and for liberty and justice for all

liberty and justice for all except when you’re black and you’re drowning and a bunch of punk ass kids laugh and record you as you die.

seriously. these kids did not call the police, before, during or after the man was drowning. they left him to decompose in the water. like trash. he was found 5 days later. fuck that “you’re not obligated to safe somebody’s life” bullshit. what the FUCK america. SHAME ON YOU.

6

TONIGHT: MASS SPELL AGAINST DONALD TRUMP! Here’s the spell!

(Light white candle)
Hear me, oh spirits
Of Water, Earth, Fire, and Air
Heavenly hosts
Demons of the infernal realms
And spirits of the ancestors
(Light inscribed orange candle stub)
I call upon you
To bind
Donald J. Trump
So that he may fail utterly
That he may do no harm
To any human soul
Nor any tree
Animal
Rock
Stream
or Sea
Bind him so that he shall not break our polity
Usurp our liberty
Or fill our minds with hate, confusion, fear, or despair
And bind, too,
All those who enable his wickedness
And those whose mouths speak his poisonous lies
I beseech thee, spirits, bind all of them
As with chains of iron
Bind their malicious tongues
Strike down their towers of vanity
(Invert Tower tarot card)
I beseech thee in my name
(Say your full name)
In the name of all who walk
Crawl, swim, or fly
Of all the trees, the forests,
Streams, deserts,
Rivers and seas
In the name of Justice
And Liberty
And Love
And Equality
And Peace
Bind them in chains
Bind their tongues
Bind their works
Bind their wickedness


(Light the small photo of Trump from the flame of the orange candle stub and hold carefully above the ashtray)
(Speak the following loudly and with increasing passion as the photo burns to ashes)
So mote it be!
So mote it be!
So mote it be!
(Blow out orange candle, visualizing Trump blowing apart into dust or ash*)
(Pinch, blow, or snuff out the white candle, ending the ritual)

(Sourced from Huffington Post)

✨Have fun witches, let him have it ✨
Remember that if you don’t have certain components for this spell, you can always change it to fit your own craft!

Student athlete: THE GRIND 💪😤🏈 is the only 💯 thing ☝️ that’s
flying 👼🏼 “high” 🙌😈 D1 bound 🏀🔥 rip grandma 🙏

AP student: hi? more like a GPA of 4.9📚👓 because that class rank 📝
📈is why an Ivy League 👀🎓 accepted me 🙋

Band student: Beethoven 👴🏼🎶 motivates me to 🙌 practice everyday
🎹😩🎼   from sun up ⬆️ ☀️to sun down ⬇️ 😤 just in time 🕗 for
sectionals 🎶 🎷

Business major: statistics show 📉📈  that  ur looking at a future CEO
🏢💵 and that my money 💵💸 will be greater will be greater than yours
💪 Econ forever 😩🙌

Law student: FOLLOW THE LAW 😤🚓 or  so justice will be served  ⚖️🔨
once I pass the bar exam 📃📄 for Liberty ✊ and justice for all 🌎🇺🇸

STEM Major: while you 😒 are busying doing nothing 🚫🚫 with your easy
major 😴😴I🙋 will be in the lab🔬📂 saving the environment 🌿🌲🌎 and
lives 🙏🏥🚨

Student actor: the stage is my home 🏠🎤soprano is where it’s at 😈🎼
Shakespeare is my inspiration 🙌 and lin-manuel miranda is my daddy
✊🎬

Art student: no one beats me 🙅 like I beat the canvas📜 but at the
end of the day 🌅 the world is our canvas 🌎🌈 because earth 🌏
without “art” 🎨 is just “eh” 😒😴 also I’m broke

Psychology Student: what  👀 is  👀 that  👀 in  👀 your  👀 head 🙋? can I pick it apart and study 📚 it 📚?

MC as a Barista

I thought of this while in star bucks one day. What if MC worked at a coffee shop part time before meeting the RFA and continued to work there after joining and one of the members walked in and ordered a drink without realizing it was MC. So she obviously recognized  them from chat so she wrote a little message on their cups, only for them to realize it after they left. ? 

I apologize if this is kind OOC? Feed back is appreciated!

