and fighting skills

My favourite thing about Prometheus aside from Josh’s performance is how they managed to make him threatening without dumbing down Oliver or his fighting skills. Physically he was never a problem for Oliver because realistically after all the ass kicking Oliver did over the years no one should best him in a fight at this point. Their entire fight in the finale is Oliver beating the shit out of him yet that didnt make him any less scary. They also did smart by not making him have magic or any superhuman power or even an army. He was just plain smart and psychotic and really devoted to his plan. Yes i would have liked more explanations about how he managed to do and know some things but other than that everything about him is just A+.

Bmc

You know what’s a bit sad? The fact that the squips seem to be people their uh… consumers (?) like or admire (Keanau Reeves, a popular actor for jeremy, and Hillary Clinton, a successful strong woman for christine.)
And It’s been confirmed that rich had evil Kermit as his squip. It could just be a funny joke and all, but hear me out.
Young rich having an abusive father, a mother who couldn’t stay with him (my hc is that she had to go to the hospital for terminal illness and that’s a main reason his dad drinks too much)
And being sad and scared because he didn’t know what was gonna happen if he lost his mother, And finally- he finds his escape from the world. Fucking Muppets. He watches every movie, and when “Muppets most wanted” comes out, he fucking LOVES the concept of evil kermit and kinda admires his having a ton of fighting skills and learning how to act like his lookalike etc, etc.
Bonus:
When his squip appears to him, it pulls off the hood and says ominously “Kermit the frog, here.”
And rich yells “HOLY SHIT-KERMIT???”

anonymous asked:

I was doing a kind of western steampunk vampire thing and both my characters have to go to some kind of meeting of the group leaders across the country and on that journey they find out that the vampires are trying to rebel against the humans. Do I have to have to have a reason why they're pretty decent at fighting? Do you have any suggestions as to how I can get them to that point? The boy just joined the group but the girl's been there for a long time and pretty good at defending herself

Hello there!

You had me at western steampunk. :D

If this girl has been a part of the group for a while, and has a decent amount of experience fighting vampires, then her skill level can be easily justified. There is certainly value in training, but experience plays at least as large a role in how good of a fighter someone is under pressure. 

As such, it might be slightly more difficult to explain the new recruit’s fighting skill. If he’s green at fighting, then he simply won’t be good. Willingness to do damage and a drive to survive will only take someone so far, especially when fighting supernatural beings. Adrenaline typically hinders one’s ability to fight, it does not enhance it. When you haven’t been training in suppressing the jitteriness and reason-blocking effects of an adrenaline rush, then you are going to have a hard time overcoming that initial mental block when presented face-to-face with death. Fight or flight instinct will kick in, and in many people, the “fight” instinct has to be learned…the brain rewired.

I have about seven years of martial arts training, and while I have always done well in tournaments and such, fighting on the street isn’t something I feel remotely prepared to take on because it’s a different kind of fighting. If this kid is going to be fighting vampires, he needs training specific to that situation, training where no holds are barred and no one pulls their punches. 

Did this boy have any training before hand? Does he have anything in his past that would have trained his fight instinct? How much has he been taught about their weaknesses?

This article from Cracked has some interesting things to consider. 
There’s also How to Win a Street Fight…but you’ll find half of their advice basically amounts to: don’t get in one.

TL;DR: No, you don’t have to specifically justify their skill or lack-thereof, but keep in mind how their experience will play into their mental state and finesse during a fight.

anonymous asked:

What do you think about Tybalt and Mercutio's character?

I don’t know if the singular here is a typo, but interestingly I do think Mercutio and Tybalt are very similar in personalities—one character split between two sides: decidedly impetuous, warm-blooded, insolent to the point of ignoring the authority figures in their lives (Tybalt defies Capulet’s warnings against provoking Romeo; Mercutio couldn’t care less about the Prince’s rules against fueling the feud between Capulet/Montague). 

They often mirror each other: in the way they look feverishly for Romeo during the ball; in the way they duel, equals in their fighting skills and both called “brave” by Benvolio after their deaths; both killed by Romeo, although unwittingly (”I was hurt under your arm”, says Mercutio); both mad with the summer heat and always ready to fight (”M : Couple it with something, make it a word and a blow / T : You shall find me apt enough to that, sir”); both transformed into tragedic devices after death: sufferings for the lovers (her dearest cousin, his dearest friend)—renewed hate between the families—accelerating the dramatic action through Romeo’s banishment and Juliet’s marriage to Paris.

