at the boy in front of you. In the distance, you could hear the sound of unrestrained laughter. The boy covered his face with his hands, and after a moment of shock, you burst out laughing.

Tears streaked down your cheeks as you laughed uncontrollably. You wiped them away hastily as the boy glanced back at you, surprised. Eventually, you were able to compose yourself.

“Wow, I’m swooning,” you giggled. After a week of stress, you finally felt the tension slipping away.

“Thanks,” the boy cringed. He glanced at his friends and then back at you. “I’m Jungkook, by the way. Sorry we had to meet like this.”

“I’m Y/N,” you replied with an easy smile. “And it’s fine. You left quite an impression.”


A few weeks later, you were dragged to your university’s video game club’s weekly meeting. It turned out that Jungkook and his two friends (who later introduced themselves as Jimin and Taehyung) made up the club’s executive team.

That day, Jungkook asked you out with another lame League of Legends inspired pick-up line.

You accepted his proposition without a second thought.

- Girl in Luv

Oh my GOD I HATE MYSELF. Why do I always reference lame ass things? Is LoL even relevant anymore?? Anyway…thanks for reading. Hope you enjoyed! Our requests are still open, so check out our prompts page if you’re interested! Happy reading~

  • Officer: Is this marijuana in your luggage?
  • Lauren: Stop making assumptions.
  • Officer: Then what is it?
  • Lauren: An accident. One that I will never live down.
  • Officer: We're going to have to issue you a citation.
  • Lauren: So annoying omg...
  • Officer: One of your five friends may accompany y-
  • Lauren: WE'RE VERY SEPARATELY SINGLE

this is my concluding paragraph of my thesis…i did it yall


My thesis work, Body Pillow, documents the beginnings of a non-figurative exploration of tension, of gender, of violence, of craft-based notions of productivity and perfection. In this exploration I utilize the particular tools of gendered expectations and practices to critique these very institutions and rethink my own future as an artist and as a queer woman as one disconnected from reproduction, from success, from productivity and from positivity and figure a future that embraces failure, ugliness, aggression, and destruction. I understand now that destruction is integral to the expression of my frustrations previously without an outlet, that to reclaim my autonomy I must remember to be angry, to cut at, rip into, and altogether destroy the modes of being that I used to embrace. In softness there exists tension, perfection contains years of failures, and within fabric there is flesh.

how to write a research paper with 0 stress

Papers where you have to have citations are the worst, but if you have to do them here’s a tip from me because I’ve been writing them the same way for a year and it’s way easier.

1) figure out what you want to “prove” with your paper. basically your thesis statement, but you don’t need to write it out as such yet

2) figure out the different ways in which you’re going to prove it. these are your topic sentences, but again, you don’t need to write them out yet

3) gather your sources that you will cite. find any relevant citations and write them out in proper citation format (MLA, APA, etc). 

4) organize your citations into categories based on your topic sentences. this cite proves my point in this way, and this other one proves it in this way.

5) type your paragraphs around the citations. have them in the same place and figure out how to connect them, and there’s your paper

doing it this way, I can write a 7 page research paper in about 2 hours total. seeing all your proof and writing about why it proves what you want to prove is WAY easier than writing why something might prove your point and then finding out that it actually doesn’t

i feel like the fundamental ideological divide they’re using for civil war is that steve is reacting to the winter soldier while tony is reacting to age of ultron

steve is afraid of being controlled, of being forced to take action or inaction even when his own moral code disagrees, or when he’s not given all the information (this ties a lot into bucky’s arc but that’s a whole other post)

tony is afraid of himself, of what he could do or who he could become without something restraining him, of being the merchant of death with no accountability all over again

steve does what he does because he’s certain that what he’s doing is right; tony does what he does because he doesn’t trust himself to make that call anymore