Yoosung

  • Stands there for awhile before heading to the counter
  • MC smiles brightly at him as she recognized him.
  • Orders a Venti Hot chocolate
  • MC nods and says “Coming right up, can I get your name for the order?”
  • a small giggle escaped her as she nodded and walked away with his cup before writing down a special note for him.
  • “ It was nice to see you in person, Superman Yoosung! ^3^. Since I made you this drink…you got to return the favor remember? - MC ❤ ”
  • He thinks she’s cute but he can’t fall for the barista right? He’s already talking to MC via messenger!
  • They exchange thank you’s and he walks out.
  • Notices the little note on the side of his cup as he got to the bus stop to head to the University.
  • NON STOP SMILES FOR THE REST OF THE DAY
  • sends a text message to MC
  • “MC!!! Why didn’t you tell me you worked there?!! I can’t bring myself to throw this cup away now! It’s just a reminder that we are really under the same sky!

Zen

  • Walks in, obviously thinks the barista is cute
  • MC smiles as friendly as she could. She didn’t want to make it obvious.
  • His ego get’s the best of him
  • “I bet you’re a fan, You want a autograph? How about a Selca with me?”
  • She nods and takes out her phone real quickly. Takes the photo
  • he’s now grinning. she’s so cute ~
  • Orders a grande Tea.
  • MC nods as she turned to start his order.
  • Writes
  • “You were right, you are more handsome in person. Also I managed to get your fan club to come to the party ~ Hopefully I can get my hands on you too, Zenny ~ MC  ❤ “
  • After they exchange thank you’s he flashed her a playful smirk and winked.
  • Quickly she logged onto the messenger to leave the selca they took together with the caption
  • “…I ran into my favorite actor today hehe ~ !
  • [ photo attachment of her and Zen together ]
  • As Zen left he took a drink only to see the note in the corner of his eye
  • turning the cup. He read it
  • CUE HIM SPITTING OUT HIS HOT DRINK
  • debates to turn back or not
  • hears his messenger go off
  • reads what MC says and laughs as he seen her sign off real fast.
  • decides to send a text message to her
  • “You know I will be coming over here every day now to see my princess ~

Jaehee

  • She decided to go to a different cafe today
  • walks into MC’s work place.
  • Looks at the beverage board for a few minutes
  • MC standing there with a huge grin on her face
  • tries so hard to not say her name out loud.
  • as Jaehee walks up to the counter she orders
  • 1 for her boss. A espresso with 2 shots for him
  • 1 for her. A Venti coffee for her. ( 3 creams 4 sugars )
  • MC Nodded as she asked which cup is her drink.
  • Quickly writes a small note on her cup
  • “You can do this Jaehee! Remember I am here for you if you ever need support ~ Cheer up! - MC  ❤  “
  • and writes another note on Jumin’s cup
  • “…you better be nice to Jaehee today, She’s human too. - MC”
  • As she put the cup in the cup holders she smiled towards Jaehee
  • “…I hope you have a nice day, Miss. Jaehee ~”
  • That’s when Jaehee smiled and nodded, walking out she went back to the car. Passing one cup to Jumin.
  • a small pause
  • “Assistant Kang?”
  • Oh no… he doesn’t like it does he??
  • “…MC wrote some strange note on my cup”
  • looks at it. Gasps lightly as she noticed there was writing on her cup as well.
  • Smiles brightly as they drove past the cafe
  • NOW SHE CAN’T STOP SMILING
  • ALL DAY ALL SMILES. HAPPY BAEHEE
  • and a confused Jumin