Tybalt is a key character, although he’s not often on stage, and dies quickly: I believe he lives most through Mercutio’s speeches, an allegory for the whole Capulet’s gang, and described at length through jests and insults (King of Cats, arithmetic duellist…). What’s fascinating is that although he’s often perceived as the antagonist (because we are compelled to side with the Montagues), his reactions match point by point those of Mercutio’s and Montague servants’. Benvolio and Romeo are exceptions: Tybalt and Mercutio represent Verona, the Verona that’s been put to fire and the sword by close and distant parents of the two houses. Figures of light-hearted hatred, of youthful violence, until they have to face the consequences.

I’ve talked more about Mercutio (gushed is the right word) here if you’re interested.

6

Paladin Swap → Pidge as the red paladin 

The red lion is temperamental and the most difficult to master. It’s faster and more agile than the others, but also more unstable. It’s pilot needs to be someone who relies more on instinct than skill alone. 

Picture I did for the Sheithzine  back in Nov!

This version is actually a little different than the actual one I submitted for the zine. I struggled a lot with the BG and didn’t like the results;; >< Sorry for the change;;

Thank you to everyone who supported the zine! I’m so thankful that I was able to participate!  

What’s really incredible about Mad Max: Fury Road is that our titular, brooding White Male Lead in an Action Movie™ is given no opportunities to appear badass or heroic unless he’s working as a team or directly helping the women.

We see Max alone in the desert, all brooding and action-hero-y, clearly haunted by a tragic past… and he’s immediately captured, chained, humiliated and spends the next half hour tied up and useless while Furiosa is off getting shit done.

Then he gets free and he comes in waving a gun around and embarrassing himself. It’s not until Furiosa calms him down, wins him over, and he starts following her orders that he’s allowed to appear properly badass - in an action sequence that begins with him handing her a gun, and which progresses with the two of them working as the ultimate team while the girls help him as much as he defends them.

Then they’re in the Night Bog. Max fails to hit the Bullet Farmer and instead becomes a prop to steady Furiosa’s shot. Then he runs off on a solo mission and it doesn’t even merit screen time. Some dude lone wolfing it to kill a scary bad guy? Who cares. Let’s watch Nux running in front of the rig and the girls cooling down the engines instead.

Then comes the final chase. Max is undeniably awesome, but he is only allowed to be awesome because all of his efforts are dedicated to helping and protecting his weird new family. And the instant he hears Furiosa is hurt, all of his badass moments are pivoted around reaching her. He fights a hundred war boys, jumps over trucks, swings off poles, sets of explosions, beats someone with a flamethrower guitar, just so he can be there to catch Furiosa once she has killed the big bad Immortan Joe.

And, of course, his biggest heroic moment in the film isn’t even a cool action sequence or taking out a villain - it’s saving someone’s life. It’s being selfless and compassionate. It’s expressing love and humanity. It’s acting as a nurse and donating his blood. Max’s triumph is fixing something that’s broken.

Then, at the end, instead of being rewarded with a sexy girl and something else cool like most action heroes, Max gets nothing. He gives everything to Furiosa - his love, his loyalty, his fighting skills, his blood, his name - and he takes nothing in return, nor does he feel he is owed anything. He is content simply to help her, and thanks to this love and selflessness he was able to achieve some kind of redemption. 

In Fury Road, a man’s heroism is not determined by how strong or tough he is - it is defined by how willing he is to love, help, support and protect others, particularly women, while demanding nothing in return. 

Voltron prompt

Lance knows that he’s not the best member on the team, he sees all the looks from Shiro and Allura. Yeah he tries his hardest but fighting has never been his thing. Back at home he would wrestle with his siblings but that was the extent of his fighting skills.

On days he would let his mind wander too far he would go to the training deck and try to fight out his anger like Keith does but that never really helped him.

One night he went into the training deck to get some extra practice when an idea came to him. He plugged in his music player into the control system and activated the training bot.

Never before had he fought with such ease. With the music playing he was able to turn it into a dance, a fast paced, dangerous, and absolutely stunning dance.

He trained like that for weeks, his skills steadily improving. But he never told the others. He’s not sure why he felt the need to keep it a secret from the rest of the team, but he did. Maybe he thought they would laugh at him for training that way, maybe he was afraid that wouldn’t let him train that way anymore cuz that’s not how soldiers fight.

Maybe it was both.

It was a day after a particularly hard mission that they found him. The missing went off, things didn’t go as planned and while no one got hurt, the mission was still a failure.