Jumin

  • RARELY goes to a cafe on his own.
  • ASSISTANT KANG HELP
  • walks in on his own, instantly regrets it.
  • how does one order a drink? do they walk up?
  • do they come to him?
  • MC can’t help but suppress the giggling and smiling she’s doing
  • C & R Director is in her coffee shop looking so lost.
  • Decides to walk up to him with a pen and paper in hand
  • “…Excuse me J—Sir?”
  • a commoner walking up to him? so he was right they walk up to you
  • “…you seem out of place. You need help?”
  • a flash smile touched his lips before walking up to the counter with her
  • Asks which drink is the best.
  • “…you seem like the type of man who’d enjoy a regular type of drink. I can make you a grande french vanilla?”
  • nods as he paid and left a reasonable tip
  • LET’S JUST SAY HE LIKED THE HELP
  • AND MAYBE HER FACE
  • AND THAT NO-ONE TOOK TIME TO HELP
  • he’s waiting for his cup on the other side so she took liberty to write a small note
  • “…I cannot help but think you’re so cute while all flustered. Please say hello to Elizabeth 3rd for me. I hope you have a good day at work. - MC ❤ “
  • After she was done she passed it over to him
  • “Have a nice day, Mr. Jumin, sir ~ “
  • turns around and nods before walking to his car.
  • As he got in he noticed the small note on the side
  • reading it he couldn’t help but chuckle
  • “…Driver Kim. I want to come to this exact place every day at the same time.”

Luciel / 707 / defender of justice ….[Saeyoung]

  • Already knew she worked there. But since he was rare to post selca’s in chat
  • he decided to have fun with this.
  • Walks in and decides to grab a smoothie for the day.
  • RIGHT SOMETHING HEALTHY FOR ONCE
  • What Saeyoung forgot is that he recently posted a photo of himself in chat
  • MC knew who he was. Seven knew who she was
  • LET THE GAMES BEGIN
  • “…what’s your healthiest smoothie?”
  • “…I’d have to say the orange mango smoothie. It hits the taste buds”
  • “…okay can I get a hot chocolate”
  • 707 that little shit
  • “can I get a name for this order?”
  • “Tom”
  • MC snorts as she nods, grabbing his cup she wrote a small note
  • “using your friend’s name huh? well it was nice to see you in person, God seven! now go save the earth!  ~ 606 ❤ “
  • they exchange thank you’s and good byes before he walked away
  • he looked down at his cup and couldn’t help but laugh.
  • “my 606 ~ “

A conservative magazine called the Philando Castile case a “miscarriage of justice”

  • One conservative voice broke rank with the right in speaking out on the Philando Castile case, calling the Friday acquittal of the officer who fatally shot the licensed gun owner in Minnesota a “miscarriage of justice.”
  • “This is unacceptable,” National Review correspondent David French wrote about the verdict in a Sunday afternoon edition of its The Corner column. “It represents the most extreme possible deprivation of civil rights and civil liberties,” he continued.
  • Castile, by all accounts, was a law-abiding, licensed gun carrier who had committed no crime prior to being pulled over for a broken tail light on July 6, 2016. Read more (6/19/17)

follow @the-movemnt

With abortion it’s like God gives you a present, a gift. He goes, “Here, my child, here is the best gift I can offer to you!” And he’s all excited! And then you open this gift and go “oh…..um…. God, I wasn’t asking for a baby… No thanks, I didn’t want one. Sorry, I’m just going to return it….” And God is heartbroken that you didn’t want his gift that meant so much to Him and He hoped it would mean something to you.

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

God bless America!

Black History Month 2017

Planned Parenthood strives to create a world where sexual and reproductive health care is accessible, affordable, and compassionate — no matter what.

Black women have always championed reproductive freedom and the elimination of racism and sexism as an essential element of the struggle toward civil rights. This Black History Month, Planned Parenthood honors the resilience of Black women like Dr. N. Louise Young and Dr. Thelma Patten Law,  two of the first Black women health care providers at Planned Parenthood — and the resistance of women like Angela Davis who continue to fight for the full dignity, autonomy and the humanity of all women.

In commemoration of Black History Month each year, we lift up and celebrate those who have defied their time and circumstances to become Dream Keepers and freedom fighters. #100YearsStrong of Planned Parenthood could not be possible without the vision, tenacity and determination of those who have kept and protected the dream of reproductive freedom, justice and autonomy.

The 2017 Dream Keepers

Ida B. Wells-Barnett
Journalist, Civil Rights Activist

Ida B. Wells-Barnett was the most prominent Black woman journalist of the late 19th and early 20th century. Her research and reporting around the lynching of Black people helped to bring national attention to the crisis and pushed federal legislation to hold mobs accountable.

Marsha P. Johnson
Activist, Stonewall Rioter

Marsha P. Johnson, co-founder of the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), is credited with being one of the first people to resist the police during the Stonewall Riots of 1969. On the commemorative anniversary of the riots in 1970, Johnson led protesters to the Women’s Detention Center of New York chanting, “Free our sisters. Free ourselves,” which demonstrated early solidarity between LGBTQ rights and anti-prison movements.

Former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm
Black Feminist, Former Presidential Candidate

In 1990, Shirley Chisholm — along with former Planned Parenthood Federation of America president Faye Wattleton, Byllye Avery, Donna Brazile, Dorothy Height, Maxine Waters, and Julianne Malveaux (among others) — formed the group African American Women for Reproductive Freedom to show their support for Roe v. Wade, doing so with what we now call a reproductive -justice framework. The former New York representative was the first African American woman elected to Congress. During her seven terms, Rep. Chisholm pioneered the Congressional Black Caucus and was an unwavering champion for women’s reproductive rights and access to health care, including abortion. In 2015, President Obama awarded Rep. Chisholm with the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.

Dr. N. Louise Young

Dr. N. Louise Young, a gynecologist and obstetrician, opened her practice in Baltimore in 1932. She later operated a Planned Parenthood health center that was opened with the assistance of the local Urban League and other community partners.

Dr. Thelma Patten Law

Dr. Thelma Patten Law becomes one of the first Black women ob-gyns in Texas. She provided health care for more than 25 years at the Planned Parenthood Houston Health Center, which opened in 1936.

Faye Wattleton
Author, Advocate for Reproductive Freedom, Former President of PPFA

In 1978, Wattleton became the youngest individual at the time and the first African American woman to serve as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA). During Wattleton’s 14–year tenure, PPFA became one of the nation’s largest charitable organizations. Under Wattleton’s leadership, the organization secured federal funding for birth control and prenatal programs; fought against efforts to restrict legal abortions; and, along with reproductive health allies, helped to legalize the sale of abortion pill RU-486 in the United States.

The Coiners of Reproductive Justice

Black women’s existence has inherently challenged the “choice vs. life” argument. However the creation and coining of reproductive justice ushered in a new framework where women of color could express all of the ways their sexual and reproductive autonomy is systemically limited.

Dr. Dorothy Roberts
Author, Scholar, Professor

Dorothy Roberts is an acclaimed scholar of race, gender and the law. Her books include Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century (New Press, 2011); Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books, 2002), and Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Pantheon, 1997) — all of which have shaped and informed scholarship around reproductive justice.

@DorothyERoberts


Monica Roberts
Historian, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of TransGriot

Monica Roberts, aka the TransGriot, is a native Houstonian and trailblazing trans community leader. She works diligently at educating and encouraging acceptance of trans people inside and outside the larger African-American community and is an award-winning blogger, history buff, thinker, lecturer and passionate advocate on trans issues.


Dr. Iva Carruthers
Past President of Urban Outreach Foundation, General Secretary of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference

Carruthers uses her ministry as a vehicle for addressing social issues, particularly those involving people of African descent both in the United States and abroad. She is past president of the Urban Outreach Foundation, a nonprofit, interdenominational organization that assists African and African-American communities with education, health care, and community development.

@IvaCarruthers



Rev. Dr. Alethea Smith-Withers
Founder and Pastor; The Pavilion of God, Washington, DC; and Chair of the Board of Directors for Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice

Rev. Smith-Withers has been an active advocate for reproductive justice for many years. She is currently serving as the chair of the board of directors of Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC). She is the founder and pastor of The Pavilion of God, a Baptist Church in DC.  She hosts “Rev UP with Rev. Alethea”, a BlogTalkRadio show.

@RevAlethea


Rev. Dr. Susan Moore
Associate Minister at All Souls Church Unitarian

Dr. Moore’s ministry has focused upon the challenges facing urban America. An HIV/AIDS and teen pregnancy prevention educator and trainer, she has worked with several community and faith-based groups, including the DC Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Planned Parenthood, and AIDS Action Foundation. She actively advocates for a national, coordinated AIDS strategy to reduce racial disparities, lower the incidence of infection, increase access to care, and involve all stakeholders.