Lance had waited for everyone to go to sleep before he went to the training deck and started from level one. When the others woke up, on the way to the dining room they heard music. Not loud but definitely there. Together they followed the sound to the training deck doors, only for them to be locked. Allura then led the group to the training decks observation room.

They were all in shock to see Lance fighting. Beautiful and deadly. There were training bots scattered all across the deck, and the castle was having a hard time clearing the broken bodies with the rate Lance was dropping them. They watched for a while, totally captivated by the Lance was moving his body. Allura was the first to regain herself and ended the training session. Just before the the console shut off, it displayed the level it had ended on. Level 23.

2

I don’t know… night vision.
          There’s a rune for that.

somebodylost-chan  asked:

I'd like to ask, how do you know when fight/smut scenes are necessary? Or how to make them effective & not simply as fanservice or just for word count? Usually, I find myself skimming through fight scenes as a reader, bored. As a writer, I'm inclined to just 'fade to black' and imply stuff at the next chapters. I'm not really a fight/smut-scene writer, even though my characters know & need to fight. Thanks for keeping this blog. :D

A good fight scene (and a good smut scene for that matter) always works in the service of the narrative. It works toward the cohesive big picture.

From an entertainment standpoint, violence is boring.

You need your audience invested in the characters participating in the violence, in the actions and events leading up to the fight, in the aftermath and how this will effect the character’s overall goals.

In a narrative context, if you’re bored during a fight scene or a sex scene it’s because the build up to that moment failed. The scene itself may also have failed. However, your foundation is what makes your story sing.

Think of a story like building blocks. You’re playing Jenga with your reader on a homemade house, they’re slowly pulling out the pieces and you’re betting you built your blocks well enough to withstand scrutiny. You’ve got to keep them interested long enough to get to the end before the whole thing comes tumbling down.

A fight sequence which works in concert with it’s narrative is enjoyable, doesn’t overstay it’s welcome, and ultimately works to build up the story it’s telling. Fighting isn’t fighting, you see. Combat is a form of problem solving, the fight itself is an expression of the character’s individuality. Everything we’ve been learning about them, their goals, and their behaviors are being put in a pressure cooker and dialed up.

You should be learning about the character as the fight progresses, the fight working on multiple levels in concert with its narrative to get the story where it needs to go. Often, a first fight is like an establishing shot in film. You get a feel for who this character is when under pressure, who they are. Peril can be a great way to get the audience invested, but its up to the author to prove why they should.

Poor fight sequences don’t tell you anything. They’re there to establish the character as capable of fighting but don’t even do that because their concept of combat is generic.

The combatants aren’t individuals expressing themselves, the fight isn’t proving anything except fighting, it doesn’t have meaning except for its attempts to prove the narrative’s poor concept of badassery. This often happens with no regard for the setting’s rules, the aftermath consequences, what the character’s actions will effect in the long run.

It doesn’t mean anything and, while violence is shocking and terrifying in real life, in fiction violence has to mean more than just an exchange of blows.

How many times have you read a book where several mooks show up to get their ass kicked by the protagonist? They limp off at the end and while they’re often in a perfect position to be seen again due to their connections, we never do.

In even just a moderately competent narrative, those same mooks are characters. We’ll see them again in bit roles. They’ll play a role, either to help or hurt later as an aftermath consequence of the protagonist’s earlier actions. These are callback characters we can use to remind the audience of what happened previously in the narrative, and offer up some catharsis.

In a really well written scene, these mooks serve an important purpose when it comes to establishing the protagonist’s character in a quick snapshot. Like the moderately competent character, they come back later to the aid or the detriment of the protagonist. The mooks’ response actions are a direct result of their encounter with the character, often acting as an inciting incident. The protagonist suffers direct consequences as a result of their actions, whether its injury, loss, or the attention of the villain which causes them to lose something. In these fight scenes, you can see the story’s trajectory because it acts as another way to get to know the hero, the secondary characters, the tertiary characters, and whoever else is participating. It’s working on five different levels.

What you often see in a good fight sequence, whether it’s in a written medium or film, is the culmination of a great deal of hard work on the part of the author. A smut sequence is a reward, it’s a way to pay off on the reader’s investment in the relationship between these two characters and the narrative’s investment in them. It doesn’t matter if that’s hardcore sex, or a Victorian hand touch, or a knockout blow to the jaw, the end result is the same. It’s entertaining, satisfying, and even cathartic.

A poor sex scene is just dolls bumping bits. A poor fight scene is just dolls trading blows. Nothing occurs, nothing happens, there’s none of the underlying satisfaction or catharsis in the outcome. You don’t have any investment, no consequences, it overstays its welcome and tells you nothing about the characters.