Bevy Smith
CEO and Founder of Dinner with Bevy

A Harlem native and New York fashion fixture, Smith is outspoken about women’s empowerment and social justice. She gives back by connecting and engaging a network of top leaders to promote social change.

@bevysmith


Mara Brock Akil
Screenwriter and producer and founder of Akil Productions

Mara Brock Akil is the co-creator of hit TV shows Girlfriends, The Game, and Being Mary Jane.  She is a tireless advocate of women’s health and rights.

@MaraBrockAkil


Tracy Reese
American fashion designer

Relentless PPFA supporter, Reese is a board member of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

@Tracy_Reese


Kimberlé W. Crenshaw
Scholar, Professor at the UCLA and Columbia Schools of Law

Kimberlé W. Crenshaw is a feminist scholar and writer who coined the term “Intersectionality.” Kimberlé  is the co-founder of the African American Policy Forum, which developed seminal research on Black women and girls and the school-to-prison pipeline and policing, including, respectively: “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected” and “Say Her Name.”

@SandyLocks

Angela Peoples
Co-Director of GetEqual

Serving as the Co-Director of GetEqual, Angela is working to ensure that Black lives and gender justice is a guiding force in LGBTQ work.

@MsPeoples


Jazmine Walker
Reproductive Justice Leader

Jazmine is a big fine woman who specializes in reproductive justice and agricultural economic development.

Her dedication to public scholarship and activism is driven by a passion to amplify feminist and reproductive justice discourse around Black women and girls, especially those in Mississippi and the broader South.


Amandla Stenberg
Actress, Author

This Black queer feminist makes us look forward to the next generation of feminist leaders and thinkers.

Her YouTube video, “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows,” clapped-back against the cultural appropriation of Black fashion and style and won our hearts.

@amandlastenbergs


Charlene A. Carruthers
National Director for Black Youth Project 100

Political organizer Carruthers is building a national network and local teams of young Black activists.  She is committed to racial justice, feminism, and youth leadership development.

@CharleneCac


Monica Simpson
Executive Director of SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

At SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, Simpson works to amplify and strengthen the collective voices of indigenous women and women of color to ensure reproductive justice through securing human rights. She has organized extensively against the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon the minds, bodies, and spirits of African Americans with an emphasis on African-American women and the African-American LGBT community.

@SisterSong_WOC


Deon Haywood
Executive Director, Women With A Vision, Inc.

Haywood works tirelessly to improve quality of life and health outcomes for marginalized women of color.  Since Hurricane Katrina, Haywood has led Women With a Vision, a New Orleans-based community organization addressing the complex intersection of socio-economic injustices and health disparities.  

@WWAVinc


Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
Congresswoman, D-TX 18th District

Congresswoman Jackson Lee has been a staunch supporter of Planned Parenthood and women’s health.

This year she has become a valuable champion as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, where she was vocal at both hearings displaying a clear understanding of the important role Planned Parenthood health centers play in the communities they serve. She also came to the floor on several occasions and attended a Planned Parenthood’s press conference, lending her voice in the fight against backwards legislation.

@JacksonLeeTX18


Del. Stacey Plaskett
Congresswoman, D-US-VI

Delegate Stacey Plaskett became a supporter of Planned Parenthood this year when she spoke out for Planned Parenthood health center patients during a Oversight and Government Reform hearing, where she is a member, commenting that she would like a Planned Parenthood health center in the Virgin Islands.

@StaceyPlaskett


Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
Congresswoman, D-DC

As a fierce, passionate, Black feminist and reproductive health advocate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton has supported Planned Parenthood unwaveringly. She also sponsored the EACH Woman Act and, in 2015, held an event with young women on abortion access.

@EleanorNorton


Rep. Joyce Beatty
Congresswoman, D-OH 3rd District

Rep. Beatty has been an active supporter of women’s health during her tenure in Congress, cosponsoring legislation, signing onto pro-letters and always voting in the interest of women’s health.


Rep. Maxine Waters
Congresswoman, D-CA 43rd District

Since arriving in office in 1990, Rep. Waters has voted in the best interest of the health of women and communities of color, making a career of addressing these issues by closing the wealth gap.    

This photo is going around on the internet right now, like some cheap meme with the caption “Here’s a photo for all those upset about the Muslim ban.“ I was compelled to write a response. I know this is a tumblr for Pokemon GO and I’ve tried my best for these months to keep posting fun things about this fandom but I cannot stay silent. I am sorry for the deviation from the norm you have all come to expect from me, but this I cannot abide. This is my message:

My father worked at the World Trade Centers from 1998-2001. He survived that day because he took me to school that morning when I was in my third or fourth day of 6th grade. This isn’t about my father, though, because he can tell his story in his own way when he feels it is appropriate. I will explain my own story.

I had been pulled out of class that morning. They didn’t tell me what had happened, just assuring my 11 year old self that my father was okay and that there was a fire at the World Trade Centers. I know they were lying. They couldn’t put me in touch with my father. I knew something was wrong. I knew about the 1993 bombings. I often wondered what would happen in the towers fell on the city, looking down on it from above, if such an attack were to happen again.

Sitting in the principals office I was filled with anger, sadness, disgust, loneliness, despair, anxiety, depression and chaos. My father might have been dead, killed by terrorist from a land I knew nothing about. I sat in that office for 45 minutes thinking nothing but that.

Then my mom came to get me. She told me my father was okay. Then I saw him. He was crying. We hugged. I told him that as long as he was okay I was okay. That made everything okay.

I had every right to be upset and vindictive against the muslim community because of the acts of an element of radical extremists attempting to murder my father. In fact some of my peers actually encouraged me to fill my hear with hate and anger, to put aside my childish wonder of the world and build walls in my heart to separate me from the muslim faith as a whole. The propaganda on television and the fact we were entering into two wars as retribution for September Eleventh didn’t help.

But I couldn’t do it. Something inside of me wanted to answer the burning question of “why?”. So I did some research in the middle school computer lab and very quickly found my answer. There is a large contingent of radical terrorists, of every nation and faith, that are drawn to the cause because they have no other options. I read that a suicide bomber in Iraq was paid $20,000 to carry out his attack. This money was needed for his family to pay for shelter, electricity, food, water, security and heat. The basic essentials that allow us to be human and not think with hate and sadness but rather with compassion and understanding. The people in Afghanistan, in the mountainous regions, join extremist groups because they have no resources to sustain their life.

That was when I learned about the concept of ‘sustainability’. The Brundtland Report in 1987 defined sustainability loosely as any action that leaves the world in a better or same state as the way you came into it. I decided at that point, as a 12 year old, to not fight the extremists with a gun, but rather to help get the muslim community the essentials they need so they never have to feel like terrorism is the only way to support themselves, their family or have their message heard.

Islamic extremists tried to kill my family. I do not hate the muslim community. I am a vocal opponent of the muslim ban, registry or oppression. All people no matter what race, creed, nationality, faith, background, color, gender, sex, identification, whatever deserve to be treated as human beings. Because thats what we all are when you get down to it. We are humans, of many glorious and wonderful backgrounds and interests, that should work together rather than divide ourselves. We are one species no matter what you look like or sound like. The blood that runs through my veins runs through the veins of the man in Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey, Somalia, France, Russia, China, North Korea, everywhere.

We are a nation that has a proud history of accepting people of all backgrounds. I am German. If this ideology had been pervasive in the 1930-40s then wouldn’t I have been held accountable for the actions of the Nazi’s in the same way that people of the muslim faith are persecuted for the actions of the extremists? I have muslim friends. If I can not hate them, can you try to exercise a little empathy for the innocent people caught up in this?

I will leave you with a couple of quotes for thought:

“In these days of difficulty, we Americans everywhere must and shall choose the path of social justice…the path of faith, the path of hope, and the path of love toward our fellow man.” - Franklin Roosevelt

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” - Statue of Liberty

Love always. Reject hate. Be compassionate. Be empathetic. Love thy neighbor. Protect the innocent. Fight for the oppressed. Crush evil. Be vigilant. Be strong. Be good.

I love you all. Remember that, always.

- T 


The United States is a really free country guys! Please ignore the fact that we literally have more of our population in cages than any other country ever! Liberty and justice for all!