You’ve no reason to care, so you don’t.

As a reader, you don’t owe a writer attention when reading their work. They’ve got to earn it. If they aren’t, then it may be that the story isn’t for you and that’s okay. Take into account your tastes,

It takes practice to choreograph a fun fight scene. Writing sex and violence is mostly about learning to find your limits (i.e. what you’re comfortable with writing), and overcoming embarrassment. Determine the difference between need and want.

Are you avoiding writing these scenes because you’re scared of being bad at them or because they just don’t interest you?

These are two very different issues, and it’s easy to hide from the first behind the second. Be honest with yourself. If it is fear, then don’t give into it. The easy solution if you’re afraid of being bad at something is to practice. Start looking critically at the media you consume, when you start to get bored during a fight scene or a sex scene, when you want to skip ahead, ask yourself, “why?”. Check out the sequences and stories where this doesn’t happen, and try to figure out the differences between the two.

When it comes to the mechanics of both violence and sex, the more you learn the better off you’ll be at writing it. The more you practice writing violence/sex/romance then the better you’ll be. Like with everything, it’ll probably be pretty terrible in the beginning but the more you practice, the better you get. Writing itself is a skill, but its also a lot of sub-skills built in underneath the surface. Being good at dialogue doesn’t mean you’ll be good at action, having a knack for great characterization doesn’t mean you’ll be good at writing setting description. Putting together great characters doesn’t mean you’ll automatically be good at worldbuilding.

Don’t be too hard on yourself.

All it takes to figure out whether or not the time to fight is right is by listening to your gut.

Remember, the best scenes are based in narrative cohesion and emotional investment. They’re a pay off in and of themselves for your audience, dessert after dinner. They aren’t the meat and potatoes. If you set out to just write a fight scene or write a smut scene then it’ll get gratuitous. Then the focus is on the fight or the sex itself, hangs entirely on their shoulders, and you’ve just upped the ante for how entertaining you need to be.

It’s not “how do I write a fight scene”, it’s “how did my characters get to this point and why are they fighting”. If you start from a character place, it gets easier. The same is true with romance. “How do my characters participate in a romance (sex or not)”.

Make it about the individuals, that’s when it really gets fun.

And, if you get too stuck, try writing fight scenes with characters who don’t know much about how to fight. Sometimes, it’s easier to get into it when you begin at the beginning. There’s a lot less pressure convincing an audience with a character who knows nothing than one at the top of their field.

There’s a lot less stress about “is this right?” when you’re trying to get a feel for the flow if you’re dealing with a character who doesn’t know jack shit. Fight scenes with characters who know nothing can also be really, really, really fun. They’re wild, improvisational frenzies where all you have is the character sorting through their alternative, non-fighting skills trying to figure out how to survive.

Believe it or not, this will help you because you don’t get to cheat with the idea that your character already knows what they’re doing when you don’t. It’ll help you tap into the character, seeing scenarios from their perspectives, and writing to that instead of “generic fight scene”. When you’re unsure, characters who know nothing about the subject matter they’re engaging in but still have to engage are great. They teach you how to write from the standpoint and perspective of the individual. You need those skills just as much when writing characters who are professionals or at the top of their field.

If you don’t think you can write an interesting fight sequence with a neophyte, then that might be a part of the problem. A character doesn’t need to be good at something to be entertaining. A smut sequence where everyone’s fumbling, knocking into each other, embarrassed, stuck in their clothing, cheesy, corny, and laughing can be just as fun (if not more so and more honest) than the ones that generally get envisioned.

For me, good is entertaining and the entertainment is based in humanity but you need to define “good” for yourself in your own writing. Be honest with yourself about your fears and you’ll find a way to bridge yourself to the kind of writing you want to be doing.

Freeing yourself of your own internalized preconceived notions will help a lot, and produce stories that are way more fun.

-Michi

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If reading the news is dragging you down into despair

There is a lot of awful news right now. In times like these, it’s important to have strategies for avoiding despair.

One strategy I’ve seen discussed a lot is limiting your exposure to the news. For instance, some people have decided not to read the news at night. This can be a really good strategy for some people — but it doesn’t work well for everyone.

If you keep telling yourself “I should really read the news less”, then reading the news constantly anyway, it may be that you need a different strategy.

For some people, the way to avoid despair involves reading the news *more*, not less. When the headlines are horrifying, it can make it seems like the world is made of horrors. It can take a lot more digging to find out that it is possible to fight the horrors. It can take a lot more digging to learn that some things are good, and that progress is still possible.

For instance, if you’re reading a terrifying news article about vote suppression in the South, find out which organizations are fighting for voting rights. Learn the stories of people who have fought for their right to vote and won. Learn specifics about the battles being fought now, and the people who are fighting them. Knowing this kind of context can help, a lot.

More generally: When you find that despair-inducing news is dragging you down, seek out context that goes beyond the horrors. The horrors are real, and so is everything else.

If all the stories you read are about horrifying policies, opposition can seem imaginary. Make sure you read enough about the opposition to understand that it’s real.

Similarly, wins are as real as losses. If all the stories you read are about losing, winning will seem imaginary. Make sure you also read enough about wins to understand that winning is a real thing.

(It also helps to take partial victories or near-victories seriously.)

Tl;dr When you’re reading a lot of news and feeling a lot of despair, sometimes the solution is to read the news less — and sometimes the solution is to read *more* of the news. When you only read stories about evil, good can seem imaginary. If you also seek out stories about people who fight evil, and about wins as well as losses, it can make it much more clear that goodness exists. For some people, that is the best strategy for avoiding despair in times when a lot of the news is horrifying.

Tragedy of Ignis

I feel like I already have a post like that. Well I’ll have two then. But you know what’s really sad? Ignis is a function character. It’s not me shitting on the story, there are actual real life people who live like that, molding all their lives around someone else. Typical thing for mothers, maybe that’s one of the reasons why fandom thinks about him as a mom-friend despite the fact that he is adventurous pun master dork. But really all his life since the early childhood was dedicated sorely to Noctis. There are Gladio and Luna who are quite literally live for Noctis to fulfill his role but still, Luna has her oracle shebang, Gladio expresses characteristics that has nothing to do to Noctis: he loves his sister, likes reading, hiking, getting stronger, even those cup noodles. 

Every habit or quality Ignis exhibits is there for Noctis. He may enjoy cooking but he got into it to lift the prince’s spirits after the Tenebrae attack. His knowledge, his manners, his skills at fight all were developed to guide a young king to his fullest potential. And not once he shows even a trace of resentment toward Noct, even having every right, even after this quest leaves him fucking blind. The depth of his devotion and selflessness is truly mind-boggling. 

And the saddest part? It’s all for nothing. He dedicated every second of his life to make Noctis a perfect ruler he never meant to be. 

King Regis never pressed his son to be a great leader because he won’t be, it was good enough if he lived happily for those short years he had. But Ignis didn’t get the memo so he kept on trying.  

I mean even the fact that each bro gets an episode to dive into their character, lives and motivations exclude Ignis. Because “his” episode is still emotionally Noct’s story of coming to terms with his father’s mortality and his own role as an heir.     

Imagine Legolas having to admit that he underestimated your fighting skills.
Although he was really worried about you, he’d be not only relieved to see that you are alright, but totally stunned by the beautiful warrior standing in front of him.
“My lady, that was breathtaking”

MBTI types as Teenager

ISTJ: start playing an instrument, talk when necessary, don’t like high school too much
ESTJ: responsable, probably have part-time job, do traditional school activities (team sport, band, laboratories)
ISFJ: quite, aware of the world around them, good at pratical activities, make their group of friends
ESFJ: sensitive with others, navigate in school activities, probably popular (in some way), know many people but have few close friends
INFJ: do well in school, occupated with something that involves music or writing, sometimes moody, have their way to be rebel
ENFJ: very sensitive to others opinion and emotion, make volonteering, start programing future and college
INFP: want to be accepted, insicure of abilities, don’t like school that much, feel alone at time
ENFP: good at making friends, begin to be more introspective, love outdoor sport, stressed out about school
INTJ: procrastinate home work for more interesting things, seen as wise and smart, fight with social skills (but have few friend)
ENTJ: select group of friends, become somehow rebellious, argue with adults (even teachers)
INTP: still misunderstood, very sarcastic, get lost in their mind during class, honest, don’t care much about criticism of others
ENTP: “smart guy, poor student” (ok not always), ironic, optimistic, need alone time, funny, a joker
ESTP: try figured out what to do in future, keep emotion to theirselves, act like everything is ok, athletic
ISTP: low profile, cool, share information of their interest, like physical sports, challenge themselves with various experience
ISFP: insicure, moody, observing, shy, express throught creative activities (music and drawing especially)
ESFP: have a lot of evergy, interested in music and drama stuff, want to try everything, make friends with anyone